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Old 02 February 2019, 09:30   #1
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New to the sport

Hi guys

Im absolutely new to the sport, and need a little help

I picked up a Honwave T40 with a Honda 6hp (i know, not the quickest so im told).

Need some advice on the following

1. Best beginners book
2. What should we carry onboard every time we sail.
3. What lifejacket should we buy, make etc
4. Type of clothing
5. Do i need a radio, if so what type... vhf or 8.33
6. General advice courses etc tobecome proficient

In may, Me and the mrs are off up to lochgpenhead and around lochfyne. And wondered if any one else had been that way... whst advice can you give

Thank you in advance

GT
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Old 02 February 2019, 10:37   #2
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It might be a good idea to look at all posts initiated by The Gurnard.
A great deal of it is MUCH too advanced for you, but will capture your imagination and sell you on this type of boating for life.

Although his is "advanced sibbing", everything he says is fulll of wisdom and will not steer you wrong. His advice on what to carry and do is unparalled as are his videos which display masterful camera work.
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Old 02 February 2019, 12:15   #3
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Brian is right gurnard has loads of expeariance a good place to start is the RNLI web site for all the safety gear also a power boat level 1 course is a must if your brand new to the sport IMO

This is helpful too

https://www.boatstogo.com/faq.asp#30
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Old 02 February 2019, 12:41   #4
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Hey thanks guys ..Im not sure I deserve such compliments though.

I only go by what I was taught by my father ..he loved the sea and passed that love onto me.

The best advice I can give you GT912 was some advice my grandfather gave me as a younster. He was a gardener by trade but I find his words true to everything I do.

He told me “Plant small to grow tall” “If you plant big ..it takes longer for the tree to establish .. than if you plant small”

In other words .. start with small outings in calm weather and keep close to shore.. building your experience as you go. Slowly go on to longer journeys in slightly rougher conditions and build your own confidence.

Dont take risks.. the sea will always win. Always plan and know where you are going.

That way you will enjoy the experience and hopefully it will turn into a life long love of the sea.

This video should get you interested in Loch Fyne ..there are a hundred or so on my you tube channel

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Old 02 February 2019, 13:19   #5
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Wow... excellent... do you think thst is too much for simeone new to the sport....

How do you know how deep the water is and where the reefs are ...

What kit do you have on-board
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Old 02 February 2019, 14:25   #6
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Originally Posted by GT912 View Post
Wow... excellent... do you think thst is too much for simeone new to the sport....

How do you know how deep the water is and where the reefs are ...

What kit do you have on-board
Yup you do need to know where the reefs are. There is a nasty lot off Otter Ferry and at Minard Islands.. so watch for them. Charts give the info you need. Here is an example for LochGilphead area.. you can scroll around and zoom in and out etc

https://eoceanic.com/map.php?latitud...oom=10&chart=1

Check the SIB section of this forum on what others carry..it covers everything.You can then chose what you want to carry.

What kit do you carry on your SIB?

I started in Loch Fyne many many years ago. Its a great place to start..but there have also been many lives lost there so start in calm weather..and keep close to shore. if you see white waves off the shore..its not good for a beginner so dont go out.

When I started I always went towards the wind and waves..the reason being..if they became bigger (and it changes all the time minute by minute) ..its easier getting back with them behind me and blowing me along rather than fight into them. You will need to learn tides and when to use them to your advantage.

Another piece of local advice my father gave me was dont go near any water that says “Sound of Jura” on it until you absolutely know what you are doing. It has very strong tides. So my advice is dont learn off the other side of Lochgilphead ..example off Crinan.

Staying in Loch Sween is good for beginners and generally very sheltered.. even more so than Loch Fyne. Loch Goil is another sheltered one in the area. Be sensible and you will be fine.

This time of year its best researching and getting your gear together..the cold water can kill very quickly. If you are thinking of going this time of year.. consider a drysuit ..it could save your life and they are getting cheaper. You can get a reasonable one for a couple of hundred quid and it will last a few years too.

Think of approved courses if you wish to go that route PB2 is often recommended.

Hope that helps.
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Old 02 February 2019, 15:07   #7
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If you're committed to Lochgilphead, a good safe place to start is in Loch Gair just a few miles north. Very sheltered and as you get more confident you could stick your nose out into Loch Fyne
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Old 02 February 2019, 17:53   #8
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Hi GT and welcome to the forum... you a fireman?

You know every time I see someone starting out from scratch coming on here I think it's quite overwhelming to think of all the info we could pass on from shared long experience.

I wondered how Gurnard would approach it and he's right with start small.

Getting the knack of setting up the SIB & OB, packing the kit, remembering everything and launching... then retrieving at the end of the day to reverse the procedure... is experience to be gained in itself even before you go anywhere.

Even if you do venture out into slightly more interesting conditions launching somewhere calm with no tidal flow is the best way to start so you can calmly get used to sorting yourself out.

I was lucky to inherit my experience as well as a few books. I still like this one as despite being written in the mid 70s SIBs and the sea are basically the same. Safety and nav equipment have massively improved though.

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Inflatable-.../dp/0720708338

Yep look at the link Gurnard gave on what kit and come back with any queries.

Have a look at the RNLI lifejacket guide... https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...KfRXDzSh2qolRe

Clothing quite a personal choice. I'm mostly out in decent to very good weather and started out with shorts, beach shoes, t-shirt/fleece/Mountain Warehouse type waterproof coat (always carried all three and wore most appropriate).

I now wear wetsuit trousers, dinghy boots, rash vest then t-shirt/fleece/sailing waterproof as weather dictates. Always a hat and buff. It can seem really warm at the beach/slipway but much colder moving on the water particularly if it clouds over on a sunny day. See image below. Daughter is wearing a full wetsuit and budget jacket.

Note on that day I'm using what you'd call a Kayak buoyancy aid with 70N support, daughters is a foam 100N type. We have access to 150N self inflating types too which is what I ought to advise you to be on the safe side and what Mrs F always wears.

You don't need a VHF but could get you out of a lot of trouble so advised... a marine VHF type. You need a licence to operate after doing a days course but emergency distress use is allowed without. Choice of VHF is best asked in a separate thread... or searches on previous threads.

As said above PB1 the starter course. Also and possibly as good as anything... buddying up on some trips.

You need to look at charts or a mapping GPS (expensive) to plan a trip. Online versions here...

https://webapp.navionics.com/?lang=e...ruI%60ta%60%40
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Old 03 February 2019, 03:12   #9
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I agree have a good read through this forum, plenty of decent advice for newbies, plus book yourself on a PB2 course where you will learns loads, perhaps also do a day skipper evening course, there is nothing like doing a course with a number of people to share experiences and learn from each other.
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Old 03 February 2019, 14:12   #10
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Here in the US sibbing is a bit different than in the UK.
It seems to me that you guys in the UK have a much higher ratio of smaller boats and a real love for sibs and ribs. This makes a new boater and inflatable owner can find another similarly equipped enthusiast to hook up with to quickly learn a lot of doos and donts. That’s what I would do, definitely!
Here in the states generally sibs are something put on the back of a yacht.
Where I boat I have yet to see another sib.
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Old 03 February 2019, 14:38   #11
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SIB Insurance

Thank all so much for your input, i now have a detailed list of what to look at. However, anyone have advice for insurance and what to get

GT
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Old 03 February 2019, 14:56   #12
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Here in the US sibbing is a bit different than in the UK.
It seems to me that you guys in the UK have a much higher ratio of smaller boats and a real love for sibs and ribs. This makes a new boater and inflatable owner can find another similarly equipped enthusiast to hook up with to quickly learn a lot of doos and donts. That’s what I would do, definitely!
Here in the states generally sibs are something put on the back of a yacht.
Where I boat I have yet to see another sib.
A lot are budget driven and a lot I include myself started out with a sib for me I like the challenge and the nostalgure the sib brings and of course no boat does it all, over here on the coast,river,cove etc are full of boats of all kinds sailing is big too.
The sib will get you anywhere fairly quickly if the weather is decent.
Boating buddies arnt that easy to find especially if you live inland like me but this forum changed that for me when all my mates stopped boating so I found ribnet.
the problem I suspect for you is the states are massive and so far for like minded folks to travel.
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Old 03 February 2019, 17:26   #13
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Craftinsure online are usually the best value and easiest. All online and print docs at home.

About £50/yr for your outfit. Choose Small Boat-Motor category.
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