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Old 06 August 2016, 17:04   #1
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Bayrunner 550 vs. Futura MK III vs Classic MK II

Hey all,

I need some help figuring out which boat is going to fit the bill, and not leave me feeling like I should've really bought something else

First and foremost, it has to be able to live on a trailer. There's no way I can go back to disassembling and re-assembling the boat every time. I have my reservations about a SIB with a 50-60hp outboard on the back, especially when stored away for November through March. Do you have to consistently top the boat off with air so the transom doesn't sag down with the engine, or is it safe to park it and forget it for the winter with the right trailer?

It also needs to carry 4 adults comfortably. If it seats or holds more, great, but four total is the minimum. The Cadet 350 ALU that I had before was a bit small inside for my taste.

Excellent performance and versatility are a must. There's only room for one boat in my budget one boat that's fast and agile enough to be a blast to bomb around in for the day is really what I'm looking for at the end of the day. Being able to weave around larger craft safely and easily like I was in the Cadet 350 in tight channels like the Chicago River is a huge plus.

Hoping for some input from the RibNet veterans on this. The boats that've caught my attention are the Bayrunner 550, Futura Mark 3, Classic Mark 2 HD, and Cadet RIB 390. I can't seem to get any information on the Cadet RIB 390 which is odd. I think the Bayrunner 550 is my top choice right now, but I'm interested to hear what the more experienced inflatable crowd has to say
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Old 06 August 2016, 19:14   #2
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Bayrunner 550 vs. Futura MK III vs Classic MK II

The is a big range if boats. The Cadet 390 is probably not going to have much more room than what you have now. The Futura and classic are very nice boats but I would not recommend leaving it assembled on a trailer all winter unless it is going to be kept inside. The pressure needs to be kept up so that it does not strain the tubes and transom.
The Bayrunners are very nice boats but the 550 has no room in the front with the sideways bench seats. If you can swing the larger rib it will perform better and not leave you wanting to move up to a larger boat again soon.
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Old 07 August 2016, 02:58   #3
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I have never seen Bayrunner on my eyes.
But after looking at this video it looks for me like it has not really deep V. So it is more for rivers, bays.

If you want to jump sometimes to place with waves why not consider Zodiac PRO Open 550 for example ?

About keeping on trailer. I have ETEC EVINRUDE which you can put (yourself) in Winterization state. And I keep boat under double PVC cover.
Just put PVC pipe between mast and console and console and bow.
It looks like big tent. I secure also air flow from bow to engine

Not sure about temperatures in your area but here in Poland we have few weeks with -20 C usually (during Winter, usually in Jan/Feb)



And I use below mentioned equipment to release stress from axle and wheels
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Old 07 August 2016, 10:59   #4
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It wasn't really the winterization aspect I'm worried about, it was more about whether SIB's have the structural integrity to be stored trailered with larger outboards affixed to the transom through the winter.

It sounds like you cannot do this???
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Old 07 August 2016, 11:14   #5
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You can, but there needs to be bunks under the transom and a transom saver needs to be used. Basically, you don't want any "pulling" on the joints while the boat is on a trailer.

You could always order a Bayrunner 550 without the front seats.

Although I would recommend a Pro Open or Rec Pro.
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Old 07 August 2016, 11:32   #6
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One of the benefit of these items (sorry do not know proper English name)



Is that trailer is higher than normally and engine can be in lower possible position



I do not plan to keep engine separately (never).

Generally I keep boat on trailer and for longer periods I use these items to release stress from wheel and axles and keep engine in lower position.

For other periods engine is on special "trailering brackets" (standard in ETEC)
When tow to Greece (2500 km) it s also on the brackets.

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Old 08 August 2016, 17:08   #7
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Is anyone able to give a good rundown of how the Bayrunner 550 and Pro Open 550 differ? The seating and console style are obviously pretty different, but how do their inherent performance/operating qualities truly differ due to varying hull and tube design? Is a Pro Open 550 really going to handle four-foot waves that much better than a Bayrunner 550? Are passengers up front in a Bayrunner 550 going to regret coming aboard in seas above 2-foot if I'm only operating at 20-25mph? I'm trying to gauge what exactly its limits are before things start becoming *too* uncomfortable for passengers. The premium in price for a Pro Open 550 over a BR550 is not negligible, I want to be sure it's worth the jump in cost.

The Bayrunner 550 seems to have a much more "fun" seating layout that's better suited to cruising the shoreline, which is the majority of my boating, I don't ever go "offshore". The most serious of seas I take on is the Lake Michigan Chicago shoreline. But, Michigan can turn into 3-4 foot seas from calm in the same day, and the removable sundeck cushion up front in the P/O 550 doesn't look bad at all... Decisions....
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Old 08 August 2016, 18:39   #8
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The Pro Open and Pro 550 hulls are slightly different.

The Pro Open has a larger tube diameter and a more aggressive bow profile.

Both platforms are more than capable of handling a small craft advisory (4 ft'ers), but the layout of the Pro Open is going to be less fatiguing on the operator. You don't want that shock traveling up your lower back and spine... It's really uncomfortable.

The Bayrunner 550 is designed as a people mover and fun boat for a low price. The hull is capable of some serious weather conditions

All North American pro hulls have 0% wood and are bonded with methacrylate... Methyacrylate is amazing stuff. They use it to bond aircraft components as a secondary bond on critical parts. It has a modulus of about 70,000 psi... Way overkill for a GRP hull.

The hull can take it. But it really comes down to operator comfort.
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Old 09 August 2016, 16:01   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by office888 View Post
The Pro Open and Pro 550 hulls are slightly different.

The Pro Open has a larger tube diameter and a more aggressive bow profile.

Both platforms are more than capable of handling a small craft advisory (4 ft'ers), but the layout of the Pro Open is going to be less fatiguing on the operator. You don't want that shock traveling up your lower back and spine... It's really uncomfortable.

The Bayrunner 550 is designed as a people mover and fun boat for a low price. The hull is capable of some serious weather conditions

All North American pro hulls have 0% wood and are bonded with methacrylate... Methyacrylate is amazing stuff. They use it to bond aircraft components as a secondary bond on critical parts. It has a modulus of about 70,000 psi... Way overkill for a GRP hull.

The hull can take it. But it really comes down to operator comfort.

This might seem like a silly question, but can "upgraded" seat cushions on the BR550 stock benches mitigate that problem? I'm not sure if the vinyl shells can be re-filled with a more shock absorbant cushioning material, or if custom cushions could be made to make it more chop friendly on passengers??

At what severity of wave condition would the Pro Open 550 become *that* much more preferable over the Bayrunner 550? I'd really like to know if four-foot seas would begin to justify the price premium of a Pro Open, or if it'd just mostly end up being overkill.
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Old 09 August 2016, 16:48   #10
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I love my 550 pro tour, it's used to head offshore chassing game fish in sea conditition much bigger glass or aluminium boats don't head out in.

I've just done an average trip away towing my boat just over 6500 km, a big trip is more than double that. Much of our towing is on unsealed road ( mud tracks) and all I use is the outboard locking bracket as shown in above pics.

My outfit isn't going to break any speed records but cruises at 4500 rpm with a stainless Solas 13 pitch prop at 40 kmh and burns less than 1 lt per 3 km ( top speed 56 kmh). This is the second boat I've owned with a Yamaha f70 and love them, I've also owned Suzuki and Mercury 4 strokes but prefer Yamaha. I've done close to 300 hrs on the engine in 12 months.

Jon

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