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Old 07 February 2010, 12:12   #1
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Anchoring outside a drying harbour

I am sure there was a thread on here describing this technique, but now I cant find it. Can anyone help, please?

Essentially I want to be able to anchor my boat "offshore" and without getting wet, proceed to the shore/dockside. And then, more importantly, to be able to recover it the next morning without getting wet once again.

There is such a technique using a running line thru a pulley/carabiner, isnt there?

This is not an idle request. I intend to cruise thru the Inner and Outer Hebrides this year and need to know this technique.
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Old 07 February 2010, 13:54   #2
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Hi Brian as one who uses the system on the west of scotland I can advise that it is as simple or complicated as you want to make it. Basically it is an appropriate anchor with raiser to bouy with a loop mechanism either ring/carrabine or rope just below the water line. You then run your slip rope to the shore looping it thru the ring thus also allowing you to attach your boat. You then can pull your boat out to the bouy and then attach the shore end to a permanent fixing on shore. Hope this helps.

J
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Old 07 February 2010, 14:11   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian View Post
Essentially I want to be able to anchor my boat "offshore" and without getting wet, proceed to the shore/dockside. And then, more importantly, to be able to recover it the next morning without getting wet once again.
iyve sean dis tekniqe az wel

ifn i reemember correkly i fink itts corld........


...........gow an bi a dingy



wiLf
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Old 07 February 2010, 14:43   #4
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Jambo-thank you !

wiLf - I have a dingy, but I am trying not to take/use it in that environment. But thank you for your kind words.
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Old 07 February 2010, 16:05   #5
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knot

Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo View Post
Hi Brian as one who uses the system on the west of scotland I can advise that it is as simple or complicated as you want to make it. Basically it is an appropriate anchor with raiser to bouy with a loop mechanism either ring/carrabine or rope just below the water line. You then run your slip rope to the shore looping it thru the ring thus also allowing you to attach your boat. You then can pull your boat out to the bouy and then attach the shore end to a permanent fixing on shore. Hope this helps.

J
I would also be tying a great big knot in the line just in case somebody sees the rope but cant see whats on the end of it at least if the rope is undone the boat wont just drift away.
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Old 07 February 2010, 18:21   #6
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I am also interested in having my boat off shore, so have I got this right,anchor over the stern attached to bouy with ring, tie one end of rope to stern, back through ring on the bouy then back to shore, then back to bow?
pull on one rope to move the boat to shore ,pull stern line to pull boat to bouy.
I was caught out before with a falling tide ,and also with a rising tide , so this would be helpful
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Old 08 February 2010, 06:09   #7
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The line from the bouy to the shore is independent, it goes thru the ring/carrabine and forms a loop to the shore fixing point. All you do is attach your bow painter to the loop and pull out to bouy and vice-versa for coming to shore. For ease I always put a loop in the main line for ease and it forms a stop at the bouy.
Hope this helps.
J
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Old 08 February 2010, 07:20   #8
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I think this is what Jambo is describing?

It does mean there is a rope fairly close to the surface of the water though which may be a hazard in some places. I've seen a similar approach described where the lines run back to the anchor rather than the bouy - so keeping them submersed.
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Old 08 February 2010, 07:56   #9
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I think this is what Jambo is describing?

It does mean there is a rope fairly close to the surface of the water though which may be a hazard in some places. I've seen a similar approach described where the lines run back to the anchor rather than the bouy - so keeping them submersed.
if floating lines going to be a problem ,,, lead line,, rope used by some crab fishermen and long liners and gill netters would be ok for keeping it submerged ,, its basicly normal polyprop rope with a string of lead pellets woven inside so it sinks to the bottom ,makes good anchor rope too,
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Old 08 February 2010, 08:45   #10
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if floating lines going to be a problem ,,, lead line,, rope used by some crab fishermen and long liners and gill netters would be ok for keeping it submerged ,, its basicly normal polyprop rope with a string of lead pellets woven inside so it sinks to the bottom ,makes good anchor rope too,
But surely the rope needs to be fairly taught to keep the boat at the mooring and not drifting back to shore in an onshore blow? Its not so much a floating rope problem as a 'taught' rope problem.
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