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Old 21 August 2012, 20:45   #1
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Outboard alternator to charge battery?

How come the manual for my Honda 15HP O/B clearly states that the alternator is not designed to charge a "deep-cycle" battery? I know what a deep cycle battery is. What's the difference between charging one of those, or another type of battery?

Thanks in advance for the replies
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Old 22 August 2012, 04:27   #2
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On my little 15hp Yam the powers take off is ment to just run nav lights not for charging batteries if I remember correctly!
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Old 22 August 2012, 05:05   #3
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The Output is most likley to be AC, hence NOT for battery Charging..
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Old 22 August 2012, 09:20   #4
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This is what the manual says. I'm confused:

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Old 22 August 2012, 12:05   #5
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Does that motor have a rectifier and a voltage regulator, or just a rectifier?

Many batteries don't take well to voltages higher than 14.5v or so, and a rectifier alone will hit 17 volts.
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Old 22 August 2012, 15:48   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter_C View Post
Does that motor have a rectifier and a voltage regulator, or just a rectifier?
I have no idea what that is. Sorry
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Old 22 August 2012, 17:10   #7
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Some outboards have a separate lighting or charging coil alongside the primary ignition coils inside the flywheel ,
To charge a battery you need Dc current , the coil produces Ac ok for lights so you need a Rectifier to change it to Dc if ones not fitted ( most motorcycle ones will fit )

The 2 wires that you may have coming out on your engine will run Nav lights But the faster you go the more electric the engine makes and without some sort of voltage regulater the bulbs will get brighter until they blow or if it's a battery it will over charge .
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Old 23 April 2014, 10:51   #8
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Old post but someone might need the correct answer.
Your charge controller is not buildt to load a flat battery.
The controller might overheat and burn up if connected to a totally drained battery.
In other words it's intended for like a MC- battery, not a car battery and definitly not a large deep-cycle marine battery that you drain much between charges
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Old 23 April 2014, 11:12   #9
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Thanks for the reply! Very informative, and makes sense!

Happy boating season, all! it's been a long, brutal winter!
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Old 24 April 2014, 10:10   #10
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Heh, wasn't really expecting you to be waching this still.
Anyway I should perhaps explain it a bit further.
A flat start battery dont draw much current initially when you start to charge it.
A flat deep cycle battery sucks up Amps like mad when you start to charge it.
So actually a car battery might work fine.

If concerned run the motor in 5 minute intervals and let it cool down between.
Or better yet install an Amp-meter and keep the charge below your engines maximum rating. This could probably be done by keepeing the rev's down.

At idle there should probably be no risk of damaging the regulator or coils no matter what battery you use.
Some regulators may not charge at all at idle though.
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