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Old 20 September 2008, 16:10   #51
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leaving the boat is asking not to be found. Stay with the boat, sit on the upturned hull and you present a much bigger target for sar units. Over the years there have been a number of incidents where one guy has stayed with the boat whilst the other swam for help. Often the guy with the boat has been rescued whilst the swimmer has been lost. A couple of years ago a training boat rolled on a course in the uk, a rib. According to the investigation afterwards the boat was difficult to right afterwards in the dock even with a crane cos of basically "stiction" between the boat and the water.
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Indeed...safety is no joking matter
So what are you saying - did you believe your post to be serious advice
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Old 22 September 2008, 19:29   #52
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you will stand a better chance in righting a sib than a rib of similar size owing to the fact of what wavelength just said about suction or stiction unless the sea was rough ,with a sib the boat will twist allowing air in but ribs are more rigid , though i think that even wearing a lifejacket you could get under the hull to recover flares ect , have a look on you tube under rnli capsize theres quite a few vids now that show both sibs and ribs upside down on training exercises both in the pool and open water .though wearing a dry suit and knowing that you are going upsidedown helps .if you are that concerned about going over have got no chance in righting your boat and you carry flare containers strapped or fastened to the a frame you could have or make a quick release so they could be kicked free or recovered by a lanyard ,inside a spare h/h vhf and a couple of survival bags, though trying to hold to the top of a rolling hull it wont be camping but could save your life .
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Old 23 September 2008, 05:20   #53
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you will stand a better chance in righting a sib than a rib of similar size owing to the fact of what wavelength just said about suction or stiction unless the sea was rough ,with a sib the boat will twist allowing air in but ribs are more rigid , though i think that even wearing a lifejacket you could get under the hull to recover flares ect , have a look on you tube under rnli capsize theres quite a few vids now that show both sibs and ribs upside down on training exercises both in the pool and open water .though wearing a dry suit and knowing that you are going upsidedown helps .if you are that concerned about going over have got no chance in righting your boat and you carry flare containers strapped or fastened to the a frame you could have or make a quick release so they could be kicked free or recovered by a lanyard ,inside a spare h/h vhf and a couple of survival bags, though trying to hold to the top of a rolling hull it wont be camping but could save your life .
do you think that it is easier if you have a short transom so that their is less air pocket?
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Old 23 September 2008, 05:54   #54
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You could deflate a toob section near the bow (which will be sitting higher anyway) to break the vacuum.
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Old 23 September 2008, 08:17   #55
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do you think that it is easier if you have a short transom so that their is less air pocket?
i think it would help a lot ,though i suppose lifting an upturned boat straight up with a crane would have a greater suction effect than rolling it over on one side,and i would imagine that a certain amount of air will vent through the self bailers ,
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