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Old 17 September 2012, 05:30   #1
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SIB floor

Hi,

I have got an avon 4m sib with 3 alloy floor sections and the front section being wood.

First time we put the inflatable up yesterday we had a few problems. I just wondered if anyone had any advice on these issues.

First we half inflated the tubes and left the keel deflated. We then put the floor in section by section then raised 2 sections and pushed it down flat. That worked fine.

Then we had to get the 2 side bars in which go at the side of the floor and curl under to hold it all together. Getting these side bars in took an hour alone. Is there a knack to this? It's the curling round part which seems to be the problem, getting it all the way under and locking the floor in place.

We were doing this on sand, does that matter?

The bar only locks the alloy part of the floor which is the rectangular section of the inflatable. The front wooden bit connects to the floor but doesn't lock at the sides as it goes to a point in the front of the boat.

Once we were out on the water with it what seemed to happen when doing a bit of speed and going into a smallish swell and hitting it was the the whole front section of the boat would bend upwards quite a bit (including the tubes and the wooden floor lifts up)

Any advice on any of this would be much appreciated.

Thanks
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Old 17 September 2012, 06:44   #2
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The side rails called stringers are a pain until you get the hang of it.

If you put the oars under the floor to raise the aluminium part of the floor this makes it a bit easier.

If you have your tubes half inflated at this stage that's to much. You only need a bit of air in the tubes to make the shape of the boat whilst fitting the floor.

The wooden part at the front is supposed to loose as you mentioned.

If your tubes are bending when under way you've not got enough air in the tubes.

Hope this helps.
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Old 17 September 2012, 07:21   #3
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Great advicefrom lockieboi.

I'd go further than saying putting oars under makes it a bit esier. On both my old Zodiac and current Honwave it makes a near impossible task a doddle.

Also in my experience it's best to do the floor with the smallest amount of air in the tube, about enough to half take shape. This is particularly important with the Honwave.
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Old 17 September 2012, 08:59   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fenlander View Post
I'd go further than saying putting oars under makes it a bit esier. On both my old Zodiac and current Honwave it makes a near impossible task a doddle.
On my old Zodiac it made an impossible task merely a monumental hassle. Getting the damn things out again was even harder! I've still got the scars to prove it.

It may get easier with practice, but unless the boat will be living on a trailer then it's air floor all the way for me.
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Old 17 September 2012, 10:15   #5
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Thanks all.

I can see how putting the paddles underneath would lift the floor off the ground and leave room to curl the stringer around into the gap underneath. By the time we got them in yesterday my hands had pretty much been sanded by a electric sander trying to curl them under the fabric.

Regarding the tubes, there are 3 chambers, right, left and front. It was only the front section which would bend upwards when hitting a wave. Sometimes nearly vertical. Admittedly it was in small chop, would only happen when we hit the peak of the swell coming head on and we were doing some speed (20mph?) I can live with that if that's what is meant to happen as long as it's not going to damage the tubes. The other chambers were fine and remained rock for a while. Do I just need more air in the front? What about the keel, how much air is recommended for that, rock solid or?

Thanks for the advice!
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Old 17 September 2012, 10:25   #6
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If the tubes are bending at all they are under inflated.
The correct pressure should be displayed on the CE plate on the transom.
My SIB (which is different to yours so don't quote me on this) is .25 bar in the tubes and .35 bar in the keel.
You need a pressure gauge really or like most would recommend a Bravo Electric pump which will shut of at required pressure. That's what I use.
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Old 17 September 2012, 14:24   #7
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Generally al sibs needs 3.0 to 3.5 psi on all chambers including keel to perform as expected, get a pressure gause and top sib to that pressure after some minutes resting on water for air to become stable. If you top keel to 0.35 bar which is about 5.0 psi will end bending bow wooden panel, cut up and breaking with time. 3.0 psi will be enough.

A faster way to insert alum side joiners is to have a completely defleated sib on flat surface, apply soapy water inside joiners groove and to both sides of all alum panels, procede to fit. Place oars under floor fabric if needed. Flat side of stringers should be inserted down on top floor fabric.

Happy Sibbing
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Old 18 September 2012, 11:50   #8
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I have a Zodiac SIB with solid floor, and to get the stringers in place the boat has to be on a flat surface, and inflated enough to keep the tubes in shape only.
I tried to install the stringers on an uneven surface and it was next to impossible, in fact I couldn't do it.
So I'm guessing that on sand you would have similar problems.
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Old 20 September 2012, 10:12   #9
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Last summer I mounted mine on the beach. Just place paddles down the boat, sponsons must be almost flat. It was very very fast.
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Old 21 September 2012, 02:55   #10
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Yes, using the paddles to level the floor is a good way to assemble the boat on sand or any uneven surface.
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