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Old 08 July 2011, 03:08   #11
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Excellent thread Willk

Those blue cased resuscitation masks are the same ones we supply to sailing clubs for their safety kits, they are cheap and light and if you ended up doing prolonged CRP on a casualty they really make a difference. In other words, well worth the space they take up.

The Peli I have to take when I am working on someone else's boat (ie I don't know what kit they have) is very similar - I will try and take a photo for comparison.
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Old 08 July 2011, 03:14   #12
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In addition to all of that plus what Max said, we carry an orange survival bag just incase someone does go over the side or get very wet it's a great thing to stick them in to keep them warm.
Try storing your kit in a "flare box" the big square (or round) waterproof containers that come in White, grey, yellow. There slightly bigger than you little case and allow for the little extras your looking at packing

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Old 08 July 2011, 03:47   #13
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At first sight I thought the white cloth was clean underwear, so as not to get Mom ashamed in case of accident...


Very interesting kit. Many of the items you take there are much more useful rather than fog horn and signaling mirror, mandatory in Spain.
Boat repair kits also mandatory in here, but never as efficient as a clamshell.

I have a tiny floating barrel just for emergency stuff (flares and all of that).
Sticked small instructions set in my portable summergible VHF, tied to a tiny buoy.

Cianoacrilate adhesive may be useful and it's small, even used at Viet war for open wounds! What about sugar candy and a plastic folded emergency blanket?

And about OCD - it's my belief this forum is a happy meeting point. Get and read ASAP: Peter D. Jeans "Seafaring Lore and Legend". Plenty of advice there to avoid bad luck, you bet.
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Old 08 July 2011, 05:24   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LyamGalpin View Post
Try storing your kit in a "flare box" the big square (or round) waterproof containers that come in White, grey, yellow. There slightly bigger than you little case
I don't know of anyone who has gone from a flare box to a Peli Case and ever thought of going back, flare boxes are flawed in too many ways to mention IMHO.

Peli Cases come in lots of sizes, here are just a few:

Military Spec Cases
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Old 08 July 2011, 05:36   #15
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All good points guys - keep them coming!

The pocket mask is indeed the odd piece - and I thought hard about including it. I want it on the boat as I'm around beaches and piers and other water users and I'm trained for CPR. I attended one geriatric heart attack casualty as first responder and she was puking all over the shop. Luckily she continued breathing unaided and I got to hand her over to the paramedics without the need to pucker up A close call and the Memory lives strong in me! There's nowhere else on the craft safe enough to store it.

Good point on the lekkie bits. However there's not a lot of/no wiring in the Tohatsu bar the kill switch, and I can short that with the pliers and duct tape. Might squeeze in a bit of wire and a connector...

Fuel fittings I am looking out for - the Tohatsu fittings are very durable being all metal and are also VERY pricey! On the "Get" list.

The survival bag is a definite yes. I have one that I will keep in the other bag with the ground gear - suitably protected. I don't rate the space blankets. It hasn't been a priority, as I dress for immersion, but I did have occassion to tow another SIB recently, and the shivering passenger got me thinking...

Azzurro -Clean underwear... hopefully things won't get that bad

Amalgamating tape - good idea and I used to carry it on the big boat (one for fuel lines). I think I can cut any leak out of the system very quickly, but a small piece might be handy for under the hood, if the need arose.

Space is at a premium on this boat. A flare box is just too big and will attract more heavy crap. Remember if fishing, I carry a plastic box (for the fish ) and a small tackle box and a cool bag (for the cool ). The rod has to be slung outside the tubes. The fuel tank is also on deck with the ground gear bag - getting cosy in there....

Thanks for the input - any more ideas?? All this will be food for thought for other mini-SIBbers too.
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Old 08 July 2011, 05:43   #16
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Tohatsu fittings are very durable being all metal and are also VERY pricey! On the "Get" list.
We fit unbranded ones that are 100% compatible with the Tohatsu, a tenner for the male ones and 15 for the females.
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Old 08 July 2011, 05:49   #17
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We fit unbranded ones that are 100% compatible with the Tohatsu, a tenner for the male ones and 15 for the females.
Interesting, are they tough and unbreakable?
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Old 08 July 2011, 05:50   #18
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Interesting, are they tough and unbreakable?
Depends how hard you try to break them!

I have not had to replace one yet, first tried one about 4 years ago.
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Old 08 July 2011, 06:03   #19
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And if the going goes tough...what about a freezer bag for the fish? I mean, from the supermarket. The fish, not the bag.
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Old 08 July 2011, 06:13   #20
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And if the going goes tough...what about a freezer bag for the fish? I mean, from the supermarket. The fish, not the bag.
Ah yes - but you have to land them into a box - hooks and knives and fish spines and SIBs - not a good cocktail

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I have not had to replace one yet, first tried one about 4 years ago.
Sounds like I should be OK with the pair I have then...
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