Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 25 March 2011, 19:50   #1
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
Am I insured in an RCD Cat C boat when "at sea"

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vandad View Post
...t it will be a Humber Assault. It is Cat C so you are kind of limited "insurance wise!!".
are we just making stuff up as we go along?
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 25 March 2011, 20:57   #2
Member
 
Vandad's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: London
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 8m +
Engine: 250hp
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart View Post
are we just making stuff up as we go along?
ha?!

Humber Assault is Class C (Inshore). So technically you are not supposed to go too far offshore. If you go and be involved in an accident, then your insurance will simply won't even cover you for a penny!

But everybody used Assault for cruising between IoW and Southampton!

But if I am going to suggest something to a member here, I must tell him the truth!
__________________

__________________
Vandad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26 March 2011, 05:11   #3
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vandad View Post
ha?!

Humber Assault is Class C (Inshore). So technically you are not supposed to go too far offshore. If you go and be involved in an accident, then your insurance will simply won't even cover you for a penny!

But everybody used Assault for cruising between IoW and Southampton!

But if I am going to suggest something to a member here, I must tell him the truth!
RCD Classes aren't referred to in any insurance policy I've read. Do you have evidence that any insurance claim has not been paid because a boat was being used outside its RCD Design Class?

The RCD Classes make no direct reference to "distance from shore" but rather to sea conditions and wind speeds. "Designed for waves of up to 2m significant height and a typical steady wind force of Beaufort force 6 or less. Such conditions may be encountered on exposed inland waters, and in coastal waters in moderate weather conditions." 2m significant wave ht doesn't even mean a maximum wave size of 2m (roughly 90% will be <2m - but you could reasonably expect an ocassional 4m wave). You can quite feasibly get these conditions 2 miles from the shore or mid channel. In good weather you could expect to cross the Chanel, or the Irish Sea in a Cat C boat. Indeed most insurance policies will provide cover for something like "Coastal Waters of UK & Ireland" as the default 'setting'.

In reality Cat C is much easier (cheaper) to certify so there will be many Cat C boats which could pass Cat B. Search the forum for a few manufacturers opinions of RCD categories.

I'm not suggesting the assault is the ideal boat for taking in serious seas (far from it - it has a fairly ropey reputation for sea keeping (but needs less power to get on the plane so its not all bad!)). However I am suggesting you are not only reading way too much into the RCD Categories but also misleading people that they will not be insured.

[/FONT]
[/FONT]
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26 March 2011, 06:09   #4
Member
 
chewy's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Up Norf
Make: Avon SR4,Tremlett 23
Length: 4m +
Engine: Yam 55, Volvo 200
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 5,217
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vandad View Post
ha?!

Humber Assault is Class C (Inshore). So technically you are not supposed to go too far offshore. If you go and be involved in an accident, then your insurance will simply won't even cover you for a penny!

But everybody used Assault for cruising between IoW and Southampton!

But if I am going to suggest something to a member here, I must tell him the truth!

You can go as far as your insurance covers you.

As for boats if your after something the assault is ok but will never be a great seakeeping boat. You'll get a slightly older destroyer for your budget, you may have to deflate the tubes a bit to get it in your garage though?
__________________
chewy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26 March 2011, 18:04   #5
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Dorset & Hants
Boat name: Streaker/Orange
Make: Avon/Ribcraft
Length: 4m +
Engine: 50Yam/25 Mariner
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 5,551
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vandad View Post
ha?!

Humber Assault is Class C (Inshore). So technically you are not supposed to go too far offshore. If you go and be involved in an accident, then your insurance will simply won't even cover you for a penny!

But everybody used Assault for cruising between IoW and Southampton!

But if I am going to suggest something to a member here, I must tell him the truth!
Hmmmmm - I agree with Polwart .. the above is total twaddle....
__________________
PeterM is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26 March 2011, 18:56   #6
Member
 
Vandad's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: London
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 8m +
Engine: 250hp
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 195
Quote:
Originally Posted by PeterM View Post
Hmmmmm - I agree with Polwart .. the above is total twaddle....
Twaddle?! Thanks....


To Polwart: Yes, no insurer will cover you if you cruise on a boat not suitable for a particular sea condition. For your information, even if something happens to one of your crews, the skipper of the boat must be able to prove (to the court) that he has taken all necessary measures to prevent it. The key thing is to prove that the vessel was capable of that particular sea condition!

A class C is not supposed to go far from the shore as it is classed as Inshore.

If you don't believe me, check with your insurer!! simple!
__________________
Vandad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26 March 2011, 20:03   #7
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Truro-Cornwall & Brazil
Boat name: Bananas in Blue
Make: Humber Destroyer 5.5
Length: 5m +
Engine: E-Tec 115
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 385
So as far as my insurance company is concerned one of humbers 3.1m SIBs with a 10hp outboard is just as challenged/dangerous in any given sea state as a 5.8m destroyer with a 130HP outboard as they have the same rcd rating?
__________________
Markyboyo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26 March 2011, 20:38   #8
RIBnet admin team
 
Poly's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Boat name: imposter
Make: FunYak
Length: 3m +
Engine: 2 stroke YAM 20 HP
MMSI: 235089819
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 10,114
Vandad,


Quote:
A class C is not supposed to go far from the shore as it is classed as Inshore.
I refer you to the definition of Design Category C. Do tell me how far I am "supposed" to go in my Cat C vessel...

Quote:
If you don't believe me, check with your insurer!! simple!
I have - I'm insured for use in UK/Irish Coastal Waters.

You might find this thread interesting - it includes a very brief exchange on the subject.
You will probably also find this interesting (the final paragraph almost supports your claim - except this is a single instance of an insurer not putting a boat "on risk" rather than refusing a claim). However even if insurers were to match design categories to coverage ranges - a Cat C vessel would be covered in UK Coastal Waters (which most insurers seem to treat as 12 miles off the coast).
__________________
Poly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27 March 2011, 06:19   #9
RIBnet supporter
 
gotchiguy's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Dinard, Brittany
Boat name: Into the Red
Make: Osprey Vipermax
Length: 7m +
Engine: Evinrude E-tec 250HO
MMSI: 235 076 114
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 1,948
RIBase
Quote:
Originally Posted by Markyboyo View Post
So as far as my insurance company is concerned one of humbers 3.1m SIBs with a 10hp outboard is just as challenged/dangerous in any given sea state as a 5.8m destroyer with a 130HP outboard as they have the same rcd rating?
The 7m Vipermax with a 250HO is also rcd category C. It's only the big manufacturers that can afford to pay for the certification. B is alot more expensive to obtain than C and due to the fact that it offers very little benefit, most don't bother. Oh and we're insured from the Canaries to the Shetlands
__________________
gotchiguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27 March 2011, 06:42   #10
Member
 
Channel Ribs's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Channel Islands
Town: Alderney
Length: no boat
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 3,047
Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart View Post
the final paragraph almost supports your claim - except this is a single instance of an insurer not putting a boat "on risk" rather than refusing a claim
The para:

"Update : Autumn 2010 : We are now aware that an insurer has refused to place a Category C craft on risk for offshore use in Norway. This is in spite of the fact that the craft a Grand Banks Trawler, is of a design known to be suitable for offshore passage making. This is the first case to our knowledge where an insurer has restricted use based on the Design Category. Though not yet a policy within the industry as a whole it is likely that this will occur over time."

Perhaps if Vandad has had something similar then the predicted trend is beginning?
__________________

__________________
Channel Ribs is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 11:02.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.