Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 01 June 2006, 05:57   #1
Member
 
Andy Moore's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Cowes, Isle of Wight
Boat name: TiLT 2
Make: Avon Adventure 620
Length: 6m +
Engine: Optimax 135
MMSI: 235032203
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,639
Anchor Warp

What do you tie your anchor warp on to? We really only have the moulded cleats-cum-handles on the tubes (not ideal) and the U-bolt on the bow (a good solution but too low down).

I was thinking of putting a ring a couple of feet up the painter from the U-bolt. The anchor warp couple then be made off on to this and the load taken by the U-bolt.

Any ideas appreciated.
__________________

__________________
Andy Moore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 June 2006, 06:04   #2
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: I.O.W/Bristol
Boat name: HotShot
Make: shakey
Length: 5m +
Engine: 70hp Tohatsu
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,543
sounds like a plan. Then have the rest of the painter as a "lazy line" which enables you to pull the anchor up without leaning right over the bow.
__________________

__________________
slimtim is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 June 2006, 06:06   #3
Member
 
Andy Moore's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Cowes, Isle of Wight
Boat name: TiLT 2
Make: Avon Adventure 620
Length: 6m +
Engine: Optimax 135
MMSI: 235032203
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,639
Quote:
Originally Posted by slimtim
sounds like a plan. Then have the rest of the painter as a "lazy line" which enables you to pull the anchor up without leaning right over the bow.
Yes. Just need a knot that will stop the ring sliding!
__________________
Andy Moore is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 June 2006, 06:06   #4
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Saltash, Cornwall
Make: Rib less:-(
Length: no boat
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 693
Andy
That is exactly what I have don on my Redbay, as I can't reach the front D ring from being in the boat.
I do have a internal D ring but the line would then run over the tube .
Only problem with the ring in the painter is getting the length right so you can reach it but it also still fits in the guide over the tube. They also have a habit of clinking if not kept tight.

I also worked in some shock cord into the lay of the painter as you would a splice. This shortens the line but does give some shock load reduction, wether its as effective as hanging an angel on the anchor line etc I'm not sure, but it kept me out of trouble for an evening!
Rgds
James

As for knots the rolling hitch is the correct name or a set of chinese fingers. (4 or more lengths of small cord all tied together with a loop in the middle. you then take each pair and working from one side to the other ot the anchor line keep crossing it and tie off furtther down the line. this adds lots of friction and you can take the load off the anchor line . also good for removing riding turns on winches etc.
__________________
Jelly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01 June 2006, 12:13   #5
Member
 
Simon B's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Leicester
Boat name: Vixen
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 6m +
Engine: Suzuki OB 175
MMSI: 235071839
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,621
On our club boat we have a black 14mm line spliced onto the bow D ring, this then has a 10mm white line spliced on about 1.5 metres from the bow D ring. The white line is kept to hand in the boat and can be used to recover the larger rope when tied up say to a bouy.

Both are of a length such that if it all went overboard it wouldnt foul the prop. And the junction between the white and black looks rather smart as a splice!

Jelly, your shockcord idea sounds a cracker - I will try this out as an experiment, we nearly had our frame damaged due to riding a chop whilst tied up.
__________________
New boat is here, very happy!
Simon
www.luec.org
Simon B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02 June 2006, 05:24   #6
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Saltash, Cornwall
Make: Rib less:-(
Length: no boat
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 693
Simon
It was in PBO a while ago, I think I used 6mm diameter shock cord in to either 12 or 14 mm 3 strand nylon. Then just worked 3 lengths in over and under as you would a splice.
I'm moored where you get surge from the trip & ferry boats, I hope it helps!
Jelly
__________________
Jelly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02 June 2006, 06:53   #7
Member
 
Simon B's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Leicester
Boat name: Vixen
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 6m +
Engine: Suzuki OB 175
MMSI: 235071839
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,621
Will definately be giving this a go, wonder if it has a limit interms of tensile strength as we sometimes tow by the painter?
__________________
New boat is here, very happy!
Simon
www.luec.org
Simon B is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02 June 2006, 07:49   #8
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: Milford Haven
Boat name: Various
Make: Commercial
Length: 10m +
Engine: Screw / Voith / Jets
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 791
Send a message via MSN to Alex Brown
I normally bung a bowline in the end of the painter (which is thicker rope than the anchor line), and then tie a bowline from the anchor rope into the painter bowline at the required length. You can then let the painter take the main strain to the bow eye, and it leaves you with the loose end of the anchor line that you can easily make fast to the rubber cleat cos it's not putting any strain on whatsoever - you then use this line to haul the anchor back up afterwards..... very simple and quick to do

-Alex
__________________
Flickr Photos
Youtube Videos
Alex Brown is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02 June 2006, 07:53   #9
Member
 
ashbypower's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Salisbury/Poole
Boat name: Blue C
Make: XS 600
Length: 6m +
Engine: 125hp Opti
MMSI: 235082826/235909566
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Brown
I normally bung a bowline in the end of the painter (which is thicker rope than the anchor line), and then tie a bowline from the anchor rope into the painter bowline at the required length. You can then let the painter take the main strain to the bow eye, and it leaves you with the loose end of the anchor line that you can easily make fast to the rubber cleat cos it's not putting any strain on whatsoever - you then use this line to haul the anchor back up afterwards..... very simple and quick to do

-Alex
Yep that how we do it and advise students in that method. Also prvents rub on the tubes.
__________________
Brian C
Harbour Sea School & APS Marine Centre
ashbypower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02 June 2006, 07:56   #10
Member
 
Andy Moore's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Cowes, Isle of Wight
Boat name: TiLT 2
Make: Avon Adventure 620
Length: 6m +
Engine: Optimax 135
MMSI: 235032203
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 1,639
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Brown
I normally bung a bowline in the end of the painter (which is thicker rope than the anchor line), and then tie a bowline from the anchor rope into the painter bowline at the required length. You can then let the painter take the main strain to the bow eye, and it leaves you with the loose end of the anchor line that you can easily make fast to the rubber cleat cos it's not putting any strain on whatsoever - you then use this line to haul the anchor back up afterwards..... very simple and quick to do
Sounds like a good method.
__________________

__________________
Andy Moore is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 20:54.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.