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Old 27 May 2013, 07:28   #1
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Turning over a SIB

Newbie here. I have a jp Marine 3.8 SIB. All up weight of hull and floor is 100 kg. I plan to carry it on a box trailer upside down as it might be the easiest way to get it on the trailer solo.
My question is - what is the trick to turning this boat over and getting it onto a trailer.
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Old 27 May 2013, 12:36   #2
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Welcome to Ribnet,

If you plan to tow it upside down at speed on a highway, bear in mind that wind will get under sib and act as a tent dragging car down. Iif possible modify box trailer, place 2 long bunks sit sib's tubes on top, strap well, surrounding air will slide much better as if it were navigating on a wind tunnel.

And get yoursef a least a extra trailer assistant, that size is near impossible to man handle solo...

Happy Boating
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Old 27 May 2013, 18:17   #3
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Thank you locozodiac. Attached are a couple of photos of a previous much lighter hull of what I was planning to do. I have found it very difficult to handle the JP Marine on my own and a couple of small slips. This hull has an aluminium floor, wheras the previous hull had an air floor. However I can probably move an empty hull and floor on my own short distances on a sandy beach. Then, when I have the hull beside the trailer I was hoping to flip the boat over sideways so that one of the tubes rests on planks placed accross the trailer and then slide the rest of the boat onto and across the trailer. However, at 100 kg I am not so sure even though I am probably lifting only 50 kg at a time.
Loading the hull at the end of a day's diving and fishing is a lot harder than unloading at the start of the day.
Trailer assistants are not always available.
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Old 27 May 2013, 18:28   #4
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Presumably one of the advantages of trailering a SIB rather than flat packing it is the thing is fully set up. But if you have it up side down the engine has to come off... etc.

If you are going for this then how about using a method simillar to the RNLI use to re-right a D Class... So you'd attach a rope to the port side lifeline take it across the boat and stand at the startboard side and lean back pulling rope. Boat should roll on its startboard tube.

Now if you has some transom wheels and they were in the UP possition (like you'd be at sea with) they'd now be in the down possition effectively and so you can manouvre the boat behind the box and the possibly lift bow and pull up?

Gonna put wear on bits that don't expect it?

Would you be better with an A frame lanunch trolley and modifying the box trailer to take the boat on the trolley like a sailing dinghy roadbase with launch trolley? It'd need a couple of brackets welded (or bolted) on as guides, ideally a roller on the back and a mount at the front for the lynch pin to connect to. Not major work provided the box structure is OK for attaching to...
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Old 27 May 2013, 18:46   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShinyShoe View Post
Presumably one of the advantages of trailering a SIB rather than flat packing it is the thing is fully set up. But if you have it up side down the engine has to come off... etc.

If you are going for this then how about using a method simillar to the RNLI use to re-right a D Class... So you'd attach a rope to the port side lifeline take it across the boat and stand at the startboard side and lean back pulling rope. Boat should roll on its startboard tube.

Now if you has some transom wheels and they were in the UP possition (like you'd be at sea with) they'd now be in the down possition effectively and so you can manouvre the boat behind the box and the possibly lift bow and pull up?

Gonna put wear on bits that don't expect it?

Would you be better with an A frame lanunch trolley and modifying the box trailer to take the boat on the trolley like a sailing dinghy roadbase with launch trolley? It'd need a couple of brackets welded (or bolted) on as guides, ideally a roller on the back and a mount at the front for the lynch pin to connect to. Not major work provided the box structure is OK for attaching to...
Thanks Shinyshoe.
I had made up a dolly that fits inside the box trailer. See photo. It works well until I load the boat onto the dolly in the water and try and drag it out of the water. Soft sand and subsurface obstructions like rocks and concrete make it near impossible even for 2 strong persons. Hence the accidents.
So I am trying to find a simpler alternative.
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Old 27 May 2013, 18:53   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ShinyShoe View Post

If you are going for this then how about using a method simillar to the RNLI use to re-right a D Class... So you'd attach a rope to the port side lifeline take it across the boat and stand at the startboard side and lean back pulling rope. Boat should roll on its startboard tube.

Now if you has some transom wheels and they were in the UP possition (like you'd be at sea with) they'd now be in the down possition effectively and so you can manouvre the boat behind the box and the possibly lift bow and pull up?

Gonna put wear on bits that don't expect it?

...
Thats an idea. Just like righting an upturned catamarine (oh the good old days).
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Old 27 May 2013, 19:04   #7
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you are going to damage something flipping a 100kg boat on land by yourself - if you are lucky it will be the boat not you.

sailing dinghy launch trolley, some sort of fold up ramp and maybe a winch would probably work. does your dolly have wheels?
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Old 28 May 2013, 03:33   #8
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This is what I have done all be with a lighter sib, if not try some large inflatable wheels on the dolly it will make a big difference!
Nick

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Old 28 May 2013, 07:52   #9
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you are going to damage something flipping a 100kg boat on land by yourself - if you are lucky it will be the boat not you.

sailing dinghy launch trolley, some sort of fold up ramp and maybe a winch would probably work. does your dolly have wheels?
I appreciate everybody's input. It is a wonder that isnt discussed more often.

Yes the dolly has wheels and I have aluminium fold up ramps. They are wheels that are bolted on transoms called Active Wheels. They are supposed to be usable for soft sand. However, they easily get caught up on obstructions such as rock and in this case the end of the concrete ramp even though the end of the ramp was covered in sand.

What about placing the boat besides the trailer and flipping it sideways on to the trailer rather than lengthways. The top of the cross beams on the trailer are about 650 - 700 mm above ground level.
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