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Old 08 May 2015, 15:39   #21
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The main cause of the injury was that the passenger was not holding on to the correct hand holds (she had one hand on the lifeline on the tube) .
Funnily enough, I'm just going through a similar process of placing a handhold. The low down position & narrow grip afforded by the front hand hold was next to useless. She was probably better off using the life line as it allowed her to spread her arms & describe a triangle, thus giving better support.
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Old 08 May 2015, 15:49   #22
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I think the reason the report stated that the lifeline was one of the reasons she was injured was due to the fact to hold on to it she was no long sitting (or standing) upright on the seat and was more leaning towards the tube so she could get a hold of the lifeline, the reason she went for the lifeline in the first place was entirely due to the fact that the front handholds provided she could not grip properly.

Just to bring this thread back round to the original question again whats the best layout and positioning of jockey seats and how do we ensure that those who decide to ignore the safety briefing given by the skipper and not do as instructed are still at a low risk of injury?
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Old 08 May 2015, 16:13   #23
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IMO only any of us could get injured when we go out 😕 if you hit a wave wrong or similar, some things are just bad luck
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Old 08 May 2015, 16:17   #24
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Originally Posted by Sam G View Post
Just to bring this thread back round to the original question again whats the best layout and positioning of jockey seats and how do we ensure that those who decide to ignore the safety briefing given by the skipper and not do as instructed are still at a low risk of injury?
That's much more to the point. My take on this is that if PAX get injured, they'll successfully sue you. You MAY be able to apportion SOME blame to them, but you'll still lose overall. So the remedy is not to injure them. I'd say being very particular about who you allow to board is important, but in this day and age, it's a losing battle. So good seating and handholds are important, as is ensuring that people feel OK about telling you they feel uncomfortable. On the infamous US "hook" video you see the PAX getting increasingly unhappy and yet no-one calls Timeout. This is where the safety brief is vital as it sets the "tone" for the trip. If RIBs are making 35kt thrill rides, then ultimately people are going to get injured - it's just a matter of when. RIBs operating commercially in Irland Sud are not permitted to exceed 25kts. So basically, thrill rides are verboten..., no matter where or how you install your PAX. IMO, it all comes down to good briefing and very careful driving. Also very good communication with PAX and an understanding of people.
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Old 08 May 2015, 16:40   #25
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So with regards to a seating layout important factors are good foot grip, good hand grip even if the passenger is cold, good back support and a well cushioned seat. As well as ideally a crewman monitoring the passenegers and a very easy to understand but thorough safety briefing before departure, topped off with some professional boat handling at appropriate speeds
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Old 08 May 2015, 16:42   #26
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So with regards to a seating layout important factors are good foot grip, good hand grip even if the passenger is cold, good back support and a well cushioned seat. As well as ideally a crewman monitoring the passenegers and a very easy to understand but thorough safety briefing before departure, topped off with some professional boat handling at appropriate speeds
Sounds like a recipe for Success to me
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Old 08 May 2015, 16:43   #27
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sorry for the late entry but only got back from the cinema where i saw the movie SPOOKS. excellent movie and can highly recommend it

I see I have your attention

firstly i did not post the best example as the photos which i posted were taken before 2008 and we like others also had low grab handle for the front passengers. There was a similar problem in Poland in 2007 which we addressed by fitting as standard a high grab handle see attached photo. A high grab handle is the safer option. The person is not bent forward only sitting up with good back support. the grab handle is in easy reach,

as for the two rows of jockey seats then i cannot see how one can comfortably and safely support his back and at the same time hold on to the grab handle on the seat in front. why have single seats why not have a row of seats on one pod where they are closer to each other . Side wings are for sure great and many of you guys have them and can confirm they do keep you in the seat.

The enquiry was started by a future operator so he should now have a better idea of the for and against jockey / bench seats. I am speaking from experience and have sold quite a few such ribs and have also helped in the improvement of the range.

even at 25 knots you need to be safe and comfortable and the so called "white knuckle rides " do not have to be done at speeds above 35 knots. the operators want the clients to enjoy the rides , have fun and come back for more and not to end up in A & E

the seat cushion should not be too wide as it would be very uncomfortable for the standing position and many like to stand
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Old 08 May 2015, 17:02   #28
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...but the seats are rubbish every single one of them and I would go further and even say unsafe especially the front ones..... Not a good idea to post that photo
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firstly i did not post the best example as the photos
...and yet you felt that I was at fault for posting similar? Reeks of double standards surely Andre?
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as for the two rows of jockey seats then i cannot see how one can comfortably and safely support his back and at the same time hold on to the grab handle on the seat in front. why have single seats why not have a row of seats on one pod where they are closer to each other
Because PAX will knock their heads together? Side wings are great of course, if used correctly, but if the back is not forced into them, they can cause injury if oblique contact is made. Been there, got the bruises

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The enquiry was started by a future operator so he should now have a better idea of the for and against jockey / bench seats. I am speaking from experience and have sold quite a few such ribs and have also helped in the improvement of the range.
And I'm sure he'll benefit from your experience. That said, I have something to contribute too.
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even at 25 knots you need to be safe and comfortable and the so called "white knuckle rides " do not have to be done at speeds above 35 knots. the operators want the clients to enjoy the rides , have fun and come back for more and not to end up in A & E
Amen! Personally I think Operator behaviour has as much/more relevance than deck hardware.
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Old 08 May 2015, 17:11   #29
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Willk, I will end my comments here as you and I will never see eye to eye .
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Old 08 May 2015, 17:20   #30
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sorry for the late entry but only got back from the cinema where i saw the movie SPOOKS. excellent movie and can highly recommend it

I see I have your attention

firstly i did not post the best example as the photos which i posted were taken before 2008 and we like others also had low grab handle for the front passengers. There was a similar problem in Poland in 2007 which we addressed by fitting as standard a high grab handle see attached photo. A high grab handle is the safer option. The person is not bent forward only sitting up with good back support. the grab handle is in easy reach,

as for the two rows of jockey seats then i cannot see how one can comfortably and safely support his back and at the same time hold on to the grab handle on the seat in front. why have single seats why not have a row of seats on one pod where they are closer to each other . Side wings are for sure great and many of you guys have them and can confirm they do keep you in the seat.

The enquiry was started by a future operator so he should now have a better idea of the for and against jockey / bench seats. I am speaking from experience and have sold quite a few such ribs and have also helped in the improvement of the range.

even at 25 knots you need to be safe and comfortable and the so called "white knuckle rides " do not have to be done at speeds above 35 knots. the operators want the clients to enjoy the rides , have fun and come back for more and not to end up in A & E

the seat cushion should not be too wide as it would be very uncomfortable for the standing position and many like to stand

Get a rough passage on those seats and pax are going to be losing some teeth look a bit close for my liking
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