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Old 28 July 2010, 18:33   #1
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Can you help the RNLI with feedback on SEA Check please

I am a Lifeboat Sea Safety Officer (LSSO) who is a member of a working party set up by RNLI Sea Safety to review the organisation's SEA Check together with how we promote and market the scheme.

One of the the remits of this review is to get feed back from as many boat owners as possible, so I would very be grateful if you could spend a few moments to answer the following questions:-

1. Have you had an RNLI SEA Check - do you have any suggestions on how it may be improved?

2. If not, have you previously heard of RNLI SEA Check?

3. If you have heard of SEA Check but not had one, what has stopped you?


All feed back will be taken into account, but all comments will go into the review anonymously - so please be as open and frank as possible with your answers - if you would rather your answer was not public, please feel free to answer via PM.

As I said, we want to get feed back from as many boaters as possible so if you have any boat owning friends who have any comments, please feel free to add those in as well.

On behalf of the RNLI, thank you very much for your time.

In the meantime if anyone would like to arrange a SEA Check, please let me know the location of your boat and I will PM the contact details of your nearest LSSO.
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Old 28 July 2010, 18:55   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RNLI Sea Safety View Post
1. Have you had an RNLI SEA Check - do you have any suggestions on how it may be improved?
Not had one
Quote:
2. If not, have you previously heard of RNLI SEA Check?
yes
Quote:
3. If you have heard of SEA Check but not had one, what has stopped you?
Firstly I think there is a perception that these are really for yachts / larger boats rather than "open day boats". However if I am honest there are probably some other reasons:

(1) I know there are possibly some weaknesses in my "safety" armory, where it at least falls short of best practice. My personal "risk assessment" says that these are risks I understand and will possibly improve on when time or funds allow but right now I am happy to accept. I don't want to be made to feel guilty for not addressing those weaknesses now.

(2) This might sound a bit arrogant, but I don't really expect them to tell me anything I don't already know so it will be a waste of my time and theirs. Of course I may be missing an unknown risk, but I think from RYA courses, here, the MAIB reports, and magazines - I'm familiar with the things most likely to go wrong.

(3) I've never met a Sea Safety adviser in person, so this sweeping generalisation is purely an "expectation": anyone who chooses to spend their time going round "nit picking" other peoples safety arrangements is likely to be an 'elf and safety type person - which may not be the sort of person I would chose to spend my leisure time with. I'm sure they are not (or not all) like that.
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Old 28 July 2010, 19:30   #3
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Polwart,

The SEA Safety advisors are friendly people, the reason i became a Sea Safety Advisor is to help people and give something back to the community...

Not living in a live boat station town, prevented me from every being Crew, so being a SEA check advisor, is my way in giving something to the sport that I enjoy.

We do not lecture, a SEA check is just friendly chat, i have learnt things from doing SEA checks.

You will be surprised that how few people who do not get training, register the boat on CG66 etc, if you want to a SEA check I meet you at your boat and do one myself...

Working in a stall last year i was asked, "how do you contact the coastguard in Emergency!" my answer was 999.

A SEA check might actually put your mind at ease, that piece of safety equipment you might think is essential is NOT really essential because the type of boating you do.

You should look at the Sea check as a one to one talk with an RIB netter...they are quite a few LSSO's & SEA check Advisors floating around on RIB.net...a lot of them are RYA Instructors or Trainers.

If you come to Elie on the 7th August you meet at least two SEA check advisors myself and Linda , LSSO of Broughtyferry Lifeboat Station.

If anybody wants a SEA check in Fife, PM me...

regards

Scott


The New RNLI Sea Safety Guide can be downloaded:RNLI Complete Guide and the accompanying CD can be downloaded from: http://www.rnlimedia.org.uk/completeguideair/
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Old 29 July 2010, 01:03   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart View Post
anyone who chooses to spend their time going round "nit picking" other peoples safety arrangements is likely to be an 'elf and safety type person - which may not be the sort of person I would chose to spend my leisure time with. I'm sure they are not (or not all) like that.
Polwart, I think that in your case you are right - you are well informed and a SEA Check would probably not benefit you a great deal (except maybe to find out that the Sea Safety guys are advisers, not auditors).

For the benefit of readers who may not know this, a SEA Check (not available to commercial users, it's for leisure boaters only) does not have a Pass or Fail outcome, it's simply a friendly discussion about safety on board your own boat.

Cards on the table ... I have an interest to declare. I am the LSSO for Oban Lifeboat Station, so my opinion is biased! However, I would be rather concerned if I thought that my team were nit picking or making anyone feel guilty about their safety arrangements. There are 5 of us here at Oban and between us we have over 100 years of experience crewing lifeboats at different stations, as well as our personal boating backgrounds. We've seen (too often) the consequences of a lack of knowledge and our intention is simply to share our experience with others and sometimes - as you say - to help people know what they don't know. We've talked to 400 or so people this year so far and the overwhelming feedback we get is that what we do has been helpful. At Oban we don't do a great deal of SEA Checks, it tends to be more ad-hoc discussions about various safety aspects with boaters, and in a number of cases, we learn something ourselves through the process.

In my view, and I think this would be shared by the other LSSOs I know, the lifeboat service must be accessible, approachable, and supportive. If people start to think that we might judge them or make them feel guilty about contacting us for help (either for a Sea Safety chat or for a rescue) ... we're getting something wrong. I'm sorry that something we've done, or maybe not done, has created the wrong impression with you and I hope you're in a small minority. If you're up in our neck of the woods sometime, we'd be very happy to do a SEA Check with you (not that I think you need one, just so that you can find out what it's really like!).

Ian
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Old 29 July 2010, 02:45   #5
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Scott / Ian,

This might warrant spltting into a separate thread so it can stay "on-topic" for the OP. He want's to know about perceptions not the "facts". I'd suggest people are more likely to give their perceptions if they don't think they are likely to be told immediately that their perception is wrong.

NEIL
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Old 29 July 2010, 03:56   #6
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I think the sea check would be of much more use to the average "ebay special" owner that we get round here at weekends than the average well informed boater who generally has a clue about what could go wrong and what kit to carry. These people often go out with no safety kit what so ever and are totally oblivious to what the potential dangers are. Generally I suspect they're the sorts of people that don't get training or read boaty publications.
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Old 29 July 2010, 03:59   #7
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Neil - your first post was a brilliant answer, probably the best we've had so far - as you say above, it's perceptions we're after, whether they're right or wrong is immaterial, if people have wrong perceptions, it's what this review of SEA Check is aimed at addressing.

We have no problem if people are critical of SEA Check or praiseworthy in this thread - it's what people think that counts for the purposes of this survey.

If misconceptions of what SEA Check is or isn't crop up in posts I will address them all when the thread appears to be at the end of it's life - I don't want to address any as we go as it may skew subsequent answers.
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Old 29 July 2010, 04:19   #8
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I think the people who use sea safety are generally the people who are safety conscious, granted they will benefit from it but not as much as other.
I know the following would take up alot of time but have an LSSO at a slipway asking people if they wanted a check or making them aware of what should be carried might get the message across to more people.
Yesterday afternoon a boat called the CG to see if he and his crew were ok to have a few cans whilst out on a fishing trip!
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Old 29 July 2010, 05:36   #9
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Yesterday afternoon a boat called the CG to see if he and his crew were ok to have a few cans whilst out on a fishing trip!
That's outrageous! Surely any experienced dayfisher skipper would be aware that this is Mandatory?
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Old 29 July 2010, 05:38   #10
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That's outrageous! Surely any experienced dayfisher skipper would be aware that this is Mandatory?
Thats what I thought the live bait well was for, less risky than dangling them over the side.
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