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Old 21 November 2005, 18:27   #1
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anchoring techniques

I have man handled more than my fair share of anchors over the years but never on a RIB until I did my powerboat level 2. It is pretty easy when you have a proper bow roller to haul over but when you don't want to mark the tubes of an inflatable it's not so easy.

For good holding you have got to have a fair bit of chain as well as rope. What I was wondering is if it would be ok to anchor without using the chain unless it's really needed. The chain could sit in a locker and be shackled onto the rope if the conditions get bad.

I think most people tend to anchor on nice calm days and hefty ground tackle isn't needed 90% of the time.
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Old 21 November 2005, 18:34   #2
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wotever floats yer boat...

We use a chain always. Keeps things where they should be!

Helpful to be prepared in emergencies I guess.

Probably recommended rather than compulsory but interested in everyone else's opinion.

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Old 21 November 2005, 18:35   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by codprawn
... to anchor on nice calm days and hefty ground tackle isn't needed 90% of the time.
Agreed but it's all chain for me if I'm leaving it. It's very reassuring when you hear the wind getting up during the night.
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Old 21 November 2005, 18:51   #4
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Depends on lots of variables!

Dave Mallett is your man for describing anchoring techniques. He's done some good posts here and/or a good article in RIB International.

I like having a short (~5m) bit of chain on the anchor at all times. I've been caught out on a calm day without the chain attached, you really do want to be prepared, as holding your position and attaching chain to shackles whilst bobbing around is not ideal. I do use a very small anchor for the boat size (for short stops aboard), so I really need the chain to keep it in place.

A couple of tips - keep an old towel handy for laying chain on the deck so it doesn't mark. This can be useful for padding where the warp goes over the tube if you need it. Also, you might like to consider tying off your bow painter to the anchor warp so that your D-ring takes the load, and the warp coming over the bow has no tension on it until you recover the anchor.

Wayne Rodgers has a handy strip of stainless steel in his rubber bow fairlead which helps lifting the anchor warp and chain without damaging the tubes.

We had a spectacular and amusing demo of a RIB anchored with rope only, back in September. In the wind-over tide, it was dragged one way, then blown the other, and did a complete circle of us. Or did we do a complete circle of the other RIB?
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Old 21 November 2005, 20:48   #5
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I thought chain was a manditory requirement for anchors to set properly. The chain is supposed to bring any tugging force from the boat horizontally across the seabed therefore allowing the anchor to snag. If the force had alot of vertical component the anchor would more likely lift out. I have ten feet of chain permanently attached to my anchor and then 125' of line. I haven't had any problems dragging anchor yet.

I don't know why you'd want an option of constantly attaching and dettaching chain to your anchor line. I think in this case simpler is better. And the peace of mind everytime outweighs any possible inconvenience.

I also always back up the boat and tug line to make sure its set. And probably lay 4-1 line vs depth. Something like that.
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Old 21 November 2005, 21:56   #6
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On any boat other than a RIB I would never do without the chain. I plan on carrying 2 anchors - a danforth 18lb and a fisherman anchor of similar size.

What I was thinking of was relying on one of these hefty anchors for calm weather and chucking on 30' of heavy chain when the conditions arise.

I just don't fancy dragging 30' of chain over my bow!!! I also have a lot of hefty rope to go with it - 400 feet to be exact.

Anyone tried the alderney ring method or similar?
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Old 22 November 2005, 02:40   #7
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Are you planning on doing some extreme anchoring or are you really taking the rise?

Danforths are great anchors, but they have two really nasty characteristics - Firstly, in ground where they hold well (mud or sand) they are real pigs to retrieve! And tripping lines won't help. Secondly, as they are two part anchors, it's very easy to get your fingers caught between the two parts. Ouch. Done that, used the swear words! So, would you like to buy my 12lb stainless steel danforth?

Fishermans anchor - never seen one used on a RIB! Don't know why you would ever use one. A folding grapnel would be more versatile and easier to stow.

Having 2x 18lb anchors and 30' heavy chain is a real lot of weight. And you will know about it when you're recovering that. All that gear will take up a lot of space and be difficult to get in and out of hatches. Make life easier for yourself, and use the lightest tackle you can get away with, unless you're planning on doing deep sea anchoring, or leaving the boat unattended, or anchoring in foul weather.

I have a 7.5kg (16.5lb) Bruce which I've never used. It now lives in the garage. Good, simple anchors. However, If anyone wants to swop it for a 5.5kg bruce, I would be very pleased to speak to them! I've never used it because it's so difficult to get out of the locker, depoy and recover. I would only use it for anchoring overnight, which I don't plan to do.

I use the folding grapnel on its short length of chain as it's much easier to use. Holds OK on most sea beds when helped by the chain. Easy to recover. Easy to stow.

Good luck practising the "Alderney Ring Method". Could be useful if you want to anchor in deep water often. But if you're out with a group, expect them to have recovered their boats onto their trailers and off to the pub by the time you've retrieved your anchor... KISS!
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Old 22 November 2005, 03:33   #8
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get a roller fittted to the transom then move the rope down the side of the rib to that and haul it in no problem somthing like this
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Old 22 November 2005, 03:34   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard B
I use the folding grapnel on its short length of chain as it's much easier to use. Holds OK on most sea beds when helped by the chain. Easy to recover. Easy to stow.
I'm with Richard on this one.

I'd sooner use a 5Kg grapnel with 10m of chain than a bigger anchor and no chain. The chain doesn't need to be massively heavy as its main purpose is to ensure that the pull on the anchor is horizontal not vertical.

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Old 22 November 2005, 04:39   #10
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You can anchor with only rope. You would need to let out a lot more scope though. (i.e. 5 x depth).
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