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Old 22 August 2007, 16:36   #1
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Can't believe I did this ...!

I have owned power boats for over 20 years, so you would think that I should have a rough idea how to handle one.

Well ... it just goes to show ...

My daughter and made a trip to Poole in "interesting" conditions about 3 weekends ago. When we arrived at Cobbs Quay Marina, we were directed to a berth that turned out to have another boat on it.

No problem, I called up the marina on the VHF and was given another berth. Its location meant that I needed to do a 3-point turn in order to be facing in the right direction. During this period, a "School" boat appears and I imagine that the skipper might have said something like "watch this boat go into its mooring - he looks like he ought to know what he is doing "

I then proceeded to enter the newly designated berth and my daughter jumped onto the pontoon and secured the bow to the relevant cleat.

There was a strong wind (F6) blowing me off the berth, so I turned the helm, looked at the end of the pontoon (in expectation of getting closer) and gave a short blast of astern power to bring in the stern. What a shame I didn't check which way the outboard was pointing first!

Instead of the stern being brought into the berth, like I have done hundreds of times before, Aries IV - aided by several knots of wind - was propelled rapidly towards the neighbouring boat!

Fortunately, we bounced off without damage to either boat. The guys in the training boat fell about laughing - and who can blame them?

The obvious moral is - remember to check which way the outboard is pointing before going into gear!

I thought I'd share that with you.

Chris.
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Old 22 August 2007, 16:42   #2
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I honestly dont think they have invented the boat owner who has never goofed putting his boat onto a mooring at some stage in his/her career.

Years ago, (with a biggish motorboat) I was coming onto our pontoon at Sparkes Marina (notoriously tight marina if you dont know it). Made a real hash of it but ended up leaping the 5 foot gap clutching a mooring rope and secured the boat.

We had a new pontoon neighbour who had seen it all, and he popped his head out of his boat and grinned.

"Sorry" I said "I dont normally make such a bad job of it".

"Listen" came the reply "The definition of a successful mooring is - no damage to any boats - and no injuries to any crew".

I've always remembered that, and it does put things in perspective a little. Its great to get a real "greaser" and end up exactly where you want at zero knots per hour. But it doesnt always happen............
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Old 22 August 2007, 16:48   #3
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Of course there is another angle. We were coming into Northney and everything was fine and then one of our crew decided to be helpful and show us the way to tie up along side with one bit of rope in the middle but somehow managed to drop the rope in the water - nearly around the propellor, Pat steers the boat in such a way as to miss the rope and instead hits the pontoon - lesson number 2 - do it your own way and let smart arses show you when you are tied up along side!!!!
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Old 23 August 2007, 04:54   #4
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After years of having outboards I now have a inboard, which makes life a lot harder as you can not see where it is pointing!!
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Old 23 August 2007, 04:59   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peterb View Post
"The definition of a successful mooring is - no damage to any boats - and no injuries to any crew".
Ah is that why we all have boats with fenders built in
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Old 23 August 2007, 05:26   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by peterb View Post
Its great to get a real "greaser" and end up exactly where you want at zero knots per hour. But it doesnt always happen............
Only happens when there is absolutely no one about to see it!

Tony
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Old 23 August 2007, 07:39   #7
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Originally Posted by peterb View Post
Its great to get a real "greaser" and end up exactly where you want at zero knots per hour. But it doesnt always happen............
Makes you feel damn good when it does happen though - but as said there is usually only an audience when it goes wrong! A bit like recovering the boat, if there is somebody watching you usually miss the trailer and have to go back for another go or two or three. Only once have I got it spot on with an audience, zipped up the trailer under power, dead straight, a satisfying "thump" against the bow bracket, engine up, hop out and walk up the drawbar feeling very pleased with myself. More often than this it involves several lots of gear selection and swearing... or if it goes perfectly there is nobody watching
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Old 23 August 2007, 07:51   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Murray View Post
I have owned power boats for over 20 years, so you would think that I should have a rough idea how to handle one.

Well ... it just goes to show ...

My daughter and made a trip to Poole in "interesting" conditions about 3 weekends ago. When we arrived at Cobbs Quay Marina, we were directed to a berth that turned out to have another boat on it.

No problem, I called up the marina on the VHF and was given another berth. Its location meant that I needed to do a 3-point turn in order to be facing in the right direction. During this period, a "School" boat appears and I imagine that the skipper might have said something like "watch this boat go into its mooring - he looks like he ought to know what he is doing "

I then proceeded to enter the newly designated berth and my daughter jumped onto the pontoon and secured the bow to the relevant cleat.

There was a strong wind (F6) blowing me off the berth, so I turned the helm, looked at the end of the pontoon (in expectation of getting closer) and gave a short blast of astern power to bring in the stern. What a shame I didn't check which way the outboard was pointing first!

Instead of the stern being brought into the berth, like I have done hundreds of times before, Aries IV - aided by several knots of wind - was propelled rapidly towards the neighbouring boat!

Fortunately, we bounced off without damage to either boat. The guys in the training boat fell about laughing - and who can blame them?

The obvious moral is - remember to check which way the outboard is pointing before going into gear!

I thought I'd share that with you.

Chris.
My neighbour in the marina uses the boat as floating caravan,very very rarely have I ever seen it move.

Last year after a full day preperation, he decided he was going for it! It's a 34ft power boat, he managed to get it facing the right way then roared out the marina.


About 1/2 hour later came back in, ,he's bobbing up and down on the flybridge like a parrot,the wife's on the bow she's bending the knees getting ready to throw the rope,(shouting all the time at one and other).

his speed was way too slow, so started to get blown about....so he gave it the beans,.... the next thing is she shouting woah woah!! Oh Davy we're up on the platoon!! She meant pontoon. I managed to get the line from her before the boat slid back into the water.

Large Whiskys all round.
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Old 23 August 2007, 07:56   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nick Hearne View Post
After years of having outboards I now have a inboard, which makes life a lot harder as you can not see where it is pointing!!
Yes!

In keeping with the theme of the thread, I did the same thing but when leaving the berth. I had forgotten that the engine was left hard to port when I set off. Gave it a bit of throttle expecting to come gliding out of the berth and bumped into my neighbour on the starboard side. No real damage but a lesson learnt, straighten up the helm before you switch off.
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Old 23 August 2007, 08:33   #10
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Ive done the same thing with a bowrider we once had. approaching the end of the jetty to collect partner & kids after rowing out to collect the boat. The current in the hamble is strong, felt the boat being pushed onto the end of the jetty so gave it a blip of throttle. The wheel was hard over and the stearn swung round smacking the corner of the jetty putting large hole is the port quarter of the boat. I start to take on water and can hear all the spare life jackets in the under seat locker being set off!!

Had to head at full throttle on to the mud banks where upon 1/2 the boat yard came to have a look/laugh/help!!!

The best bit?? ................... Had just paid to have the boat in the used boat show to sell her!!!
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