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Old 02 October 2017, 10:10   #11
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Originally Posted by Oilystairs View Post
Hi again, I removed the cone from the tube using a heat gun and a blunt screwdriver to ease open the seam. The new ones I sourced fit well. One question though; on the inside of the tube, the main seams and the cone were glued normally and the seam overlaps are bonded using what looks like sikaflex caulk/mastic. Does anyone have any idea how to remove this as the heat doesn't seem to soften it much. I'll post a photo
Use a grinder with a small stone bit. You will need to sand the material before gluing anyways.
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Old 02 October 2017, 11:30   #12
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Thank you. That is tough stuff
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Old 02 October 2017, 16:04   #13
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That caulk looks like 'no more nails'. Jeez, it never ceases to amaze me the extent some folk will take for a cheap fix!

Take your time, preparation is everything.
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Old 02 October 2017, 18:31   #14
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That caulk looks like 'no more nails'. Jeez, it never ceases to amaze me the extent some folk will take for a cheap fix!

Take your time, preparation is everything.
It's probably factory mastic, used to prevent seepage.

Sikaflex 221
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Old 10 October 2017, 15:31   #15
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Hi, I have successfully replaced the first cone on the port tube and the bow and port tube are holding air perfectly. The starboard cone is seeping so I am halfway through replacing that and tidying up several old repairs where the patches were starting to peel on the corners (including the zodiac labels) I am photographing the second cone in stages to help future members of this forum. The main "trick" which has been invaluable has been wrapping the cone in polythene to stop it touching the freshly glued inside of the tube as you insert through the aperture. Once placed into position, it is possible to carefully ease the polythene out and secure the gluing. I'll post photos once it is all finished.
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Old 10 October 2017, 15:40   #16
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I am also fixing the inflatable keel which has a burst seam (not the ends so I think it is repairable). I literally pulled the whole thing out from the floor of the boat really easily and I was wondering if hypalon glue should be used to glue it back in to the boat or whether something like sikaflex might hold better? The whole area seemed to be a magnet for grime and sand
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Old 12 October 2017, 09:35   #17
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So here is my step by step cone replacement for my Zodiac Mk2 from the late 70's - the cones were very perished and were badly leaking:

Previously I had sourced the right type of cone for the material of my boat (in my case Hypalon), some polythene sheeting (left overs from a polytunnel cover) and some hypalon to use as a cuff as well as the usual glueing materials of course.

Firstly you need to remove the old cuff between the tube end and the old cone - this is a simple matter of using the heat gun and a pair of pliers to pull the cuff off. Use the old cuff as a template to cut out a new cuff to put back on later.

Secondly using the heatgun again and a blunt screwdriver, carefully ease the tube end away from the old cone on the inside of the tube. At the lip of the old cone on the inside of the tube end is some nasty hard white mastic that you need to force your way through with the screwdriver.

Use a knife and dremel, clean up the inside of the tube end and remove all the old glue and mastic, then clean out the tube with an old hoover.

Prepare the new surfaces to glue - sand the new cone (up to the bevel) with 80 grit paper and do the same to the inside of the tube. Wipe all of it down with solvent.

Using the cuff as a model, cut out a much wider (perhaps 2 inches wider) piece of thick polythene that will entirely cover the new cone's area that will be glued. This is to stop the inside of the end of the tube and the cone from coming into contact once the glues are applied while the cone is slid into the tube. Have a practice before glueing so you know how hard it will be to remove the polythene once it comes time for glued assembly.

Start the glueing process as you would with any repair respecting the humidity and temperature requirements of your glue.

Once the glue has gone off, secure the strip of polythene around the glue on the new cone and secure the polythene on the outer edge (the bit towards the point of the cone) only with a piece of selotape. Squash the cone and slide it through the end of the tube aperture and manoeuvre the cone into as good a position as possible. Carefully undo the selotape and start to ease the polythene out through the gap. It will take some force and some wiggling to get the polythene out and it might catch in some places but with plenty of wiggling, cursing and forcing, the polythene will come out and the cone will be set into a perfect position.

Using a roller or screwdriver handle, push all surfaces of the tube end on to the cone to be sure the glue has taken and then start preparing to glue on the new cuff on to the outside of the new cone and the end of the tube.
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Old 12 October 2017, 09:39   #18
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Cone replacement part 2

I left 24 hours to allow the glue to set inside the tube before glueing on my new cuff. Here are two more photos
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