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Old 24 September 2012, 17:57   #1
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Winter care for my new outboard

Hi all,

I have a bunch of questions about winterizing my outboard. Forgive me that Iíve itemized them, I just want to make sure I got them all in order in my head!

I have a new Honda 15HP 4-stroke. I bought it 3 months ago, so it has about 30 hours on it. As per the instructions, there are several things that need to be greased, checked, and/or replaced. I have the book right in front of me, but am too lazy to reach down and get it. Anyway. With winter coming up, I figure I can do the winterizing AND the maintenance in one shot. Though, now I donít have the money to get anything done! So hereís where Iím at. I brought the engine in the house, and itís in a room that is under construction (i.e. Ė will most likely remain unfinished until the start of next season!). So it will be safe and undisturbed where its at.

I havenít built a motor stand yet, so the motor (which feels heavy) is resting on the metal prop protector thing in a corner of the room. Could that prop thing crack with all the weight on it?

I chose to keep it upstairs instead of in the basement. I was afraid the flame of the water heater could ignite the residual fuel in the motor. Could that happen?

If I donít get around to the maintenance in the next couple of months, would that harm the engine? As stated, it has about 30 hours on it, and Iíve not done any maintenance to it yet. With the holidays coming around, not sure if I will have the funds until January!

Any advice would be VERY much appreciated. I am lost with this stuff!

Thank you!
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Old 24 September 2012, 18:59   #2
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Where are you located? In much of the US, there isn't a whole lot to be done for winter except run it on muffs or in a tub every now and then (once or twice a month should be fine.)

If you do actually have a winter (I don't, in north-central California), and are planning on leaving the boat idle throughout, grease the tilt and steering tubes (should be zerk fittings, and you should do this now and then even during the boating season), remove the prop, fog the motor, drain the carbs (if carb-equipped), and manipulate the engine to get as much liquid cooling water out as possible (or run it in a tank of water with anti-freeze, after which residual water will be much less a concern.)

Biggest problems will be corrosion from residual salt, evaporation/varnishing of fuel, and freezing (and resulting expansion cracking) of any water left in the motor. If it's inside the last won't be an issue. I would still run a decent amount of stabilized fuel through it to prevent the varnishing problems, and fog or try to run it now and then to keep everything oil coated.

If the motor is supporting itself on the skeg, it's likely fine; OTOH a sawhorse is cheap and will support it off the skeg. One less thing to worry about.

I doubt you'd have a problem with the heater causing an explosion with fuel in the motor, though I suppose there is a miniscule chance it could happen. Any kind of ventilation downstairs would likely negate that risk, though.

There may be a few things I'm missing; I'm sure someone who actually winterises wil chime in here.

jky
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Old 01 October 2012, 03:28   #3
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build a sawhorse out of 4x2 i`ll try to upload a photo of mine... get rid of all fuel by allowing the engine to run when tank is empty(this will burn off any unspent fuel) do run in a tank of clean water, though your impellor should be good for another couple of seasons..remove spark plugs and clean up ends ( i shouldn`t think emery cloth is needed) now spray the inside of engine with fogging spray ..polish exterior with a car wax .... you could change the oil too ,both engine and gear box ,but i wouldn`t for a new engine but i`m guessing some would
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Old 01 October 2012, 11:26   #4
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build a sawhorse out of 4x2 i`ll try to upload a photo of mine... get rid of all fuel by allowing the engine to run when tank is empty(this will burn off any unspent fuel)
In most cases on small engines (those with dry-break couplings), disonnecting the fuel line won't work. The dry break cuts off the fuel line, so you pull a vacuum on the line before the fuel is burned.

Faster and easier to stabilize the fuel and run it for a decent length of time (a half hour or so) to get the stabilized fuel into the system.


Quote:
do run in a tank of clean water, though your impellor should be good for another couple of seasons..
If you live in a hard-freeze climate, you want to make sure you get all the water out. Freezing water within the motor cracks stuff. Hence the anti-freeze recommendation.


Quote:
you could change the oil too ,both engine and gear box ,but i wouldn`t for a new engine but i`m guessing some would
New engine, never serviced, I'd suggest changing both. The first few hours of running are the most productive for particles in oil. After that, it's more a matter of acids and salts that get into the oil (combustion by-products, salt water contamination.)

Just my opinions;

jky
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Old 01 October 2012, 12:21   #5
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Thanks guys. This is all good stuff, but sounds much too much for me to handle. So I'll be bringing it to a place nearby. It is an authorized Honda service center and are asking $200 to do the maintenance and winterze it. Does that sound reasonable?
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Old 01 October 2012, 12:23   #6
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Originally Posted by jyasaki View Post
In most cases on small engines (those with dry-break couplings), disonnecting the fuel line won't work. The dry break cuts off the fuel line, so you pull a vacuum on the line before the fuel is burned.

Faster and easier to stabilize the fuel and run it for a decent length of time (a half hour or so) to get the stabilized fuel into the system.




If you live in a hard-freeze climate, you want to make sure you get all the water out. Freezing water within the motor cracks stuff. Hence the anti-freeze recommendation.




New engine, never serviced, I'd suggest changing both. The first few hours of running are the most productive for particles in oil. After that, it's more a matter of acids and salts that get into the oil (combustion by-products, salt water contamination.)

Just my opinions;

jky
can`t please em all

i had no problems with both my engines burning off unspent fuel as recommended by chandlery

good idea with antifreeze mind gonna pinch that one though if you stand your engine up most should drain out,if your storing in a basement/indoors i can`t see a hard freeze problem but hey belt n braces eh

and of course a new engine there will be lots of particles and contaminition ,i changed my oil as per manufacturers instructions on the service date,can`t remember how many hours in

but again just my opinion
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Old 01 October 2012, 12:32   #7
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Originally Posted by BuffsBoat View Post
Thanks guys. This is all good stuff, but sounds much too much for me to handle. So I'll be bringing it to a place nearby. It is an authorized Honda service center and are asking $200 to do the maintenance and winterze it. Does that sound reasonable?
thats about £120 for about 30 mins work and £30 in parts ,i would say it`s a bit steep and to phone around....but hey i don`t know the prices over there

if your worried about doing it yourself ,try doing it with the marine mechanic on a saturday morning ,it is fairly easy even with our differences lol
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Old 01 October 2012, 12:34   #8
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Originally Posted by BuffsBoat View Post
Thanks guys. This is all good stuff, but sounds much too much for me to handle. So I'll be bringing it to a place nearby. It is an authorized Honda service center and are asking $200 to do the maintenance and winterze it. Does that sound reasonable?
Not a bad price, just realize that all of the above takes about 75minutes and $40 in oil filters and oils. And all the steps are in your owners manual.
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Old 01 October 2012, 14:03   #9
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In most cases on small engines (those with dry-break couplings), disonnecting the fuel line won't work. The dry break cuts off the fuel line, so you pull a vacuum on the line before the fuel is burned.
Just press the little plunger tip at the fuel inlet to open the line and let the engine draw the fuel from the bowl. At higher revs it might have enough suction from the pump to pull the valve open enough to let air in. The engine pump does have to draw fuel up from the tank in most installations. In my case it is about 2 feet of vertical lift.
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Old 01 October 2012, 14:08   #10
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What about all the outboard motors that sit on boats in the water all year round, they don't get "winterized" and they seem to survive OK.
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