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Old 17 August 2014, 12:05   #1
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What Tube Material ?

Hi guys, just trying to figure out what material my sib is.

Will it be Hypalon or PVC ?


It is 3.8 meter length, with rigid keel.

I see that majority of modern boats this size have 3 tubes for back up, this one has only 2 tubes.

Should I be concerned about this from a safety point of view ?
Intend using it for sea fishing, a mile or off the coast.

What would be the typical course of action if puncturing 1 of the tubes ?
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Old 18 August 2014, 10:39   #2
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Had a good search around on the forum and found that Hypalon will be coloured black on the inside surface, but PVC and also PU fabric will be same colour both sides.

There is no information at all online about this brand of sib.

The tubes are also red on the inside - which means either PVC or PU.


Is there any differences to be aware of between these 2 material with regards to general care / cleaning and maintenance from UV damage etc, also adhesives and repairs, or can they both be treated the same way ?
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Old 18 August 2014, 10:54   #3
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PU fabric on consumer boats is relatively new (compared to hypalon and PVC); if it comes down to "not hypalon", I'd guess PVC.

Looks like at least some adhesives are suitable for both PVC and Urethane:
Clifton Urethane Adhesive at nrs.com

You'll have to research what's available to you and whether it's suitable or not.

jky
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Old 18 August 2014, 11:16   #4
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Thanks Jyasaki ! I'll check around see what is available here in UK.

Should I have any concerns about it having only 2 tubes rather than the usual 3+ ?
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Old 18 August 2014, 12:21   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighlandR View Post

Should I have any concerns about it having only 2 tubes rather than the usual 3+ ?
Not sure anyone can answer that question for you HighlandR.... because what may concern one person may not concern another. It could depend on where or how you intend using it..ie if there are other boats around if a tube does go down. Are you likely to use sharp bait knives near the tubes etc

To help decide ..Consider what will happen if one of the two tubes does deflate unexpectedly at sea. The other tube will keep the boat afloat.. but the engine and passengers may well pull the floor under the water ..so you may end up in the sea, holding onto the remaining inflated tube until help arrived.

In a three section boat..there is more chance the boat will remain upright..(although it could still get water in the boat if the deflated tube couldn’t be help up to keep water out) So three tubes is preferable.

However, I imagine the chance of a tube suddenly deflating at sea is quite rare unless you hit a submerged object, the boat material is that old the seam splits..or you accidentally puncture it with something sharp like a knife. A fish hook would probably only cause a slow leak..so when you notice it going soft ..you would head for shore straight away.

If I was happy the material and seams were in good condition..I would use it..if other boats were in the same area .. but Im not scared of being in water if the rare event that the worst happened. If you are not happy with anything..dont go far from shore until you know it is reliable (from your photos..it looks old ?) If you are not happy then get another boat you are happy with. Compared to your peace of mind.. a new inflatable is not so expensive ?

My opinion only.. based on what I think may happen if you do burst a tube.. other may disagree.
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Old 18 August 2014, 12:24   #6
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If my memory serves me correctly these Nautylatex boats were built by Mirage in a range of sizes and definitely in Hypalon coated fabric. They only had one air chamber per side and I would not suggest going very far with only two air chambers. With one chamber suffering damage the boat would be virtually useless and I would urge extreme caution if you do intend to take it one mile offshore!!
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Old 18 August 2014, 13:58   #7
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The valves are in a silly place too. Ideally if you had a small leak you should be able to top up on the way back. Good luck doing that ...

Commercially you'd risk assess this. What's the likelihood of failure and what's the likli consequence.

So older material makes the risk higher. Inability to top up and only 2 tubes.

So what can you do to mitigate risks... Either reduce likelihood or consequence. Reduce likelihood by inspect fabric, banning sharps, choosing launch sites carefully.

Reduce consequence by not being too far out, having multiple means of contacting help and signalling position. Carrying additional buoyancy couple of fenders? Personal gear etc.

You might spend as much reducing your consequence score to get the level down to the same as reducing the likelihood by buying modern fabric...
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Old 18 August 2014, 16:00   #8
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Gurnard, thanks for taking the time to type that long reply.

Christopher, Shinyshoe I like your commercial approach ! I really appreciate the points and facts you have mentioned, they all make perfect sense.

My main concern is having one or both tubes deflate then sink, making the boat useless as you said Gurnard, and not being able to use the motor to head back in.

I have no issue at all with going into the water, i have kayak fished for a few years and going in doesn't bother me, but on the sib- my Father will be with me most of the time and I'd hate for him to have to end up in the water and have the stress of hanging onto 1 tube while waiting for help to arrive.

Add to that the motor being submerged and damaged etc...

The boat is old Gurnard - but I have no idea just how old it is, Christopher ??

Every seam looks to be in really good condition.. the underside all round the seams are fully bonded to the fabric, but I am not familiar enough with these things or with how the material will fail - especially with it being old.

If a seam was to fail - would it tear and seperate all the way along ? ( such as having the floor fall out the bottom for example ? )

I have various signalling devices that I use for the kayak, vhf, flares etc. Also have some fenders that could be fixed to the tubes....

My main concern is to keep both tubes afloat enough to support the 2 of us and the engine, so that we have enough buoyancy to motor back to shore and/or be somewhat more comfortable while waiting for help to arrive should the engine fail too.

The boat will be inflated and stored on the trailer permanently, so I'm thinking it would be possible to fill or partly fill ( partly fill so that the air can still inflate the tube without being distorted by too much foam ) each tube with some type of waterproof expanding foam, or possibly packaging foam peanuts of some type..

The valve holes are large enough to funnel a load of those peanuts inside......

That would give enough redundant buoyancy should the worst happen and both tubes get deflated...?

Is this a practical solution to the problem ?
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Old 18 August 2014, 16:47   #9
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If the seam goes you'd often get a gap big enough to slide your hand in. Tubes permanently inflated is possibly good as soft before you go out should ring alarm bells...

Never heard of the bottom falling off a SIB.

People do do expanding foam. Not many. And they don't shout about how great it is... Foam selection would be important as some absorb water.

Packing chips almost certainly absorb water. Most are actually water soluble and edible ... Made from corn like skips crisps! How would you stop it leaking out the seam...
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Old 18 August 2014, 16:49   #10
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Some form of inner tube makes sense for a burst seam... But not for a stabbing as the tube would be stabbed too...
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