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Old 04 October 2006, 15:08   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Brown
I wonder though, if you are drifting without the engine turned on and not specifically underway, should you be displaying lights in the form of Red, White and Red in a vertical line since you are restricted?
I know we use this for towage, but how far down the line does it go I wonder, is it commercial vessels only? - remember it's all about being seen and letting others know what you're doing, or not as the case may be.

-Alex
According to the definitions in the colregs you are still underway if you are "drifting". So you should still be showing your "steaming" lights.

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(f) The term “vessel not under command” means a vessel which through some exceptional circumstance is unable to manoeuvre as required by these Rules and is therefore unable to keep out of the way of another vessel.
(g) The term “vessel restricted in her ability to manoeuvre” means a vessel which from the nature of her work is restricted in her ability to manoeuvre as required by these Rules and is therefore unable to keep out of the way of another vessel. The term “vessels restricted in their ability to manoeuvre” shall include but not be limited to:
  • (i) a vessel engaged in laying, servicing or picking up a navigation mark, submarine cable or pipeline;
  • (ii) a vessel engaged in dredging, surveying or underwater operations;
  • (iii) a vessel engaged in replenishment or transferring persons, provisions or cargo while underway;
  • (iv) a vessel engaged in the launching or recovery of aircraft;
  • (v) a vessel engaged in mine clearance operations;
  • (vi) a vessel engaged in a towing operation such as severely restricts the towing vessel and her tow in their ability to deviate from their course.
(h) The term “vessel constrained by her draught” means a power-driven vessel which, because of her draught in relation to the available depth and width of navigable water, is severely restricted in her ability to deviate from the course she is following.
(i) The word “underway” means that a vessel is not at anchor, or made fast to the shore, or aground.
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Old 05 October 2006, 05:35   #12
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Agree with the last post on Collision Regs.

You are underway as soon as the anchor is lifted off the bottom (not just lifted back onboard) and as soon as the line is slipped from a mooring.

"My view is that whilst drifting, not anchored and not attached to a mooring, you are under way but not making way" is correct.

LIGHTS:

According to the International Collision Regulations the lights you need depend upon size and also speed and can be summarised as follows for powered boats:

Vessels 12 to 20m LOA:
1) a white stern light
2) red and green side lights mounted separately or combined in a single bi-lantern
3) a white masthead light shown at least 2.5m above the level of the side lights

Vessels under 12m LOA:
Must carry side and stern lights as specified above and a masthead light mounted at least 1m above the level of the side lights.

Vessels under 7m LOA:
**Maximum speed not exceeding 7 knots**
Required to carry a single all round white light but should also carry side lights if practicable to do so.


Trust this clarifies the nav lights need on a RIB travelling over 7 knots.
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Old 05 October 2006, 08:05   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spence
Vessels under 12m LOA:
Must carry side and stern lights as specified above and a masthead light mounted at least 1m above the level of the side lights.

Vessels under 7m LOA:
**Maximum speed not exceeding 7 knots**
Required to carry a single all round white light but should also carry side lights if practicable to do so.


Trust this clarifies the nav lights need on a RIB travelling over 7 knots.
It does thanks and I will need to check that I have the 1m separation on my over 7knots 6.3m... but where is the mention that you can combine the stern and all-round white- or is that a myth?
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Old 05 October 2006, 13:57   #14
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The masthead light only shows light forwards (forget the arc).
A stern light only shows light astern. The arcs of the mast head lights and the stern lights add up to 360 degrees. Both these lights may be replaced by an all round white if vessel is under 7 metres and travelling under 7 knots.

But I had never realised there was the 7 knot limit for under 7 metres.
So now i'm wondering if I should have a masthead and stern light on a vessel under 7 metres but going over 7 knots.

Am sure Simon can clarify, as well as others.

I have a feeling the all rounder is still OK, as I sail on tall ships, whose RIBS have the same setup, and I cannot believe they are not compliant!. However, the quotes below do seem unclear!
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Old 05 October 2006, 14:52   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Neil Harvey
The masthead light only shows light forwards (forget the arc).
A stern light only shows light astern. The arcs of the mast head lights and the stern lights add up to 360 degrees. Both these lights may be replaced by an all round white if vessel is under 7 metres and travelling under 7 knots.

But I had never realised there was the 7 knot limit for under 7 metres.
So now i'm wondering if I should have a masthead and stern light on a vessel under 7 metres but going over 7 knots.

Am sure Simon can clarify, as well as others.

I have a feeling the all rounder is still OK, as I sail on tall ships, whose RIBS have the same setup, and I cannot believe they are not compliant!. However, the quotes below do seem unclear!
You probably wish you hadn't started this now but see here http://www.sailtrain.co.uk/Irpcs/rule23.htm - relevant section is Rule 23 d(i)

So a rib < 12 m in length (and capable of >7knots) should be displaying as a minimum: side lights plus an all round white light. Other combinations are OK too.
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Old 08 October 2006, 03:49   #16
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Lights

Thanks for the replies.

So it looks like only Ribcraft fits a suitable two-way rocker switch to permit an anchor light to be displayed, when separate port & starboard lights are fitted.

What's up with the RIB builders then? Why do they not facilitate something that is an international requirement?

Do please tell if your RIB builder had/has the foresight to fit the "required" lighting configuration.

Thanks.

Chris.
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Old 08 October 2006, 04:28   #17
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My XS has a two position switch allowing either the anchor light (single all round white) or running lights (all round white plus red and green port and starboard lights).
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Old 08 October 2006, 04:30   #18
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Mine doesn't-Avon on original wiring through the A-frame. It'll be a PITA to change so I carry the separate anchor light if I'm intending to anchor at night.
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Old 08 October 2006, 06:38   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris Murray
Do please tell if your RIB builder had/has the foresight to fit the "required" lighting configuration.
Our Humber has separate switches (and fuses) for the anchor and running lights.

I originally thought this was overkill to use 2 out of 6 available on the switch panel, but they obviously know their stuff!

Paul.
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Old 08 October 2006, 09:07   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spence
Vessels under 7m LOA:
**Maximum speed not exceeding 7 knots**
Required to carry a single all round white light but should also carry side lights if practicable to do so.
It's the "if practicable" bit that is important here.

One of the rescue teams that I've worked with operates 5 SIBS and 2 RIBS under 7m. One RIB is over 7m and has a console with A-frame and all the necessary lights. The other seven boats are all tiller control (we tend work mostly inside or on the surfline). There is next to nothing to attach a light to in the boat (apart from perhaps on top of the engine cowling). So when we are out on night-ops (very rare) we have diving strobe lights attached to our PFD shoulders that are switched onto permanent beam.

It's not ideal, but we feel having two or three little white lights close together guarantees that we are visible from 360degrees, whereas one light on the helms shoulder, his head blocks about 160degrees.

We did experiment with placing one of these lights on the bow of the boat, but found that it just dazzled the helm all the time.

Regards, WMM

P.S. This was/is on the Atlantic coast of France... I dunno how strict they are at clamping down on things like this, but we never had any complaints.

EDIT: Just re-read the IRPCS... and it does look like we aren't complying. Interesting. So.. how do the RNLI Lifeguard Arancias, or the D-class compy? I'm gonna go Google some photos.

I mean? Maybe the Arancias don't operate at night, but I'd imagine the D-class might... particularly in the winters ooop nooorth!
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