Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 06 April 2006, 06:58   #1
Member
 
Country: Other
Town: Stanley, Falkland Is
Boat name: Seawolf
Make: Osprey Vipermax 5.8
Length: 5m +
Engine: Etec 150
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 3,688
another stoopid question!

Lifejackets....

Currently using one "borrowed" from work because the cost of buying one locally was silly (best part of 300!!) and you can buy a decent one for less than 100 mail order.

So I need to order a couple...

Am I right in thinking the "harness" quoted with many jackets (as in the jacket is supplied "with harness" or "without harness") is a safety harness so you can tie yourself to the boat? so not essential?

In fact on something with an outboard, possibly not even desirable ... visions of being "reeled in" by the prop if the line got caught in it!

What do you all use, harness or no harness?

Ta
__________________

__________________
BogMonster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2006, 07:01   #2
RIBnet supporter
 
Nauti Buoy's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: West Wittering
Length: no boat
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,447
I believe the harnes is the bit that goes between your legs to stop the Life Jacket riding up should you go into the water.

I use the harness version lifejacket, with automatic inflation.

__________________
richard@kidzrides.co.uk
Mobile: 07885 487777
Nauti Buoy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2006, 07:22   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Edinburgh
Boat name: Great White
Make: Searider 5.4/Dory 13
Length: 5m +
Engine: 90hp(Rib),30hp(Dory)
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 13
No, the bit under you're legs is the crotch strap. You should ALWAYS wear this (MOB lost in sydney-hobart by slipping out the bottom of his inflated lifejacket), as the lifejacket is useless without it. It also makes it much easier to be pulled back on board.

The main difference usually is in the standard of buckle used and the addition of a "D" ring on the front that you can use to clip yourself on with. I always go for harness if possible, as it is also useful for the odd dabbling in yachts. I would never use a standard harness on a RIB for the reason you gave, but mainly that if I fall out I want to be well clear of the following blender, rather than being pinned right in it. Although I have never tried myself, A short line (max 2ft) may be good to keep the driver attached to his position, so he cannot even fall near the edges of the boat, but for what we do this is unnecessary (as safety boat we wear buoyancy aids - easier to swim and better body armour).
__________________
dogcatfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2006, 07:31   #4
Member
 
Country: Canada
Town: Newfoundland
Length: no boat
Join Date: May 2000
Posts: 2,097
Quote:
Originally Posted by dogcatfish
No, the bit under you're legs is the crotch strap. You should ALWAYS wear this (MOB lost in sydney-hobart by slipping out the bottom of his inflated lifejacket), as the lifejacket is useless without it. It also makes it much easier to be pulled back on board.

The main difference usually is in the standard of buckle used and the addition of a "D" ring on the front that you can use to clip yourself on with. I always go for harness if possible, as it is also useful for the odd dabbling in yachts. I would never use a standard harness on a RIB for the reason you gave, but mainly that if I fall out I want to be well clear of the following blender, rather than being pinned right in it. Although I have never tried myself, A short line (max 2ft) may be good to keep the driver attached to his position, so he cannot even fall near the edges of the boat, but for what we do this is unnecessary (as safety boat we wear buoyancy aids - easier to swim and better body armour).
As DogCatfish (first Codprawn, now Dogcatfish?!) says a harness is designed for yottie use where you want to 'clip on' to a lifeline if say you are working on the bow handling sails. You dont want to be clipped on to a RIB at all (apart from the killcord of course.) as falling out and being dragged along at a rate of knots is going to most likely ruin your day.
__________________
Out of the fog......
Alan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2006, 07:35   #5
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Cowes
Boat name: Tabby Cat
Make: Halmatic
Length: 7m +
Engine: 2 x Yamaha 115
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 388
As Dogcatfish has said a harness is the D ring at the front of the lifejacket. The straps that go through your legs are to prevent the lifejacket from riding over your head.

The harness D ring is woven into the webbing. I would say their is no point spending the extra money unless you are going tp playing around on yachts as well. Noted what people have said about falling overboard and having a harness attached to the boat, and getting chewed in the prop. This should not happen as the kill cord would stop the engine first.

I say to people a harness could become a real problem in a capsize situation, as you would not be thrown clear of the boat, but instead the you would be under the boat in the darkness and totally disorientated, which would make it hard to unclip the harness.

Simon
__________________
Simon Hawkins
http://www.rnli.org.uk/cowes
Simon Hawkins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2006, 07:43   #6
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Make: HumberOceanOffshore
Length: 8m +
Engine: Volvo KAD300/DPX
Join Date: Oct 2002
Posts: 4,962
Quote:
Originally Posted by dogcatfish
No, the bit under you're legs is the crotch strap. You should ALWAYS wear this ...
..we wear buoyancy aids - easier to swim and better body armour.
Absolutely. In an open boat I mostly wore both the buoyancy aid and a manual inflate life jacket.

In my cabin boat I've not standardised on either and I've even somethimes gone without (I can't quite sus the best solution.) but I always wear the buoyancy aid at the harbourside.
__________________
JW.
jwalker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2006, 07:46   #7
Member
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Edinburgh
Boat name: Great White
Make: Searider 5.4/Dory 13
Length: 5m +
Engine: 90hp(Rib),30hp(Dory)
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Hawkins
I say to people a harness could become a real problem in a capsize situation, as you would not be thrown clear of the boat, but instead the you would be under the boat in the darkness and totally disorientated, which would make it hard to unclip the harness.
Simon
This shows the importance of getting a proper harness line made up, for whatever you use it. All of the approved ones should have quick release on both ends, so that even if you cannot see, or the other end is inaccessable, you only need to find your chest and from there it's easy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Simon Hawkins
Noted what people have said about falling overboard and having a harness attached to the boat, and getting chewed in the prop. This should not happen as the kill cord would stop the engine first.
This assumes the driver fell out. If a passenger fell out of your boat, think how long it would take to spot it, think about it, and then kill the engine. I would say either: make sure your lifeline prevents you from getting near the egde; OR you can fall completely clear and detached.
__________________
dogcatfish is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2006, 08:00   #8
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Cowes
Boat name: Tabby Cat
Make: Halmatic
Length: 7m +
Engine: 2 x Yamaha 115
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 388
Noted what you say, and yes they are quick to release when you are not disorientated and panicking in the dark in a capsized rib. Why do you think the RNLI, Marine Police etc not use them.

I would advise against any form or harness in a open powered boat.

Simon
__________________
Simon Hawkins
http://www.rnli.org.uk/cowes
Simon Hawkins is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06 April 2006, 15:25   #9
Member
 
Country: Other
Town: Stanley, Falkland Is
Boat name: Seawolf
Make: Osprey Vipermax 5.8
Length: 5m +
Engine: Etec 150
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 3,688
Thank you, excellent answers as always

I am trying to find one place that can supply everything I need so as I can do an order for everything, so what I get will depend on what is available. At the moment Mailspeed Marine seem to do everything except for hypalon cleaner for the tubes so I guess it may be one of theirs.
__________________
BogMonster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 19 April 2006, 02:02   #10
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Southampton
Boat name: DynaMoHumm/ SRV/deja
Make: Avon8.4, 5.4 & 4.777
Length: 8m +
Engine: Cat3126 Yam 90 &70
MMSI: 42
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 6,556
if you want

Stephen send me a list of what you need and I'll find out the trade prices and order it all from our suppliers, you can then arrange for a Courier to collect it or I'll ship it out to you.

Your lifejackets seem very costly to me
__________________

__________________
Here it comes again, I don't stand a chance
Soul possession, Got me in a trance
Pullin' me back to you - Deja Voodoo
Rogue Wave is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:25.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.