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Old 03 March 2019, 05:31   #71
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>>>“Teach a man to fish and he’ll turn around and try to teach you to fish like he invented it and you’re an idiot”

Ha ha… excellent.

I must admit despite talk of the old days and the lack of today's "essential" safety gear I was an early adopter of the stylish buoyancy aid...
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Old 03 March 2019, 05:33   #72
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Then a little later seeming not trusted with a challenging tack but at least keeping to the safety wear...
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Old 03 March 2019, 05:35   #73
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Then a little older in the Channel Isles when realisation dawned a good jumper was all the floatation you needed..
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Old 03 March 2019, 06:44   #74
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You are absolutely correct Fenlander .. there is no excuse for not wearing a life jacket or buoyancy aid.

We did although my limited choice of photos I have of those days possibly dont show that.

A crop of the three brothers in the boat wearing Kapok (sp?) lifejackets. My mother.. god bless her .. would have jumped in the back of the boat to pose for the photo as she too wore them when at sea.



And again the posing photo of the piccolo ..showing the yellow life jacket on the deck..it was always worn before setting off.



Because I have spent so much time on the water .. I confess that I have had a few hairy moments too.

The closest I came to death was when I overturned a kayak in the Clyde in late December seas around 2005. I was half a mile off Cumbrae coast and in those days did not have a drysuit. I was a good swimmer so swam to shore. I was far too cold to muster the energy to get back in the kayak ..despite my two companion kayakers trying to assist.

I hung onto the back of one of their kayaks as they paddled like mad for the shore ..I assisted with strongly kicking my legs. Classroom theory told me not to move..conserve heat ..but that for me in those circumstances was the wrong option when I could get to shore in a few moments.

I had no problems until I got to shore. It was a little later when I stood up and the bitter December wind chill on wet clothes and the shock of the incident that hypothermia started to kick in.

I do believe it was the survival bag that one of the guys carried that saved my life that day.

They took my sodden clothes off ..put me in the dry clothes we carried then wrapped me up in the survival bag out of the wind until I recovered. I always carry a survival bag with me since that day.. yet I seldom see it mentioned in lists of essential safety gear ?.

In that particular incident we had VHF .. flares .. you name it ..but the two guys I was with..luckily for me ..both doctors ..agreed that if I was relying on outside help coming..I would possibly not be here writing this. The kayakers were club trained and regularly self rescued.

I was not able to roll the kayak despite my experience .. I foolishly took the attitude..I know what Im doing ..I will never fall in !!

Most folks cant afford everything when they start..but some things cost very little .. the survival bag was nothing more than a large plastic bag ..cost around £5 and takes up no space at all. A lidl drybag for dry clothes is a few quid too. Its not needed on lovely warm summer days ..but could save a life on a cold windy day.

Fortunately I have only needed it the once ………...
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Old 03 March 2019, 10:40   #75
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I ve got survival bags 40 years old and carried space blankets and chemical warmers too as you say Donny for less than £20 will save your life.
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Old 03 March 2019, 12:20   #76
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I carry survival bags too. A fast ride on a rib when wet is not nice. If you are a diver you will have experience of this when your suit leaked etc. It’s just discomfort when in dive kit wet through in clothes those bags will save lives
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Old 03 March 2019, 13:03   #77
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Good to hear that guys.

I should add that I was only in the sea for seven minutes ..but the coastline was remote...the nearest town and professional help was a ferry trip away.


Because we were prepared for emergency situations ..after half an hour of me collapsing on the beach then being warmed in the survival bag ..I watched the kayakers tow my boat back to Largs and I walked round and got the ferry back to my car ..then drove home.

A cold day in 2005 where the tide almost took me away

I guess you all know sea temperatures in December in Scotland are warmer than in April when the main boating season begins !!







Even a slip on seaweed while launching a boat can have you soaking wet ..and if you have no where to go ..at this time of year it can be fatal if you cant get out the wind and into dry clothes.

I prefer being very independent and carry an aux OB.. spare prop etc. I have never once sent a pan pan or Mayday call although I have had assistance from a couple friends at times. Obviously I would have no hesitation sending a distress call..but being prepared has prevented that so far...and I hope that continues.

As for flares in a SIB .. I quickly ditched mine after watching Gordon Brown..the kayak instructors video where he let off his rocket flare for demonstration purposes only. The base bounced off the deck and hit him in the face .. bruising it .. his hands were also burnt.

Imagine he was in a SIB beside the fuel tank when that rogue rocket went off ?

Photo of Gordon and his rocket flare .. taken by my brother Douglas ..



I now prefer a PLB and VHF but I certainly could not afford them when I started.. I went in company of others who did have them

Just some food for though ..based on personal experience ... although perhaps I have been unlucky and experienced folk dont fall in the water ???!!!
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Old 03 March 2019, 13:34   #78
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Hmm might add a couple of survival bags to our kit... they can go in the bag with our Gurnard approved beach rollers. So we can pull out at an unexpected landing... and live to tell the tale.

Any advice on types or brands?
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Old 03 March 2019, 13:53   #79
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Cheapest Go Outdoors is £2.49 ..most expensive is £9.9.

https://www.gooutdoors.co.uk/search/...val&apelog=yes


It was a double bag that saved me that day because one of the doctors (my brother) got in beside me to help warm me up ..but possibly more important ..to breath additional carbon dioxide into the bag.

I cant remember the reason why but I do recall (because they were doctors) they knew that breathing in carbon dioxide helped folk suffering from hypothermia shock. I will try to find out the medical reason why just to ensure that is the case ..but Im certain I remember that.

My survival bag is home made from an old tent. Im a dab hand with a sewing machine. Basically its only to keep the wind off to allow the body to start heating up. I also had a flask of coffee poured down my throat ..and I enjoyed that coffee very much.

I use the bag for many uses too such as keeping dirty washing dry when Im away on long trips..but I also ensure its always to hand and always dry...so don't put the mackerel I catch in it
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Old 03 March 2019, 15:11   #80
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It was probably an attempt to make you breathe more deeply. When we breathe we create co2 as waste gas. This makes the brain tell you to breathe to equal the pressure in your system. Too much co2 means breathe basically
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