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Old 13 May 2016, 06:16   #1
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Cabin boats with open foredeck

Hypothetical and maybe stupid question:

I was reading a review in PBR on a fantastic looking boat called the Anytec 747 which is an aluminium cabin boat but with an open foredeck area.

Not specific to this boat, but I wondered what happens on boats with this sort of layout (where the bow area is isolated from the cabin/stern) if you stuff it into a wave and completely fill up the foredeck? There seemed to be no obvious/visible high capacity drainage (short of opening the cabin door!) and I've noticed the same on other boats with a similar layout - no apparent high capacity drains appear to be visible. I presume there is something hidden somewhere but it isn't obvious.

Suddenly having a few tonnes of water arrive in the bow must have a serious effect on the boat's stability in rough conditions and would take a bit of removing - so there must be an explanation, I just wondered what it is?
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Old 13 May 2016, 08:02   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BogMonster View Post
Hypothetical and maybe stupid question:

I was reading a review in PBR on a fantastic looking boat called the Anytec 747 which is an aluminium cabin boat but with an open foredeck area.

Not specific to this boat, but I wondered what happens on boats with this sort of layout (where the bow area is isolated from the cabin/stern) if you stuff it into a wave and completely fill up the foredeck? There seemed to be no obvious/visible high capacity drainage (short of opening the cabin door!) and I've noticed the same on other boats with a similar layout - no apparent high capacity drains appear to be visible. I presume there is something hidden somewhere but it isn't obvious.

Suddenly having a few tonnes of water arrive in the bow must have a serious effect on the boat's stability in rough conditions and would take a bit of removing - so there must be an explanation, I just wondered what it is?

Stuffing any RIB is best avoided the bigger it is the more of an issue I would think!
It's all down to manufactures design...you either like/suits your needs or not.

Plenty of RIBs without Cabins I've seen have Consuls so wide you have to climb onto and over the Tubes to get to the Bow!...not ideal at the best of times...If it's blowing/rough and you have to deploy an Anchor in a hurry I'd imagine it's a real hassel and could potentially cause real problems.
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Old 13 May 2016, 08:20   #3
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Interesting question. I don't know about the hard boats but on our Parker 900 & 1000 Cabin rib and Baltic Cruiser there are two drain outlets on the foredeck which drain the water down back into the sea, say rain water or should one stuff etc, see photo of the hull drain outlets. I do not have a photo of the deck drain arrangement
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Old 13 May 2016, 09:26   #4
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Not my preferred way of design, but guess if drainage is really big, should be OK.

This boat sunk due to taking in water over the bow in combination whit too small drainage holes and probably bad seamanship... Everybody was rescued though.

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Old 13 May 2016, 10:33   #5
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They appear to have drains out through the hull. I presume there is enough buoyancy below deck to keep draining the deck in the event of a stuff? Maybe...

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Old 13 May 2016, 11:25   #6
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[QUOTE=C-NUMB;715721]Not my preferred way of design, but guess if drainage is really big, should be OK.

This boat sunk due to taking in water over the bow in combination whit too small drainage holes and probably bad seamanship... Everybody was rescued though.

end of quote



perhaps not your way but it works for us and we have made many such cabin ribs. the one in the photo operates off the West coast of the UK
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Old 13 May 2016, 12:07   #7
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[QUOTE=Andre;715729]
Quote:
Originally Posted by C-NUMB View Post
Not my preferred way of design, but guess if drainage is really big, should be OK.

This boat sunk due to taking in water over the bow in combination whit too small drainage holes and probably bad seamanship... Everybody was rescued though.

end of quote



perhaps not your way but it works for us and we have made many such cabin ribs. the one in the photo operates off the West coast of the UK
The rib in picture have a nice high bow and huge amount of flotation(tubes) at the right position in case a bad stuff. Pretty sure it would manage to recover even with the unlikely event of the whole forward compartment filled with water. This is something i would not want to try in most hard boats. Still if i had one, would be paranoid having large enough drains.
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Old 13 May 2016, 12:10   #8
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RIBs and inflatables have a lot more buoyancy in the bow, and of course all around. This is what makes them such safe sea boats. Of course, the bigger the scuppers the better when operating in heavy weather.

I believe those boats are made in Sweden and desingned for use within the archipelago rather than offshore. Aluminium is great when navigating waters that have a lot of uncharted rocks etc.
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Old 13 May 2016, 16:23   #9
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Not my preferred way of design, but guess if drainage is really big, should be OK.

This boat sunk due to taking in water over the bow in combination whit too small drainage holes and probably bad seamanship... Everybody was rescued though.


Wow - amazing how quickly that went down!

Thanks for the replies. I was just curious - not knocking that design of boat, and the Anytec looks really smart and had a very good review.
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