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Old 10 January 2010, 11:35   #1
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Auxilliary Outboard yes or no?

Hi Guys
i have a nice little 17ft Dory.
it has radio, flares, horn etc,

i also have fitted an auxilliary 5hp engine, aside from the main engine.
the main engine is in very good, serviced condition.

what are your thoughts on the auxilliary? i know its a belt and braces emergency engine, but do people usually have them on thier boats? or do you think them not really necissary?

i dont go out to sea far, keep to the coast mainly. and thinking of this engine just sat there. i wonder if its really worth the bother


any thoughts?


thanks
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Old 10 January 2010, 11:56   #2
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Mmmm

It's a quandry, of course having one when you need it is best, but...

We had a 6.6 on a 18ft rib and it rattled around in the rough and imbalances the boat at speed. We never used it (thank god) and only cruised the coast, an anchor and paddles seemed sufficient so took it off.

Now we have a 6.3m rib and go a little further. Brand new engine and radio etc now and haven't fitted it ....yet! I suppose the bigger boat is impossible to paddle to shore though and the weight probably won't imbalance it much. Fixed properly to the transom it may not rattle too much...still debating it.

There's an arguement both ways. Up to you in the end.
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Old 10 January 2010, 11:57   #3
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[It's always usefull to count with a auxiliary motor in case main dies, specially if you don't have any mate close to help you, won't plane your boat, but will take you home...
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Old 10 January 2010, 12:34   #4
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Ooooo, this is a marmite issue. Be careful!

Have a search of the site for Auxialliary and punch-up, that should help.

Some people swear by an extra engine, others cannot see the sense. Both camps feel quite strongly about it too.

Personally I am an auxiliary free boater, but there have been times when I have succumbed.

It all depends on your own boating criteria really. You need a list of essential kit and if you are like me you will not be able to afford everything so you end up deciding which is more important. For example a really good anchor, perhaps a sea anchor too. Spare radio, good flares, perhaps a tool kit for some.

If you do go down the aux route then try and get the same stroke as your main engine, but also make sure you have separate fuel and fuel line for it so that you can mix and match depending on possible fuel problems.

You will also want to take into account the conditions you are likely to encounter, a very small aux is not going to help if you regularly face big tides or areas of chop.
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Old 10 January 2010, 12:47   #5
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Auxilliary Outboard

Better safe than sorry.
My last engine (evinrude 225) went kaput in the harbour not far from the slip, not a problem I thought.
I just broke out the paddles and we tried the Hawaii five 0 thing, less than 10 mins later we were all "sweating like geordies in a spelling test" and had made little or no headway against the small current, (a 7.5m rib with 200litres of fuel 1/4 ton of dead engine, dive kit and all other "essentials" weighs a lot).
I managed to secure a tow from a passing samaritan.

Aux bracket now fitted and I "borrow" my dad's little put put when ever I go out.

Lee
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Old 10 January 2010, 13:31   #6
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Thanks for the replies,
and really not surprised by the answers.

i like the extra radio suggestion, that way if you get a massive power faliure and your onboard set packs up, you have a spare.

i do already have an auxiliary, but truly wonder if its going to do much in an emergency. a 5hp engine is not going to push a ton of boat that well! (i think??)

perhaps i should try!!!! LOL!
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Old 10 January 2010, 14:16   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by markymarkP View Post
... perhaps i should try!!!! LOL!
Don't laugh! You should try, and do so on something other than a flat calm day too.
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Old 10 January 2010, 14:29   #8
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My vote is to keep the auxilliary. I have a brand new engine on the back and used it without a backup all summer. It left me with a nagging doubt about what I would do in the case of engine failure. Fitted the auxilliary in October, a 5HP Honda which I had in the garage anyway. I would recommend trying out your auxilliary, I was surprised how well mine pushed my 6m RIB along.

Part of all this is about where you use your RIB, but where I am based on the West Coast of Scotland having a "get me home" on the back is to my mind essential and certainly gives a great deal of peace of mind.
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Old 10 January 2010, 14:37   #9
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From my experience I would say keep it. If engine failure you will be able to get back under your own power and not have to be towed like I did. Believe me, it's embarrasing when lots of people that you know see you trying to paddel to safety
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Old 10 January 2010, 16:48   #10
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RIBase
Here in Greece almost everybody over 5 metres ( that they cannot paddle) cary an auxiliry engine.
I dont realy like very much to carry a second engine having a new engine as main.
So...... i have a very good sea anchor ready for use at the bow, and I have a small torqeedo, 801 for the peace of mind, not to be totaly enginless. I am getting 2,8 3 knots in good weather if ever needed . 8 kilos at stern is not so bad.
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