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Old 11 November 2003, 16:43   #11
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Ive seen quite alot of sailing clubs do that with the trailers. When there bringing the boats off the water every night i supose it makes sense.

I will consider it for the trailer on my new rib. but the only times it is relly usefull is when the tide is rushign past pushign the boat of the bottom rollers.
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Old 12 November 2003, 09:57   #12
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Agree with all of above.

Some years ago, a friend use to retrieve his 6.5m in a novel way:

The slip he used was quite steep, (Hobs Point in Pembrokeshire), he would reverse the trailer to the waters edge, he would then edge the boat onto the 1st roller, then once a crowd was watching, he would throttle up and trim at the same time. The boat would launch it's self up the trailer. A another would then attach the winch cable.

He never did admitt how many goes it took him to perfect this move.
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Old 12 November 2003, 10:08   #13
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Something similar features on the RYA level 2 Powerbaot handling video shot under the Itchen bridge. Bloke lines the boat up and just drives it on giving a faultless demo. I use that clip to show students don't you dare do this! slight cross wind or tide and the boat misses, roller shafts catch the grp and a nice big scrape. fishing waders and lots of people are the safe answer but yes you can drive her on.

Pete
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Old 12 November 2003, 11:44   #14
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Quote:
Originally posted by Pete7
fishing waders and lots of people are the safe answer but yes you can drive her on.

Pete
Hi pete,

Yep got that from you and have also found, the hard way, that if the trailer is in too deep the keel can catch between the rollers at the back when the trailer is pulled out. I now have a bungy to keep the rear rollers tilted forward which now stops that.


Paul
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Old 14 November 2003, 18:51   #15
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or occasionaly like this
http://rib.net/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=1218

Must grab a quick couple of hours sleep now and then off to the Dive Show early morning - oo-er, all that rubber
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Old 14 November 2003, 22:07   #16
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salt is the issue?

Just an idea, but isn't the concern more about how much you want salt getting into your axle bearings and/or brakes than whether you tug or drive onto the trailer? (Bearing Buddies are good, but not perfect.) In my opinion, if your boat can take the stress, leave your trailer axles out of the salt and winch the boat on. Fresh water is not as much of a concern; salt in bearings and every nook and cranny on your trailer sucks! john
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Old 16 November 2003, 17:11   #17
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When it goes in the sea which on some ramps is unavoidable we take the grommet out of the back of the brake drum and stick a pipe in it to flush out with fresh water. Not the complete answer but it does help some. And with trailer brake shoes at around 50 a wheel I like to give 'em all the help I can.
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Old 17 November 2003, 05:37   #18
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Thanks for that piece of advice Dave,
we hose down trailer & boat every time and leave the brake off while stored, but still have times when the brakes seem to stick.
would never had occurred to me! so will have to give it try

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Old 17 November 2003, 06:14   #19
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I think the other thing with trailer brakes is to remember that it is not a car! Dont adjust them as you would with a car in that they are just off when not actually braking. The shoes need some travel to make them work and stretch the springs so that when you stop braking there is something there to pull'em off again and to get em well clear of the drum. Otherwise when the metal flake in the lining rusts- as it will & as does the inside of the drum- it will rust itself to the drum and hey presto the buggers are stuck solid again If they do stick we find the effective way out is to clout the end of the wheel studs with a hammer as they are bolted into the drum and will give a direct shock to jar them off. Don't go mad and crack the drum though cos you'll need a mortgage to buy one I would gess!
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Old 17 November 2003, 06:57   #20
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Quote:
Originally posted by wavelength
we find the effective way out is to clout the end of the wheel studs with a hammer
You may find that it works for you, but I really, really, don't recommend it. In my (direct and bitter) experience it just wrecks the stud and doesn't free the drum off!

The method that I have had most success with is jacking the offending wheel then tapping the back of the drum. If that fails, take the wheel off and tap the front of the drum itself. It sounds like a lot of work, but so long as you have a jack and a wheelbrace to hand it won't take more than a few minutes.

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