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Old 20 September 2004, 13:24   #1
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Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Ardnamurchan
Make: Domar Corsair
Length: 4m +
Engine: Mercury 20HP
MMSI: What?
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Are you Diabetic? If so please post.

I am just trying to get a figure going of approx how many active diabetics (Melitus)are on this forum and own a boat.
Care to share if you ever had any problems out on the water? So far none for me...

Im one, who's next?

(Cant post a poll, didn't realise)
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Old 20 September 2004, 14:36   #2
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Country: UK - England
Town: Aylesbury/Lymington
Boat name: Farfetched
Make: Solent
Length: 6m +
Engine: 150hp Optimax
MMSI: 235021048
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Posts: 859
I am not, but expect to take out friends who are. Any advice that would be different from taking them on a Scottish mountain - eseentially the obvious precautions with nayone who might hypo....

Bruce
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Old 20 September 2004, 14:52   #3
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Country: UK - England
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Boat name: Falcon1
Make: Falcon
Length: 6m +
Engine: 115 hp Mariner Four
MMSI: 235021077
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Posts: 225
Chrisallse is a member of your club.

Kim (The better half)
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Old 20 September 2004, 16:25   #4
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Country: Ireland
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I'm type 2, wife type 1 but never has problems!
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Old 20 September 2004, 20:04   #5
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Country: UK - Scotland
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All i do as a precaution is of course plan what i am going to do... keep my head in gear to know when i need my next shot/meal.. and head off... if i go for an afternoon, i take my injection with me... otherwise i dont... (i only potter about for an hour before coming back in..)
However, i ALWAYS have a snack with me in the event of needing a topup (due to engine not wanting to start and janking pullstart bit to often..) or just any cause that would lower my sugar levels (and there are a few 100 of them that influence them i think..)

Just to establish my records, Min Blood value here is 1.4 once.. and still in control (have NEVER passed out..yet..) and somewhere close to 46..... All of them explainable so nothing out of the blue...


Oh Brucehawkster, Just make it clear to them that if they start to feel bad, that they notify you imediatly, and they can take action against it... im often in a situation that i feel im scared to interupt what is happening to get a snack... slowly teaching myself NOT to do so.. the longer you wait, the worse it gets (with a low) High's aren't as bad, as they just get you Very very moody... no need to worry about them.. it's the lows you should worry about, just point out that if they dont feel right, that they can tell you anytime and you will know what is happening, and perhaps slow down (stops mars bars flying overboard!) However, i think adults rarely have problems, its more the children (like meeee!) who jump about.. Oh, and make sure they bring a snack, beat them up if they dont! (anything chocolatey will do... or a Caprisun/ribena drink..)
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Old 21 September 2004, 02:37   #6
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Mr-D

Below is the copy of a report by the MAIB - from the MAIB Safety Digests from the Commercial Section of the forum. There is much within the report but of specific interest to you will be towards the end referring to a diabetic coma.

Paul


RIB – Be prepared!


In May 2001, a Morayshire club was running a number of activities including sailing and a two-day RYA powerboat course. The club had insufficient resources of its own for all the activities, and was using lent boats and equipment to meet the requirement. The powerboat course had nine trainees. Following classroom sessions on the first day, practical on-water sessions, using rigid hulled inflatable boats (RIBs), was scheduled for the second day. Having nearly completed the initial practical sessions by late morning, the decision was taken to carry out further training in more open water. The weather was good, there was no noticeable sea state and little wind. At about midday, two of the three RIBs, complete with instructor and three trainees, were offshore waiting for the remaining boat to join them. The instructors took the opportunity to demonstrate medium speed pacing techniques, and were holding their respective positions while moving at about 15 knots. Part of the demonstration was the “breakout”, where one of the RIBs peels away from its companion when at speed. The first try was aborted as the designated RIB failed to break away. On the second try, just as separation began, one of the RIBs suffered a power-drive failure. The disabled RIB slowed immediately, and found herself rolling violently in the wake of the other boat to such an extent that one of the trainees was thrown overboard. Another trainee, meanwhile, was thrown against the centre line driving rack, and was injured.

The trainee thrown overboard was then hit by the trailing propeller of the disabled RIB and injured his left hand. The other RIB turned and rescued the injured trainee from the sea and attempted to provide first-aid. It was only then that the occupants discovered that the first-aid box did not contain any dressings. The first-aid box in the disabled RIB was not much better equipped, but did have some limited dressings. The instructor on board the disabled RIB was also the course director. He transferred to this RIB, and instructed the third RIB which had, by that time, arrived on scene to take the disabled RIB back to base. Attempts were then made to make a “Pan Pan” call on channel 16 using the hand-held VHF radio, but when this failed, the decision was taken to return direct to base. On arrival, the emergency services were called using a mobile telephone, while the two injured crew members were brought ashore. At that point, another instructor collapsed and needed treatment for a diabetic coma. This was possibly brought on by heat exhaustion. Both he and the student were subsequently taken to hospital by ambulance. The cause of the power-drive failure was the fracture of the coupling between the selector lever and the gear selector cable. With the gear train spring loaded to neutral, the drive immediately shifted into neutral, and propulsion was lost.

1 As a member of a powerboat crew, ALWAYS make sure that you are firmly “anchored” to the boat using either foot or hand-holds. Vibration and violent movements of the boat are constant companions, and should be expected at all times – it is the UNEXPECTED that will catch you out.
2 For all training courses organised by a club, each boat – whether club owned or on loan – MUST carry a recognised first-aid kit at all times, and ensure that the kit is both adequate and in date.
3 Good radio communication is essential at all times. Check for “black spots” and if found, provide a radio capable of making immediate and reliable contact either with the emergency services, or the club base.
4 Some medical conditions are aggravated by sea going activities. If you think yours could be so affected, seek medical advice BEFORE starting. It is your responsibility to ensure that you are both fit and capable of meeting the requirements of the activities. It is important to realise that any organisation, whether voluntary or not, is required to comply with health and safety regulations; particularly when under-age persons are involved. Nothing should be taken for granted; if the regulations say it is required, check that it is both there, in date and functional.
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Old 21 September 2004, 02:48   #7
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Thanks for that comprehensive report and really good advice. Children don't always say things are wrong till it's nearly too late.

missus
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Old 21 September 2004, 03:55   #8
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Send a message via MSN to Jon Brooks
I am Diabetic, have been since I was 13.
Have been playing on boats since I was about 16 (sorry was a WAFI back then)

Have, touch wood, not had any trouble whilst out on the water so far.
Always take the right kit with me, plenty of Mars bars and drinks just in case.
On the Rib International round Ireland thing was on the water for best part of a day each day, no problem at all.

Regards
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Old 21 September 2004, 09:12   #9
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Paul, looking at that article seems a bit spooky... to many things went wrong in one go, and an instructor *SHOULD* have had all the safety drills before actually taking out a group so he knows how he would react... I've been a diabetic since i was... 7 or something (18 now) and have been a member of a scouting group since i was 9 i think and i left 2 years ago, in my time with scouting, i have learnt my limits and i now know how much i can cope with, and so far i have not really found the edge yet... A year ago i went camping with some friends in the middle of nowhere, i rained with low blood sugar (after cycling longer and harder than i thought) i rectified this by eating from my emergency supply, the plan was that the next day another couple of friends would come with food, they came alright.. but did not take ANY food with them except for some chocolate bars..... I lowered my dosage, and survived.. and got back after the 15 mile cycle... i know what i can cope with.. however i am getting more and more unfit at the moment.. (it needs to change!)

What tends to happen, when someone has Diabetes is that whatever is wrong with them, it gets blamed on diabetes... i've experienced this myself after having a 2 second blackout on the side of a hill (MAJORLY unfit) and the people with me thought it was diabetes, and sent me home...

Anyway, i want to see moooorreee reply's!
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