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Old 28 November 2005, 03:43   #41
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Originally Posted by wavelength
if he knew the best thing about those modern compact anchors. When he answered "No" Harry's reply was that they didnt take up much room in the dustbin when you threw them away
you must have one hell of a bin and be very very old!!!!
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Old 28 November 2005, 04:40   #42
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Originally Posted by codprawn
For day to day stuff probably a folding grapnel will be the best - obviously only on calm days and never if I am leaving the boat!!!
agreed having managed to get one stuck in the mud of Belfast lough I can testify they do have a good holding power in a variety of conditions for there size.

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A lot of people probably don't realise that the weight of an anchor doesn't make any difference -
hmm not sure about that one. There are recommended sizes for a paticular boat length.

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The Fortress is probably the ultimate for a RIB but there is no way I would spend that sort of money on something you may have to leave on the seabed!!!
good point, loosing a 15 grapnel or 30 Bruce isn't going to result in tears but 200 of shiney polished stainless steel Delta, well.....
On more than one occasion we have had to cut the rope and leave the anchor when towing or rings have failed to budge an anchor even at full power and in different directions.

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I will also be carrying a Sea Anchor - ended up buying the biggest size they had designed for 45' yachts - it was only a little more expensive and still rolls up small.
Yes I have one too, its on the list of things to test next year.
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Old 28 November 2005, 10:57   #43
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be very very old
yep-I did Noahs pbL2 for him - and he still ran it aground on Mt Arrarat
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Old 28 November 2005, 12:23   #44
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The reason certain weights of anchor are advised for certain boat lengths is because the majority of anchors are steel and it is a lot harder to measure them by surface area!!!

Weight is only important in setting the anchor - it helps it penetrate the seabed - once buried it is down to the surface area only - think of a 100lb lead ball and a 100lb sheet of plywood as 2 extremes.
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Old 28 November 2005, 12:29   #45
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Originally Posted by codprawn
think of a 100lb lead ball and a 100lb sheet of plywood as 2 extremes.
Err, strangely enough, I don't think either of these would "penetrate the seabed" very well

Stop now, you're starting to dig one of your infamous holes!
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Old 28 November 2005, 12:30   #46
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Codprawn, I think I understand what you're trying to say, but it seems that your argument is a bit confused.

By your reasoning an anchor made out of tinfoil would be ideal! I'd also rather go for the lead ball than the plywood anchor.

The weight of an anchor may not be the only consideration, but it's still important.

John
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Old 28 November 2005, 12:52   #47
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Originally Posted by John Kennett
Codprawn, I think I understand what you're trying to say, but it seems that your argument is a bit confused.

By your reasoning an anchor made out of tinfoil would be ideal! I'd also rather go for the lead ball than the plywood anchor.

The weight of an anchor may not be the only consideration, but it's still important.

John
I was pointing out 2 extremes to try to illustrate the point. Obviously the lead ball would have far better penetration but IF the 2 were buried the ply sheet would be FAR better because of the massive surface area.

The tests on Fortress anchors are rather misleading because they compare 2 anchors based on weight. Obviously the Fortress being aluminium alloy is going to have a much bigger surface area than the equivelent steel one for the same mass.

When I am driving in sand I carry a 1 ton builders bag with me - only weighs a fraction - entirely down to it's surface area - if I need to winch I can always bury it. The old trick was a spare wheel but you have to dig that back out again!!!
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Old 28 November 2005, 12:54   #48
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Originally Posted by Richard B
Err, strangely enough, I don't think either of these would "penetrate the seabed" very well

Stop now, you're starting to dig one of your infamous holes!
Yes I will just have to give up on the plywood - don't think letting an anchor "dig in" really means going over the side with a spade!!!
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Old 28 November 2005, 13:17   #49
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some folks on here have been known to dive in after the anchor, perhaps they had to check it was set properly or to help it dig in!!!!!
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Old 28 November 2005, 15:43   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh Jardon
some folks on here have been known to dive in after the anchor, perhaps they had to check it was set properly or to help it dig in!!!!!
Could be me! If i'm spearfishing I always dive down and check. It's very reassuring to see the anchor nicely dug in,especially if I'm staying the night. Tripping the anchor when staying the night is a bit of a worry as the anchor just falls to the bottom. Have been known to sleep with the tripline tied around my wrist.
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