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Old 04 March 2006, 18:52   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Kennett
I think it's a pretty good comparison actually.

Likewise a good RIB, driven well, can manage to get through some quite remarkable seas in safety and possibly even comfortably.

John
I agree that RIBs are able to get through remarkable seas. The problem is that if your engine fails and you are in an open boat in "remarkable seas" you are at the mercy of the elements. Is this "safe".The boat may float but it is only a matter of time before you die of exposure. If you take a "Chelsea tractor" for a trip on the moors and get stuck in a ditch the likelhood is that you can walk home with no assistace from others. I suppose it depends on how you view "ribbing". I like to go out on calm days and minimise the chance of me being exposed to life threatening conditions. I think that planned ribbing in force 6 conditions represents an extreme sport.
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Old 04 March 2006, 18:55   #32
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..Still no substitute for elephants trunks though. The achilles heel of trunks, of course, is that they only work if you've remembered to lower them! One modification I would really like on our RIB is a remote release...
I've being going to experiment with a bit of buoyancy at the neck of my drain drunks, just enough to keep the open end afloat. Once the boat is planing, it should drain as normal.

While we're talking about this, I've mentioned a few times about having a radius on the inside of the drain hole, I'll do one of me wee drawings to show why and start a thread.
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Old 04 March 2006, 19:00   #33
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Originally Posted by Andre
Well said RW. Dog is a great pal of mine and he is the one responsible for my getting into ribbing. Dog only runs his special courses during the winter months cos then is the "best weather" for such. I was due to have an extreme ribbing one last weekend but unfortunately it was cancelled
Due to "Calm" weather I bet Andre

First of all, I'm glad you're all safe. I hope these first experiences haven't put you off.

My little RIB is prone to the Stuffing, I've had her filled to the brim of the tubes at least 2 times. What I have noticed is that when full to the brim, performance drops off considerably due to the increased weight. I go off the plane and this plus the extra weight of the water forces the elephants trunk under the surface of the water stopping fast draining of the deck.

As this was never really too much of a problem before (due to a low transom) I am having the transom raised in a couple of weeks. Might be worth putting a "rough weather" self bailer a little higher in the transom to assist the draining process if this happens again.

Anyone else had this problem?
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Old 05 March 2006, 01:51   #34
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Adding my two penny worth. I have had water (that solid green no vision down the neck over the console type of water) a couple of times and had no problem with a single elephant truck and a minute or so running with the nose up. However, got a wave over the side and transom when coming into Mudeford a few weeks ago. Scary - strange looking down at the deck through six or eight inches of water. Again, walking promptly to the back, dropping the trunk, and two mins on the plane cleared it.

BTW if you get that horrid foreknowlege of an immediate impending stuff, full throttle (strongly counterintuitive) on the opti gets my bow so far up it mitigates the problem.
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Old 05 March 2006, 03:11   #35
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul
I agree that RIBs are able to get through remarkable seas. The problem is that if your engine fails and you are in an open boat in "remarkable seas" you are at the mercy of the elements. Is this "safe".
It may or may not be safe depending on the conditions and location. It's certainly not a situation to be taken lightly though
Quote:
The boat may float but it is only a matter of time before you die of exposure. If you take a "Chelsea tractor" for a trip on the moors and get stuck in a ditch the likelhood is that you can walk home with no assistace from others.
That would depend on the conditions and the location too. Whether off roading or boating in difficult conditions it's generally better to go it in company so that you can help each other out if things get tricky.
Quote:
I suppose it depends on how you view "ribbing". I like to go out on calm days and minimise the chance of me being exposed to life threatening conditions. I think that planned ribbing in force 6 conditions represents an extreme sport.
That's fine.

Whilst there may be some who think that having a RIB makes them invincible, I think that most people here know better. Those that start off that way tend to have a reality check quite quickly.

Every time you go boating you need to weigh up the risks and decide whether you find them acceptable or not. Different people like to do different things.

John
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Old 05 March 2006, 06:23   #36
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Originally Posted by ct01
Have to agree with Polwart Richard - sorry, trying going though the Alderney Swinge when its on form; you can have any course and rating you like, the water simply opens up in front of you and there is bugger all you can do but hang on.
We went through some good overfalls in the Swinge two years ago. Our 31' yacht was going backwards down the face of the overfalls!
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Old 05 March 2006, 06:35   #37
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Originally Posted by Richard B
Eggzackterley!

Only a frightened man with a bucket could ever compete

Out of interest, have you ever filled Scorpio up with water since, err, the first cross-channel you did in her?
Yes, twice. Not as full as the other time, but at least half-way up the bench seat. Just had to wait for the bilge pumps to do their thing. Steve Banks who owns Sea Hound IV suffers the same problem and we are investigating somehow fitting decent scuppers. It is going to be very difficult due to the original construction. BTW, if anyone ever questions a Scorpion, as you know we have proved it unsinkable. I know, I know, that's what they said about the Titanic!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Andy Moore
We went through some good overfalls in the Swinge two years ago. Our 31' yacht was going backwards down the face of the overfalls!
Tell me about it, its a sight to behold. Perfect place to brush up on your helming skills.
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Old 05 March 2006, 14:32   #38
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Thanks very much for all replies. I've concluded three things:

i. Go on a training course and improve my "feel" for conditions.
ii. Raise the electrics in the engine bay and improve water protection
iii. As I enjoy rough water I need to find a way to drain the boat more effectively probably with drains through the underseat locker, bulkhead and transom and elephant trunks - anyone know a boatyard I could trust to do the job near Poole?
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Old 05 March 2006, 14:44   #39
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Originally Posted by ct01
Yes, twice. Not as full as the other time, but at least half-way up the bench seat. Just had to wait for the bilge pumps to do their thing. Steve Banks who owns Sea Hound IV suffers the same problem and we are investigating somehow fitting decent scuppers. It is going to be very difficult due to the original construction. BTW, if anyone ever questions a Scorpion, as you know we have proved it unsinkable. I know, I know, that's what they said about the Titanic!



Tell me about it, its a sight to behold. Perfect place to brush up on your helming skills.
We have a scorpion and i have wondered about how the boat would shift water in a big stuff, do the small drain plugs realy work, or as we did on our Cobra Carry a buckett.
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Old 05 March 2006, 15:20   #40
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Im in the process of replacing my ball type bailers with \elephant trunks.
can the trunks be left down while afloat, or do they need to be hooked up.
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