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Old 21 August 2016, 07:29   #11
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The Typhoon PS220 looks very nice and the YT review great , would you boil alive in the summer tho ? and would this be overkill .

Horses for courses. Currently in France& our boat gear consists of shorts, flip flops, & an old goretex outer. If doing a long passage In dodgy weather, then the dry bags come out.


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Old 21 August 2016, 07:57   #12
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Originally Posted by daboss_uk View Post
The Typhoon PS220 looks very nice and the YT review great , would you boil alive in the summer tho ?
Yes, you need to layer under a membrane suit to keep warm, but they are horrible if you need to cool down - getting in the water or take them off is about it - using them half open is not a good idea in my world.

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and would this be overkill .
Again I believe so - why are you thinking dry suit? They were designed for being in water, waterproofs, dry trousers, dry tops, off shore coats give you plenty of options to keep warm and dry.

Are you looking at lots of winter passages?
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Old 21 August 2016, 08:50   #13
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Thanks for the info , i was simply thinking a drysuit would cover both summer and colder use rather than buying just a wetsuit tbh , not planning on going in the water much or winter stuff until i build experience , only time i will enter water would be to launch the boat and if i'm ever tossed over the side ( hopefully not ) . I was hoping the drysuit would work out well rather than buying other stuff to then purchase a DS further down the line etc.

Agreed regards having them open in summer ( DS ) , surely thats a bit deadly should you fall in?

I don't mind being hot and prefer being covered up from the burning sun , as long as the DS is actually breathable material rather than a lie , i guess if it became uncomfortable one could jump in the water ha!

Currently we have a 4m honwave to get started , we have a river cruiser and these are our first ventures onto the seas so not a total novice to boating , i'll purchase a RIB ( Redbay ) next year all being well .
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Old 21 August 2016, 10:23   #14
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dry trousers are good for keeping dry too. launching /recovery ect I have a pair of peak storm that I use when its hot weather you can wade up to your titties and keep dry and just wear a t shirt I take a short orange hi vis jacket ( 20) to chuck on if the weather changes .I wear my drysuit if there's a chance of it getting a bit choppy and its maybe a bit cold
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Old 21 August 2016, 10:54   #15
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Very seldom is it too hot in this country for a dry suit if hot jump in the oggin to cool park up unzip and take it off a bit, for me especially in these waters a must IMO it doesn't take long before your incapacitated in cold water that's if the shock doesn't get to you first,everyone to their own but think of the worst case scenario especially boating alone.
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Old 21 August 2016, 11:17   #16
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All the above advice is sound advice. And only you can decide if a DS is best for you. It is like the age old question, 'which boat is best for me?' Only you can decide.

If you are not planning on using in winter, or boating alone, or venturing too far from land, then it may be slightly over kill. I have a pair of 20 chest waders for launch and recovery, works a treat. easy to slip off, so not to get launch vehicle wet. DS for launching is a bit overkill.

I have built up my gear over the years, and still keep adding to it all the time. What I wear, all depends on time of year, sea temperature, weather conditions, where I am going, what activity I am doing, etc etc etc...!

As PD said above, front loader is a must, the glide skin seals (neoprene) are really comfortable compared to latex, and the fabric feet last longer.
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Old 21 August 2016, 11:25   #17
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I've seen people dressed in 1k's worth of Musto gear piss wet through after a lumpy crossing. Water will find its way into necks, sleeves, ankles etc. Never been wet in my 300 drysuit.


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Old 21 August 2016, 11:43   #18
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Drysuit all the way for harsher weather conditions.
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Old 23 August 2016, 11:06   #19
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Thanks for the valuable info chaps , i'll have a ponder on the various points above .

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Old 23 August 2016, 14:24   #20
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I know it's not Scotland but I spent a large part of 2012 in Weymouth on the water up to 35+ kts (Force 6-7+) with lows around 7 celsius. A lot of the time (5 days a week) on a 5.8m dry rib I would wear a dry top smock over breathable 3-layer gore-tex trousers or salopettes with very good comfy boots. Can't say I had much issues except when I had to pull up anchor lines for racing marks and sometimes I would submerge my arm elbow deep to grab the line but even then it wasn't terrible.

The top is the key to good protection from water as there are many many ways for it to enter and that's why I prefer a dry smock.

I think I would go insane if I had to wear a one piece dry suit all the time, weather and temps are always changing and I'm either adding or removing layers. I have never fallen in the water (knock on wood) but I also would never unzip a one piece dry suit to vent while on the water, if you fell in it would be sheer disaster let alone any water that came into your suit while on the rib, good luck getting it out.

As posted earlier and very true, you can wear the most expensive high end kit possible but if the seals (neck, chest....etc) are open or leak then you will open yourself to an unpleasant experience when spray, rain or waves come. Some of the worst experiences I've had just came from hours of light cold drizzle trying to drip into your suit.

Make sure you do your research/homework on the shell material if it's not official name brand 3 layer Gore-Tex. Their are a lot of knock-off breathable fabrics that look tough, some good but a lot are not up to par; they either don't breathe well or not up to the abuse and start to delam and break down quickly but it will take a year or so to do so.

Having a good dry suit is key, there are many good ones out there that come out of the kayaking world and sailing world. I love my Musto MPX and worth every penny but now rarely ever use it.
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