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Old 02 April 2003, 07:57   #11
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that is a good point
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Old 02 April 2003, 10:49   #12
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please explain

what is this Hammar mechanism business , as the more expensive jackets promote this fact so are they better ?

the ocean passage looks to be a good bet with hood , light, etc ?
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Old 02 April 2003, 11:13   #13
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Who makes the Ocean Passage jacket?
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Old 02 April 2003, 12:40   #14
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Re: please explain

Quote:
Originally posted by matiboy
what is this Hammar mechanism business , as the more expensive jackets promote this fact so are they better ?

the ocean passage looks to be a good bet with hood , light, etc ?
Hammar is this hydrostatic idea. They are activated by water pressure so don't go off when splashed.

There have been a few incidents where Hammar life jackets haven't been activated. It seems that you have to fall in the right way for a Hammar to go off - not something you have control over when propelled out of a boat at 30kts!

I would find a normal water activated life jacket which has a pocket over the firing mechanism to stop it getting wet under normal conditions. See picture
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Old 02 April 2003, 12:50   #15
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Matiboy that looks like Narked wearing that Ocean passage Jacket?

Cant find the make or model on the net.
Maybe not that well known Brand?

Im still looking for the life jacket road tests,some of them that looked good were crap.Will get back to you.

I didnt realise that different makes of jacket had different arming kits?I thought that they in the main used standard gas 150n/250n bottles with same threads?.
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Old 02 April 2003, 13:52   #16
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I cant find the Tests,I do know there was one that was as good as the Crewsaver in all the tests and was a lot cheaper.
I think it was Baltic or XM but dont know for sure so dont quote me.

I am sure we got a good deal on these top of the range crewsavers with all the bits for two at arround £200.00 but we trawled arround with the tests in our hands and chipped the dealers down at the Southampton boat show,where they were considerably cheaper.

On the hammer question,I thought that a gas bottle was a gas bottle and fitted all reputable makes,maybe I am wrong and if you need different arming kits then it would be sensible to stick with one make.

The Jacket with all the bits the ocean passage,I would find out who the maker is and get feedback on them first from the net as if they have a good name then fine ,but if they are known for ifi stuff or eeven unheard of,it puts you in a better position to make a more informed decision.

In my case I would recommend Crewsaver,not cheap but I am happy.There are otheres that are good and cheaper,but I cant tell you what they are unless I find the Road test,that tested some 15 odd auto inflate life jackets,last yr.

Good luck
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Old 02 April 2003, 13:54   #17
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what you should know

according to compass24 website about lifejackets

http://www.compass24.com/templates/i...ungswesten.htm

Classification according to EU standards - Lifejackets are subdivided into different buoyancy classes. The criterion for this is the minimum support force, or buoyancy, expressed in Newtons (N). EU standards 396 and 399 also cover a certain level of safety for unconscious persons, meaning that the jacket buoyancy is distributed so that an unconscious person is quickly turned onto their back, face up. The buoyancy level in these standards relates to a person weighing 70 kgs, thus the actual buoyancy of lifejackets in the same class can in fact vary depending on the weight of the wearer. If in doubt, always go for a jacket in the next class up to be on the safe side. The standards stipulate that the automatic inflation mechanism should be triggered within 10 seconds of immersion in water.

EN 393 - 50 N buoyancy aid
For use by good swimmers in safe waters only as long as assistance is at hand. Not safe for unconscious persons..
EN 395 – 100 N
Lifejacket suitable for adults and children who are swimmers for use in inland waters and safe areas. Only limited protection for unconscious persons, depending on clothing.
EN 396 – 150 N
lifejacket for swimmers and non-swimmers, for all waters. Only limited protection for unconscious persons wearing heavy waterproof clothing or in extreme sea states.
EN 399 – 275 N
Lifejacket for offshore use and extreme conditions. Immediate protection for unconscious persons, with turnover guaranteed within 5 seconds. Adequate buoyancy even with heavy clothing.


Service - Keep to the manufacturer’s recommended servicing intervals, as only regular inspection will ensure that the lifejacket functions properly in an emergency. You should have your lifejackets checked by an authorised agent who has the necessary equipment for testing the bladder and inflation mechanism and can issue the requisite test certificate.

Compass can organise servicing for you – send us your lifejacket and we’ll get it checked by the manufacturer in the minimum of time.


Rearming kit - A rearming kit should always be kept on board for use after an emergency. In any case, it makes sense to do a "test run" once in a while and inflate the jacket while wearing it, ideally prior to winter servicing. Don’t spare the expense of a kit – your safety is more important than the cost of a cartridge – and make sure you get the right kit, as manufacturers supply different gas cylinders for different models and only the correct one will fit. When inserting a new tablet, check that no bits of the old one remain in the mechanism; the tablet compartment should be completely clean and dry. After replacing cartridges/tablets, work through the manufacturer’s checklist to ensure proper functioning.

Every crew member needs their own personal lifejacket that should be comfortable yet secure and suitable for the conditions in which it is used. The shape of the buoyancy aid, especially the cut of the neck, and safe and easy operation of the lifebelt are important for handling and fit.

A good cut is essential for a comfortable fit. The weight of the jacket should be evenly distributed to the shoulders as well as the neck. A closed V section not only makes it easier to don the jacket, but also increases comfort. The neck should be free and the jacket should lie flat. Short "bolero" cut jackets with a lifebelt that sits high on the chest give greater freedom of movement.

The best lifebelt fastener designs include mushroom- or anchor-type fasteners and also good “plug-in” systems. Adjustment of the lifebelt should be sufficiently easy for it to be readjustable using one hand even in the water. You should practise operating the lifebelt mechanism and ensure that other persons sailing with you are familiar with it too.


The lifejacket should have a basic setting and be kept on board where it can be accessed rapidly in an emergency. Practise putting it on and operating and adjusting the lifebelt until you can do it quickly.

Once put on, a lifejacket should fit closely to the upper body, with the lifebelt positioned roughly above the breastbone and adjusted so that a hand can pass between the belt fastener and the breastbone. In practice jackets tend to be worn too loose, which can significantly worsen the position of an unconscious person in the water. When changing clothes, for example after putting on heavy oilies, you should always readjust the lifejacket.

Tips for emergency situations

If you fall into the water, attract attention immediately either by blowing the whistle or by means of the light on the lifejacket.
Check and adjust the lifejacket. If necessary, top up the air by blowing into the valve to increase the buoyancy.
Draw clothing around you as tightly as possible – pull on hat or spray-hood to protect your head.
Do not remove restrictive clothing or boots, and adopt the "embryo" position to conserve body heat and prevent overcooling.
Keep arms close to the body and draw legs up slightly.
Avoid any unnecessary movement, as this will displace water already heated by the body.






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Old 02 April 2003, 14:12   #18
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This reminds me of the FAST show Today I will be wearing mostly Ocean Safety Lifejackets.

I have made the mistake of coming out of my boat at over 60 m.p.h. and from quite a height. Fortunately I wasn't knocked out and deployed my manual jacket and swam-ish backstroke to my Bucking Bronco which was grazing some 100 or so yards away.

However I was pleased that all my safety systems did kick in
and I was able to recover myself to the boat. I was using an Ocean safety manual jacket, with strobe n whistle.

I am short, stocky. fat and obviously dense (17st plus) the jacket pulled me out of the water and I was in the right position and that's the way I stayed. so from experience they get my vote

I hit the water quite hard and somewhere in the process my kill cord was removed from my leg, fortunately after it was removed from the ignition system. I had a spare in the bottles. but most importantly I didn't get KO'd but I'll put that down to luck

So from experience I really wouldn't go further than Ocean Safety for a lifejacket and I now wear an Automatic I think it's called a Commodore.

You can also get good deals on good jackets from Marine scene and All gadgets

Hope that helps

re the usin a manual jacket so that you dive in and rescue your victims. have I got it wrong I thought you were supposed to take the boat to the casualty
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Old 02 April 2003, 14:50   #19
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Whatever you use make sure they are in good order. I did a test for a fishing mag donkeys years ago which centered around the effects of wearing waders at sea, as many of our anglers do. Jumped in swimmng pool with my local sub aqua club blew up the rather old lifejacket which had been rummaged out for the test and leaned back with my arms crossed over the jacket.All was fine until with a bit of a pop the oral inflation valve blew out of the inflator pipe and landed on the pool side! The lifejacket went down immediatly
Speaking of anglers most of them (and me in the ribs) use floatation suits in winter. Nice and warm due to foam buoyancy distributed around the suit, and the advantage that once you are dressed for sea you are wearing a buoyancy aid. I stress buoyancy aid cos unlike a lifejacket they will not roll you onto your back if unconscious, but I have done mag test on them and they certainly keep you afloat and fairly mobile in that you can swim reasonably. Few of our anglers wear lifejackets except when I have em on courses but they virtually all wear floatation suits.
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Old 02 April 2003, 15:02   #20
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Wavehumper your quit right in your situation you are best on the boat for rescues.

Unless you have been trained for it and you have the trained crew on board and all the MOB equipment and you have wayed up the situation very carefully, then to attempt to swim to a casuality is not recomended for those in any doubt.

There are could however be times when a manual inflatable jacket could be of benefit to me personely.

For all you wanted to know about Hammer and auto inflate heads see http://www.crewsaver.co.uk/leisure2/...ries.html#ham3 It will give you an idea of what you want.

Hammer is a trade mark and its the same inflate head I think on your proposed Ocean Passage jacket,maybe same re arm kit?.
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