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Old 23 November 2004, 10:44   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon Brooks
...but am sure DM is the salt of the earth

Regards
..

Don't you believe that.... here.. take a look at this PM from Mr M... names have been changed to protect the guilty...


"I suppose
.. that I ought to tell you that Nobba sent me a pm saying he was worried that he had upset you. I told him you were very angry. He asked me what you drank and for your address. In a moment of weakness, I told him Jamesons and gave him my address.

Cheers

Dave"


So there you have it.. a true professional...
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Old 23 November 2004, 13:56   #32
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Manning's a kinda 'Father Jack Hackett' character really, inne!.....Drink, Girls, Drink, Arse, Feck!
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Old 23 November 2004, 15:51   #33
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Originally Posted by MeMe
Anyone willing to volenteer to assist, help or even save me my family or even the god damn dog deserves a little more respect in my opinion. Paid or otherwise.
Well said MeMe.

Ideally it would be good to have pro advice in cases such as potential spinal injury. I thought the same as Mark W. i.e. keeping the person in the water wasn't such a bad idea. Once they don't die from hypothermia of course

Having assisted in hauling a few 'flipees' aboard a RIB last year I know it wasn't a smooth operation for us 'volunteers' and it must have been really rough for the poor peeps in the water whose joints we almost dislocated and whom we nearly re-drowned as we put them on the by then awash deck

Must be hard for anyone to follow textbook directions with all the potential variables...

Respect to the various services, voluntary and paid.

missus
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Old 23 November 2004, 18:16   #34
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Bl00dy landlubbers - only RUM is a 'proper' seafarers' tipple!

SDG
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Old 24 November 2004, 08:52   #35
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Incident

If the cas was collared & boarded, whatever your opinion of those technologies, lying awash in the tide was probably not the best place for them. Risk of inhalation of water, and obviously hypothermia, the obvious. I would have thought the risk of extraction (given the stabilised condition & no. assets available) was less than risk of further injury/deterioration. IMVHO.

And yes, while <10% of the RNLI intake now has a professional maritime background, this is not always bad, esp on ILBs. Three or four of our crew had literally thousands of hours each on small powerboats, but were accoutants, engineers and the like. One is a full-time fisherman. Who is the better Atlantic 75 boathandler?

Finally - Missus got it right - out there, there is no textbook answer.You play the best hand with the cards you're dealt.
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Old 24 November 2004, 08:56   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ribrunt
If the cas was collared & boarded, whatever your opinion of those technologies, lying awash in the tide was probably not the best place for them. Risk of inhalation of water, and obviously hypothermia, the obvious. I would have thought the risk of extraction (given the stabilised condition & no. assets available) was less than risk of further injury/deterioration. IMVHO.

And yes, while <10% of the RNLI intake now has a professional maritime background, this is not always bad, esp on ILBs. Three or four of our crew had literally thousands of hours each on small powerboats, but were accoutants, engineers and the like. One is a full-time fisherman. Who is the better Atlantic 75 boathandler?

Finally - Missus got it right - out there, there is no textbook answer.You play the best hand with the cards you're dealt.
Top reply Runt, as always have a greenie on me

Regards
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Old 24 November 2004, 10:16   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ribrunt
Finally - Missus got it right - out there, there is no textbook answer.You play the best hand with the cards you're dealt.
Err.... no, she didn't actually . If I remember correctly, she didn't think it was a bad idea to leave him in the water. And it doesn't matter what the variables are, the priorities for resuscitation/life support are always exactly the same, in the water or out.


Quote:
Originally Posted by ribrunt
And yes, while <10% of the RNLI intake now has a professional maritime background, this is not always bad, esp on ILBs.

Yeh, yeh, there's always going to be exceptions to the rule, and just because someone is a professional boat handler, it doesn't necessarily mean they're good at it. But usually they are good at it because they do it everyday. Until the decline of the UK maritime/fishing industry, lifeboat crews were traditionally drawn from local seafaring communities. What do you think were the reasons for that?

DM
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Old 24 November 2004, 10:27   #38
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Because they already

Quote:
Originally Posted by davidmanning
Until the decline of the UK maritime/fishing industry, lifeboat crews were traditionally drawn from local seafaring communities. What do you think were the reasons for that?DM
..........owned their own wellies
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Old 24 November 2004, 10:31   #39
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Will those of you who...........

Quote:
Originally Posted by ribrunt
If the cas was collared & boarded, whatever your opinion of those technologies, lying awash in the tide was probably not the best place for them. Risk of inhalation of water, and obviously hypothermia, the obvious. I would have thought the risk of extraction (given the stabilised condition & no. assets available) was less than risk of further injury/deterioration. IMVHO.

And yes, while <10% of the RNLI intake now has a professional maritime background, this is not always bad, esp on ILBs. Three or four of our crew had literally thousands of hours each on small powerboats, but were accoutants, engineers and the like. One is a full-time fisherman. Who is the better Atlantic 75 boathandler?

Finally - Missus got it right - out there, there is no textbook answer.You play the best hand with the cards you're dealt.
.......keep quoting the whole god damn text of the previous post please stop ! I appreciate some of you old gits have failing memories but surely to god they're not so bad that you have to quote something all over again in the very next post. THANK YOU (not pointing any fingers at you JON BROOKS)!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!
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Old 24 November 2004, 10:32   #40
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See. it's a pain........

Quote:
Originally Posted by MeMe
.......keep quoting the whole god damn text of the previous post please stop ! I appreciate some of you old gits have failing memories but surely ot god they're not so bad that you have to quote something all over again ion the ver next post. THANK YOU
....in the arse isn't it ?
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