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Old 04 March 2006, 14:47   #21
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Firstly I am glad you are OK, Cold isn't it

Cobra's do stuff and I don't really thik they are a boat for tough seas.....inboard or outboard! (that's Ribeye, Cobra's and Falcon owners who all hate me now)

Re the training ......yeah get some more the profession could do with the extra work, but I doubt if the rough water section of the advanced course is going to train you for the conditions you were in. ( i.e if it isn't that rough on the day of your course then where are the conditons going to come from. My advice is if you have to go out there in the rough then take a Buddy and his boat.)

There are a couple of rough weather skools over on the East coast. I think the guy that runs them is Dog Phillips

good luck next time.
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Old 04 March 2006, 14:54   #22
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I think a lot of this is down to design we had a Cobra 7.5 i could fill both sides of a A4 paper with faults the most important being the draining
like why do they put the battery in the in the stern next to the tube and in front of a drain exit. We had to do so much work moving batterys sealing the front lockers etc.etc.
Just glad to hear that no one was hurt, you can always replace the boat.
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Old 04 March 2006, 16:51   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart
I accept what you say about (1) driver training and (2) boat design as being big factors.
But that wasn't what I said, was it
Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn
I am suprised at the Scorpion not having proper drains...
Be aware that Charles' boat is more like a sportsboat than a RIB - it has raised sides and a windshield, so it's not as open as most RIBs. http://www.biboatheribclub.co.uk/ima...o_ecrehous.jpg. Our Scorpion is much different, being fairly "traditional" in design, and benefiting from a low transom so that opening the throttle will displace all but the last few gallons from the boat. The elephant's trunk will quickly displace the remaining water, leaving the bilge pump at the lowest point to take the last few drops. One innovation of Graham's newer RIBs is the addition of a sump below the floor. Two "plugholes" in the deck allow water to drain into this GRP moulding where it's pumped out from. (I don't know if Charles' RIB has this). Still no substitute for elephants trunks though. The achilles heel of trunks, of course, is that they only work if you've remembered to lower them! One modification I would really like on our RIB is a remote release
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Old 04 March 2006, 16:57   #24
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People talk about RIBs as the 4x4 of the sea. This incident suggests to me that they are not. Despite everyones criticisms an 8.5m Cobra is a large RIB and likely to be as competant as any other large RIB although I accept the importance of being able to scupper inboard water easily. At the end of the day RIBs (even big ones) are a open boats, they may be very unlikely to sink, but if they "conk out" or capsize then your life is at risk. Reports that I have read about RIBs being used in very heavy weather have often resulted in technical failure/breakages. Should we not be using these boats in calm weather and relying upon there undoubted "reserve seaworthiness" if we are unlucky enough to need it as a result of an inaccurate weather forecast/misjudgement.
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Old 04 March 2006, 16:58   #25
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See what you mean - seems the lower the transom the better - or even to do away with it altogether - shame the MCA don't see it that way when you want to code a boat!!!
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Old 04 March 2006, 17:04   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rogue Wave
There are a couple of rough weather skools over on the East coast. I think the guy that runs them is Dog Phillips

good luck next time.
Well said RW. Dog is a great pal of mine and he is the one responsible for my getting into ribbing. Dog only runs his special courses during the winter months cos then is the "best weather" for such. I was due to have an extreme ribbing one last weekend but unfortunately it was cancelled
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Old 04 March 2006, 17:10   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul
RIBs being used in very heavy weather have often resulted in technical failure/breakages. Should we not be using these boats in calm weather and relying upon there undoubted "reserve seaworthiness" if we are unlucky enough to need it as a result of an inaccurate weather forecast/misjudgement.
Very valid points. Rough weather does put you at the mercy of the elements if your equipment fails, and a large element of seamanship is balancing the risks. Inaccurate weather forecasts will always be a risk, but this can be mitigated by using more than one source, and evaluating forecasts by looking at the raw data from sites such as www.ecmwf.int. No point in moaning about the forecaster being "wrong" as it's your own life! When all's said and done, it's your own choice to go out, but I always prefer to make sure I'll be coming back under my own propulsion!
Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn
seems the lower the transom the better - or even to do away with it altogether...
Not necessarily... Having a low transom does have some advantages, quick draining is one of them, and another is the low C of G from a low engine mounting, but the biggest disadvantage is that reversing into waves gets you wet!
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Old 04 March 2006, 17:21   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul
People talk about RIBs as the 4x4 of the sea. This incident suggests to me that they are not.
I think it's a pretty good comparison actually.

A well equipped 4x4, driven well, can get across some incredible terrain. It doesn't mean that you can cross the Darian Gap in a Chelsea tractor though.

Likewise a good RIB, driven well, can manage to get through some quite remarkable seas in safety and possibly even comfortably. That doesn't mean that just because it's a RIB you can go absolutely anywhere in any conditions.

John
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Old 04 March 2006, 18:14   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard B
One innovation of Graham's newer RIBs is the addition of a sump below the floor. Two "plugholes" in the deck allow water to drain into this GRP moulding where it's pumped out from. (I don't know if Charles' RIB has this).
It is. Don't know if its an innovation though - IMO anything electrically operated can go wrong, or fail altogether - how do you get the water out then?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard B
Still no substitute for elephants trunks though. The achilles heel of trunks, of course, is that they only work if you've remembered to lower them! One modification I would really like on our RIB is a remote release
Could not agree more.
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Old 04 March 2006, 18:20   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ct01
IMO anything electrically operated can go wrong, or fail altogether - how do you get the water out then?
Eggzackterley!

Only a frightened man with a bucket could ever compete

Out of interest, have you ever filled Scorpio up with water since, err, the first cross-channel you did in her?
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