Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 21 October 2004, 06:02   #21
Administrator
 
John Kennett's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Brighton
Length: 3m +
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 6,830
Quote:
Originally Posted by Louise
One type uses a salt tablet which triggers the jacket to inflate when it dissolves. This kind can occasionally go off when you don't want it to, e.g. if the lifejacket gets very wet. Just ask Mr Kennett...

The other 'hammar' type works by water pressure so is not likely to inflate 'accidentally'.
I have had passengers' lifejackets inflate twice. Each was caused by very substantial amounts of water cascading into the boat. Interestingly one was a conventional auto lifejacket, the other was a Hammar -- on neither occasion did my lifejacket inflate as I was hiding behind the console at the time!

I would have no hesitation in chosing the cheaper conventional type over the more expensive Hammar as I don't think that the advantages are particularly significant.

The cheaper type do fire occasionally if left soaking wet in the boot of a car for a week or so, but that's no way to treat essential safety gear anyway.

Crewsaver products tend to be made of heavier material and have a more robust feel. Definitely worth the extra money if you are going to be using them every day. For leisure use the cheaper ones are absolutely sufficient. I have six XM brand auto jackets that we have been using for years with no problems.

John
__________________

__________________
John Kennett is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 21 October 2004, 06:32   #22
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Bristol
Make: QuickSilver 3.4m
Length: 3m +
Engine: Mariner Outboard 5hp
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 22
Send a message via MSN to chaskins Send a message via Yahoo to chaskins
Thanks again everyone for your thoughts and advice.

I have certainly learned great deal

Thanks

Chris
__________________

__________________
chaskins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 October 2004, 03:46   #23
Member
 
Country: UK - Channel Islands
Town: Guernsey
Boat name: Charger
Make: Prosport
Length: 7m +
Engine: Yam 200HP OB
Join Date: Jul 2004
Posts: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard B
R U sure? I think that only the date label on the pressure device tells this. The coloured indicator only indicates whether the device has fired or not if I remember correctly.
Hmm, no I'm not now you come to mention it. I just remember reading in the instructions that there were three different indicators, green, red/green and red, but I guess if its been set off then it needs to be replaced, which is different to indicating when it needs to be replaced, if you get what I mean!!
__________________
Squirrel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 October 2004, 05:43   #24
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Cowes
Boat name: Tabby Cat
Make: Halmatic
Length: 7m +
Engine: 2 x Yamaha 115
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 388
Quote:
Originally Posted by Squirrel
Hmm, no I'm not now you come to mention it. I just remember reading in the instructions that there were three different indicators, green, red/green and red, but I guess if its been set off then it needs to be replaced, which is different to indicating when it needs to be replaced, if you get what I mean!!
Instead of relying on the indicators why not unscrew the gas canister and check that it has not been pierced by the fireing mechanism as it may of been used and then manually deflated and repacked.
__________________
Simon Hawkins
http://www.rnli.org.uk/cowes
Simon Hawkins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 October 2004, 05:57   #25
Member
 
Richard B's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Devon
Boat name: White Ice
Make: Ranieri
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki 115hp
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 5,015
Simon, this isn't necessary. The indicator is part of the firing mechanism and so will definitely indicate red if it has fired.

I thought you would have know this from using the Crewsaver life jackets that the RNLI supply.
Richard B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 October 2004, 06:50   #26
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Poole
Make: Humber - Ocean Pro
Length: 6m +
Engine: 200 Mariner Optimax
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 92
Am I being stupid here or are there at least three types of auto jacket.
1)Hammar
2)Salt Crystal
3)'Blotting Paper type'

I have a Compass 275n Auto which has been set off a couple of times by mistake (long story). I had it recharged by someone else the first time but did it myself the second. The 'release' machanism consists of two plastic rings inside each other, one smaller than the other with what looks and feels like densly folded blotting paper holding the two together. When the paper gets soggy, it releases the inner ring releasing the spring loaded spike and firing it into the CO2 cylinder.

Or am I getting horribly confused?

Nick
__________________
Nickytynick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 October 2004, 06:56   #27
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Cowes
Boat name: Tabby Cat
Make: Halmatic
Length: 7m +
Engine: 2 x Yamaha 115
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 388
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard B
Simon, this isn't necessary. The indicator is part of the firing mechanism and so will definitely indicate red if it has fired.

I thought you would have know this from using the Crewsaver life jackets that the RNLI supply.
Richard

Of course I know that but surely isnt it best to check the cannister as if it has a whole in it then surely this is absolute proof that the jacket has been fired. Why take chances unneccesarily !!
__________________
Simon Hawkins
http://www.rnli.org.uk/cowes
Simon Hawkins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 October 2004, 07:41   #28
Member
 
Richard B's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Devon
Boat name: White Ice
Make: Ranieri
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki 115hp
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 5,015
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Hawkins
absolute proof that the jacket has been fired...
- is provided by the red/green indicator!

The firing mechanism covers the top of the CO2 cylinder. So as long as it's assembled reasonably carefully without debris, the only way that it can be pierced is by the firing mechanism actuating (manually or automatically). Because the red/green indicator is attached to the mechanism, you can see the status of this. The only problem that I can perceive is if someone reassembles the whole thing after firing, using a new firing mechanism and a used CO2 bottle. This might be a concern for shared use of a lifejacket, but not for my personal lifejacket.
Richard B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 October 2004, 07:43   #29
Trade member
 
tim griffin's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Newport IoW
Boat name: Amean/Pronto/Rumbo
Make: Solent Rib Princess
Length: 7m +
Engine: 200hp Etec 260x 2
MMSI: lots of them
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 1,859
I think Simon is making a very valid point , we should all check our lifejacket cannisters on a regular basis , in fact the RNLI will send you a leaflet on how to maintain your lifejacket free call 0800 328 0600 its very informative
all the best
__________________
Tim Griffin
RYA Freelance YMI power Powerboat and PWC instructor trainer vhf first aid sea survival Diesel engine radar and navigation instructor
tim griffin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 October 2004, 08:03   #30
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Cowes
Boat name: Tabby Cat
Make: Halmatic
Length: 7m +
Engine: 2 x Yamaha 115
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 388
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard B
- is provided by the red/green indicator!

The firing mechanism covers the top of the CO2 cylinder. So as long as it's assembled reasonably carefully without debris, the only way that it can be pierced is by the firing mechanism actuating (manually or automatically). Because the red/green indicator is attached to the mechanism, you can see the status of this. The only problem that I can perceive is if someone reassembles the whole thing after firing, using a new firing mechanism and a used CO2 bottle. This might be a concern for shared use of a lifejacket, but not for my personal lifejacket.
You would be amazed how many lifejackets I have seen where the gas cylinder has been pierced, but the firing mechanism is still in tact. I personally know that my lifejackets have not been fired but if I was to use someone elses lifejacket then I would check the cannister. Their is no point checking it after you end up in the water and it not inflating the jacket. The point which I am trying to get across is that dont trust other peoples lifejackets without giving them a thorough checking over.
__________________

__________________
Simon Hawkins
http://www.rnli.org.uk/cowes
Simon Hawkins is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 18:29.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.