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Old 20 October 2011, 14:48   #11
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Pooler, Georgia
Boat name: not applicable
Make: Avon
Length: 3m +
Engine: Outboard
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 156
Take a look at runabouts with steering wheels and you will note that the helm is on the starboard side of the boat. This is to counteract the prop rotation which tries to lift the starboard side of the boat. Sitting on the port side of the boat increases the list to port. Sit on the starboard side which is the proper way to steer a small boat.

Once a boat is on plane, the weight should be shifted to the stern in order not to cause bow steering. If the boat runs with the front of the keel too deep, you can experience oversteer. Hit a wave wrong and you may flip suddenly.

Something like a Dole fin or Stingray on the cavitation plate should be helpful in your case, as it helps keep the bow down.

One question is whether or not you are trying to shorten the time to plane by tucking the motor in too close to the bottom of the transom? Many boats take a little time to reach planing speed. With power tilt, many tuck in the motor to assist in getting out of the hole and then trim out as speed increases. We generally do not have the luxury of power tilt on small motors.

I have been running small helm steered boats for 60 years now, and you may be in for a learning experience if you allow bow steering. If you do, expect to go swimming sooner or later
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Old 20 October 2011, 17:58   #12
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Country: South Africa
Town: East London
Boat name: Sealouse
Make: watersnake
Length: under 3m
Engine: Yamaha
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 5
Hi Frankc
Thanks for the reply , it is truly amazing that I can sit more than 10 thousand miles away and tap into the experience of someone with 60 years of doing this. You gotta love the internet .
I have no doubt that you are correct as I had originally set the boat up on the 3 rd hole of the manual tilt assembly as this was the best position to get the cavitation plate parallel to the floor. Unfortunately I had sent the trailer in for some mods and the tilt pin was "lost" , so I could only run fully trimmed in. New tilt pin arriving tomorrow so I will do a few more "river trials" on the weekend. I will try the starboard side, although as a righty it just seemed natural to have the tiller in my right hand ( the throttle and steering were however counter-intuitive this way, so starboard side may be better). I most certainly would like to avoid swimming - we have some critters with big teeth in our river mouths over the winter and early summer .
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Old 20 October 2011, 18:14   #13
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Country: USA
Town: Seattle
Boat name: Water Dog
Make: Polaris
Length: 4m +
Engine: Yamaha 60hp
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 1,152
Agree with the others, trim the motor out. At least 2 probably 3 holes. Bow steering is cause by having the forward part of the hull too far in the water. You want some bow lift. So you definitely don't want a doel-fin type thing for now which would press the bow even further down into the water.
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Old 20 October 2011, 22:21   #14
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Country: USA
Town: Pooler, Georgia
Boat name: not applicable
Make: Avon
Length: 3m +
Engine: Outboard
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 156
We use a Doel fin on our 25 HP running a 14 ft fiberglass boat. We porpoise like mad at full throttle without it. As it is on the cav plate, it does not force the bow down except when accelerating and then it really just helps with stern lift. We lose about 2 mph at top speed in calm water, but it still runs well. It is a dream in rough water and probably as fast or faster than running the motor without a fin. Boat stability is better with the fin.

If the tilt pin was lost, then it is understandable to try the boat without it. Just be careful when running like that as bow steer causes bad things to happen awfully fast. I have had the tiller do scarey things when trimmed like that. Having our old offshore rig left with the trim down and then hitting the throttle would always get to you if the water was rough. The boat would try to slew to the side before you realized it. Got the gray hair to prove it

Once you get the initial setup correct, you will find a boat is an enjoyable thing. I love the water.

Once you get accustomed to handling the tiller with your left hand, you will wonder why no one told you about that before. The side to side balance will be correct and the boat will handle much easier, especially in turns. Let me know what you think after getting a few hours on the boat while controlling from the starboard side.

I still am in awe of the internet. On a knife forum from England, people from Uragray to other distant points have been very helpful to me.
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