Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 21 June 2012, 22:51   #11
Member
 
Peter_C's Avatar
 
Country: USA
Boat name: Uh...a kayak?
Length: 4m +
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 1,485
Use the same PVC glue for everything. If you can't find MEK at the hardware stores start calling around to automotive and other types of paint stores. They might have some left. Use Acetone to prep, and everything must have all old glue removed. I used scuffy pads to clean up the old glue with acetone while wearing chemical gloves.

When gluing it back on the glue is only good in the pot for a short time. Therefore you need to glue the transom in first, then work on putting the floor back in doing so in sections, as you mix a fresh pot. Buy a couple boxes of disposable brushes in like 2", 1", and what are called solder brushes from Harbor Freight. The glue adheres the two pieces of materiel, and will not need clamping or anything. When the two parts touch with the tacky glue between they will be almost inseparable. The key is the temperature has to be ideal, with low humidity, and time is a huge factor. You have to work efficiently and fast. Sometimes two people are good to have...and a few straps.

Yikes! I just went and looked at the photos. It gave me nightmares from doing mine, except your boat is toast. The peeling of the plastic layers is the sign of death. You can't patch over that much material. Or so my opinion goes. It is not worth the time and money to fix a boat that could blow a chamber at any time. Sorry probably not what you want to hear.

As a guess I would say over $180 in materials, and probably close to 40 hours to do it right.

2 quarts of this glue is what I wound up using. There is also a video to watch on repairing PCV.
http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.a...3&pdeptid=1032
__________________

__________________
Peter_C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 June 2012, 13:29   #12
Member
 
Peter_C's Avatar
 
Country: USA
Boat name: Uh...a kayak?
Length: 4m +
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 1,485
Use this video as more of a warning on how not to do it, but the general procedures are there. Just not the way he didn't stop and roll each section as it was glued down. Plus the second inside parts should have been completely removed and glued back in after the bottom was on.



Ps I still don't think the op's boat is worth fixing.
__________________

__________________
Peter_C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 22 June 2012, 14:30   #13
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Seattle
Boat name: Water Dog
Make: Polaris
Length: 4m +
Engine: Yamaha 60hp
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 1,152
The OP's boat is not worth repairing and impossible to repair properly with those giant areas of delaminated fabric.
__________________
captnjack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 June 2012, 00:13   #14
MEE
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Jacksonville, Florida
Boat name: Blue Bomber
Make: Bombard
Length: 3m +
Engine: Outboard Nissan 8hp
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 47
I appritiate your frank an honest opinion about my boat, even if it is not what I wanted to hear.
My plan WAS to use the following internal sealant in both tube to seal one pin hole in one tube and gain some "design margin" in both tubes.
http://www.allboatproducts.com/Infla...ct-Sealer.html

I WAS then considering using the following product to coat over the area that have the exposed woven layer of the fabric.
http://www.allboatproducts.com/Infla...oat-Quart.html

Is this a valid technical approach to address the delamination of the areas on the top side of my main tubes? If so, the question would still come down to how cost effective it would be as these materials are costly and I would still have to buy the 2 quarts of sta bond glue plus misc. working materials?
Thanks again for the helpfull advice.
__________________
MEE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 23 June 2012, 01:37   #15
Member
 
Peter_C's Avatar
 
Country: USA
Boat name: Uh...a kayak?
Length: 4m +
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 1,485
The better question is are you going to have a DSC equipped radio onboard, or even better a P-EPIRP so the Coastie's can recover your butt when a tube blows? I wouldn't trust the fabric not to burst. Have you ever felt a properly inflated boat? The tubes get pretty taunt.

What about using it as a pool toy?
__________________
Peter_C is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 24 June 2012, 09:01   #16
MEE
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Jacksonville, Florida
Boat name: Blue Bomber
Make: Bombard
Length: 3m +
Engine: Outboard Nissan 8hp
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 47
I don't disagree that this is a major safety issue. If it is every put back into service it would only be used on small lakes or along with our 20 foot pro-line walkaround as a "supplementary vessel" / tender / towable / sea anchor
__________________
MEE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 July 2012, 22:41   #17
MEE
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Jacksonville, Florida
Boat name: Blue Bomber
Make: Bombard
Length: 3m +
Engine: Outboard Nissan 8hp
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 47
I have decided to procede with this restoration. I have ordered the materials from NRS. Sta-bond (tube joints), thickened G-flex (transum joints), MEK (pvc prep), toulene (rubber prep), aquaseal (scrim coating), cotol (thinner for aquaseal) and loon UV Urethane sealant (for my one tube pin hole). UPDATES to come.
__________________

__________________
MEE is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:10.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.