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Old 10 April 2007, 09:24   #21
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Cheers guys....I thought it was a valid question- anyway back to the point of the thread..... ''''''IF''''''' you were by chance caught out in bad conditions-what sort of RIB would u feel most comfortable in?
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Old 10 April 2007, 09:49   #22
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Basically the bigger the better.

Big fat tubes - upswept bow - no transom so the water just pours out of the back.

In shallow water/surf a jet drive - in deep water a deep leg or even shafts.

Ocean Dynamics
http://www.mustangmarine.com/ribwork...olio/index.htm

Humber/Quinquari
http://www.quinquarimarine.co.uk/6.html

Delta
http://www.deltapower.co.uk/deltapower.html

Redbay
http://www.redbayboats.com/ribs/stormforce.htm

Funnily enough the best rough sea RIBs aren't exactly pretty!!!

This yellow Ocean Dynamics is the one I would like the most for our shallow waters. Also shown one of their older boats.
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Old 10 April 2007, 09:57   #23
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Thanks for all that info Codprawn! I am looking at Ribcraft.... all their boats above the 4.8 length are B coded. Which is hopefully all i would ever need! Have u had any experience with Ribcraft?
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Old 10 April 2007, 09:58   #24
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Basically the bigger the better.
Nope not covinced. Assuming your not crossing the Atlantic and there is reasonable hope of reaching a safe harbour within a few hours then I would choose something 6-7m with good power to weight ratio rather than a big slow diesel. that way you are able to drive around the waves accelerate up and down them and react quickly to breaking waves. What you want is the equivalent to sports car not an old lorry. However this assumes that the driver has the experience to drive a boat in those conditions.

Pete
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Old 10 April 2007, 10:02   #25
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Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
Basically the bigger the better.

Big fat tubes - upswept bow - no transom so the water just pours out of the back.

In shallow water/surf a jet drive - in deep water a deep leg or even shafts.

Ocean Dynamics
http://www.mustangmarine.com/ribwork...olio/index.htm

Humber/Quinquari
http://www.quinquarimarine.co.uk/6.html

Delta
http://www.deltapower.co.uk/deltapower.html

Redbay
http://www.redbayboats.com/ribs/stormforce.htm

Funnily enough the best rough sea RIBs aren't exactly pretty!!!

This yellow Ocean Dynamics is the one I would like the most for our shallow waters. Also shown one of their older boats.

Plus

http://www.parkerribs.com

Extremely pleased with my Parker 900 Baltic, have had it out in some really rough seas and it's not put a foot wrong so more than happy to recommend it. Also upto 65 hours now and have not had one fault with the rib in any shape form or other.
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Old 10 April 2007, 10:19   #26
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Thanks for all that info Codprawn! I am looking at Ribcraft.... all their boats above the 4.8 length are B coded. Which is hopefully all i would ever need! Have u had any experience with Ribcraft?
DJL did an impressive return trip from Weymouth in a 4.8m Ribcraft in difficult conditions a couple of years ago. Its down to experience and taking your time. You might only be travelling at 8-9 knots but with care you will get there safely. Its the crew that give up first rather than the boat, although ancillaries can be a weak point leading into the accident pit. The lose of the GPS won't sink the rib, but if you have no other navigation system on board you could be in trouble.

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Old 10 April 2007, 10:33   #27
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DJL did an impressive return trip from Weymouth in a 4.8m Ribcraft in difficult conditions a couple of years ago. Its down to experience and taking your time. You might only be travelling at 8-9 knots but with care you will get there safely. Its the crew that give up first rather than the boat, although ancillaries can be a weak point leading into the accident pit. The lose of the GPS won't sink the rib, but if you have no other navigation system on board you could be in trouble.

Pete
yeah i understand what you mean....Experience is obviously the deciding factor..... I think i want something quite small- which is why the ribcraft 4.8 or 5.3s or quite appealing...And apparently they are reliable! When on a poweboat course with Jono Garton's company (who were fantastic) we got into a bit of a rough patch coming out of Porthmadog marina-between the sandbanks... Would have been really hairy if we were without an instructor onboard.
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Old 10 April 2007, 10:40   #28
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.... all their boats above the 4.8 length are B coded. Which is hopefully all i would ever need!

Be very very carefull about CE coding - it is pretty much self certificating - look at some of the Italian coding of RIBs and shouldn't be looked at as anything other than a rough guide! It certainly doesn't take into account hull shapes etc.

I am not implying any particular makes are wrongly coded of course!
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When a boat looks that good who needs tubes!!!
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Old 10 April 2007, 11:27   #29
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Plus

http://www.parkerribs.com

Extremely pleased with my Parker 900 Baltic, have had it out in some really rough seas and it's not put a foot wrong so more than happy to recommend it. Also upto 65 hours now and have not had one fault with the rib in any shape form or other.

Of course how could I forget?

I am also very impressed with my own boat!!!
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Old 10 April 2007, 11:29   #30
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Nope not covinced. Assuming your not crossing the Atlantic and there is reasonable hope of reaching a safe harbour within a few hours then I would choose something 6-7m with good power to weight ratio rather than a big slow diesel. that way you are able to drive around the waves accelerate up and down them and react quickly to breaking waves. What you want is the equivalent to sports car not an old lorry. However this assumes that the driver has the experience to drive a boat in those conditions.

Pete
A lot depends on the conditions. I think you definitely lose the fun factor the bigger you go but in extreme conditions the big old lorry will keep plodding on.

Having said that zapcats cope pretty well in the surf!!!
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