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Old 22 October 2004, 08:45   #31
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Simon, whilst I agree with the principle of the point you're making, you've changed your argument!

You originally said:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Hawkins
...check that it has not been pierced by the fireing mechanism...
but now you say that:
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Hawkins
...I have seen where the gas cylinder has been pierced, but the firing mechanism is still in tact
Have you investigated the reason for these "failures"?

Is it possible that:
a) The lifejacket has been actuated manually by the pull-cord? (on a salt-tablet jacket, the salt tablet would be visibly ok wouldn't it, although if I remember correctly some of their mechanisms have a red/green indicator which may be actuated by the manual pull. On a "Hammar" type jacket, the mechanism would indicate "fired")
b) A used CO2 canister has been mistakenly fitted?
c) Debris in the assembly has damaged the top of the cylinder?
d) Manufacturing defect in the firing mechanism?
e) Manufacturing defect in the cylinder?

Given that you've stated "pierced" rather than just a leak (which may be almost invisible?) then this would seem to rule out c and e.

Whilst an RNLI leaflet is useful I'm sure, Tim, I would rather fully understand the operation of my lifejacket and be able to evaluate the value of generic information which may or may not be applicable to the type I use.
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Old 22 October 2004, 08:56   #32
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard B
Whilst an RNLI leaflet is useful I'm sure, Tim, I would rather fully understand the operation of my lifejacket and be able to evaluate the value of generic information which may or may not be applicable to the type I use.

RYA Sea Survival Course 9 Oct 04
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Old 22 October 2004, 15:00   #33
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One very big problem with gas lifejackets is the cylinder working itself loose up the threads so that the firing pin is out of range when fired or that much of the gas escapes. On one occassion when doing sea safety checks, I came across three in a row, two loose and one with the cylinder completely detached !! All gas jacket cylinders need to be checked very regularly. It would be interesting if ribnet members checked their jackets and posted how many loose or detached cylinders were found.


Jon
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Old 22 October 2004, 15:14   #34
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Nice one, Cork RIB... been itching to get out of my chair and do this all afternoon!

1. Crewsaver hammar auto, 4-years old, never checked before, about 1/32nd of a turn to tight.
2. Crewsaver freedom hammar 2-years old, 15months since cylinder and actuator replacement, fully tight.
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Old 22 October 2004, 15:33   #35
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Testing Lifejackets

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cork Rib
One very big problem with gas lifejackets is the cylinder working itself loose up the threads so that the firing pin is out of range when fired or that much of the gas escapes. On one occassion when doing sea safety checks, I came across three in a row, two loose and one with the cylinder completely detached !! All gas jacket cylinders need to be checked very regularly. It would be interesting if ribnet members checked their jackets and posted how many loose or detached cylinders were found.


Jon
It would also be a good idea to orally inflate your jackets and see which ones hold air overnight.

Did this with my 5 this spring - 2 went down and so went to Crewsaver for a proper service and repair.
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Old 22 October 2004, 17:26   #36
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Cheers, Duncan - you may just have saved my life!
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Old 23 October 2004, 06:32   #37
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No doubt mentioned before but which is best to have - auto or manual? I would have thought auto cos if you get thrown overboard and knoecked out you will still float - others say that if the RIB capsises and you are stuck underneath the last thing you want is an inflated lifejacket - any comments please???
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Old 23 October 2004, 10:56   #38
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My choice is for automatic as I reckon that the chances of ending up under a capsized hull are much less than the chances of being dazed, disorientated and suffering from thermal shock to the degree that the toggle just doesn't get pulled.

It's only a lifejacket when it's inflated!

John
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Old 23 October 2004, 13:30   #39
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That's what I thought - and far more likely to be thrown clear than stuck underneath - I suppose the faster you go the further you will be thrown clear!!!
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Old 25 October 2004, 09:26   #40
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There was a case in the offshore siesmic industry a few years ago then auto life jakets cost the lives of two people when they got trapped inside a cabin on a work boat when it inverted. The crew on deck survied.

I use a manual for inshore or safety boat work and an auto for offshore trips.

I think the type Nick was refering too with the plastic color and blotting paper top and bottom is a salt tablet type, Secumar and I think the early crewsaver autos used different mechanisums but very similar tablets.
rgsd
James
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