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Old 27 February 2007, 08:05   #11
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Country: UK - Wales
Town: swansea
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If a certain boatbuilder hadn't ripped me off and cheated me out of a trailer I would probably keep the boat out of the water as well.
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Old 27 February 2007, 08:09   #12
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Originally Posted by pathalla View Post
Cod most likely does not want to prematurely wear his Landy to pieces pulling his monstrous Prosport rib back and forth to the sea, quite bothersome for a chap really... May I suggest a vehicle of a slightly higher standard? Mercedes my good man, the huns may have lost the Great War, but they ARE winning the battle for market share... I shall be using German technology to transport my own nondescript rib to and fro this coming spring.. No Fords, Chevys, Landies or Hummers for me! Sieg Heil!!
Would love to see that in soft sand or on slippery ground - most interesting.

And talking of pulling power I was once asked to drag an Iveco van(bigger than that Merc) with twin rear wheels. The rear brakes had seized and nothing would shift them. The bloke had been ordered to move the van so he asked for a tow. I wasn't using my discovery but the auto TD5 I had on lease. The discovery towed it so easily - with all 4 rear tyres smoking down the road.

Eventually the 4 tyres burst and you could see a set of tramlines down the road all the way to the lorry park where I had to dump it. Didn't even need low ration - I really was shocked just how easy it was. By the way the van still had a load of stuff in it.
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Old 27 February 2007, 10:15   #13
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Originally Posted by codprawn View Post
Would love to see that in soft sand or on slippery ground - most interesting.

And talking of pulling power I was once asked to drag an Iveco van(bigger than that Merc) with twin rear wheels. The rear brakes had seized and nothing would shift them. The bloke had been ordered to move the van so he asked for a tow. I wasn't using my discovery but the auto TD5 I had on lease. The discovery towed it so easily - with all 4 rear tyres smoking down the road.

Eventually the 4 tyres burst and you could see a set of tramlines down the road all the way to the lorry park where I had to dump it. Didn't even need low ration - I really was shocked just how easy it was. By the way the van still had a load of stuff in it.
Cod, if I ever get my little van stuck on a slippery slope, I will definitely give you a call!
Time for a boat picture, don't you think??
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Old 27 February 2007, 10:21   #14
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Town: Stanley, Falkland Is
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But Cod they could have followed the skidmarks so you could not have got away with nicking it

Rear wheels tend to unload as you take the strain so it is not hard to drag a vehicle along with the rear wheels locked - that is why cars have brakes on the front too try stopping a motorbike from high speed with just the back brake for a good demonstration

Just to p&ss everybody off who pays high marina charges, the local "marina" (actually two pontoons which currently have a grand total of one small zodiac attached) costs 1 per metre per week for local vessels, so the six month summer season comes in at about 150
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Old 27 February 2007, 11:28   #15
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The ramp gets busy on holiday weekends, so I just plop it in early, then go back to the house for breakfast... And "car gas" is about 10-15% less expensive than "boat gas" at the wharf...
Typically, marina gas here is more like a 33 to 50% markup over street gas.

Nice to have to trailer, sometimes.

jky
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Old 27 February 2007, 12:35   #16
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But Cod they could have followed the skidmarks so you could not have got away with nicking it

Rear wheels tend to unload as you take the strain so it is not hard to drag a vehicle along with the rear wheels locked - that is why cars have brakes on the front too try stopping a motorbike from high speed with just the back brake for a good demonstration

Just to p&ss everybody off who pays high marina charges, the local "marina" (actually two pontoons which currently have a grand total of one small zodiac attached) costs 1 per metre per week for local vessels, so the six month summer season comes in at about 150
Yes we thought of that as well.....

I know rear wheels unload but it did have 2 tons o stuff over the rear axle!!!

I pay about 800 a year for our marina - the main one in Swansea is 1800 for the same size boat but the tidal access is way better.
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Old 27 February 2007, 15:11   #17
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I have always launched my boats and kept them at home. Im keeping my new RIB in a marina and I will never look back. It's so much better! No more getting all the kit into the car, driving down to the slip, launching, ragging the clutch on the slip, parking, locking the trailer up etc. Just go down to the pontoon, get all my kit on (which I leave locked in the boat) and go. Petrol in Portsmouth harbour isn't that bad compared to most - 96p a litre.
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Old 28 February 2007, 12:17   #18
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Im keeping my new RIB in a marina and I will never look back. It's so much better! No more getting all the kit into the car, driving down to the slip, launching, ragging the clutch on the slip, parking, locking the trailer up etc.
I have an automatic. I don't lock the trailer up. Talk to me after hull-cleaning time.

In truth, I do most of my boating about 100 miles away from home (that's where the diving is.) I probably could find a storage yard to leave it closer to my preferred ramp, but I do much piddling around on the boat, so having it at home is worth it to me.

jky
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Old 28 February 2007, 14:55   #19
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Originally Posted by Tim M View Post
I have always launched my boats and kept them at home. Im keeping my new RIB in a marina and I will never look back. It's so much better! No more getting all the kit into the car, driving down to the slip, launching, ragging the clutch on the slip, parking, locking the trailer up etc. Just go down to the pontoon, get all my kit on (which I leave locked in the boat) and go. Petrol in Portsmouth harbour isn't that bad compared to most - 96p a litre.
I leave my kit in the boat too, the double jockey seat I fitted has come in more useful for storage than seating. No clutch problems being a Defender it will tow a house in 1st low range, and I can happily leave my trailer anywhere because there's only one boat that fits it round here

Also I found working on the boat away from the house is a PITA because you invariably forget something and if I need to pump up my tubes (which I do a lot at the moment...) I have a compressor in the garage less than a dozen yards from the boat which is sooo much less effort than a hand pump.

The only real advantage when I had it alongside a pontoon was that you could go for a quick "refreshing blast" for 20 min after work and I wouldn't bother doing that if I had to launch and recover.
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