Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 12 August 2013, 12:34   #1
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Bristol
Make: Honwave
Length: 3m +
Engine: Mercury 15HP 2Str
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 109
Our first venture onto the waters of Bristol!

So, yesterday we took the plunge (thankfully not literally!) and took the boat and engine down to the Baltic Wharf launch in Bristol via my BMW 3 series coupe.

The boat (Honwave 3.8m x 1.7m) went perfectly into the back with the seats folded down, the engine (Mercury 15HP 2str) lay comfortably across the width of the car, at the front of the boot.

We arrived and parked at the Cottage Inn to start the inflation, it was our first ever attempt at any of this, so we were a bit apprehensive and we didn't want to invoke any laughs from the onlooking crowd at the pub, so we took our time. I carried the boat from the car myself (its about 50kg I think) and used an electric pump to inflate it, overall it took about 10 minutes or so to reach full pressure. We attached the oars and my girlfriend and I carried the boat down the launch ramp, she struggled a little but got there eventually - I really do need those wheels!!

Once partially in the water, I carried the engine down the ram (wearing wellies!) and attached it to the boat.

We then needed to mix the fuel and oil, it was a little tricky as the oil container had a guide, but it was useless - in future I'll be taking a measuring bottle of some form with me for accurate addition of oil. Strapped the fuel tank to the boat, primed the engine and fuel line, turned up the idle a little and apprehensively pulled the starter...it started FIRST TIME and sounded beautiful! We were so impressed, particularly based on my prior experience of 2 stroke engines!

We donned our buoyancy jackets, filled the boat with food and drink (into a Overboard Floatable Bag) and prepared to maneuver the boat out onto the water - it was a little tricky as a boat had broken down at the entrance, but regardless of that the exit from the ramp isn't particularly generous in size, there wasn't a chance that I would attempt to use the motor to get us out so instead one of us walked the boat around the jetty using the rope, it felt a bit lame but more practical than crashing on my first ever attempt, in front of a pub full of people

So, eventually off we went, powered up the engine and sailed away towards the waterfront area! I had only put 7lt of petrol into the tank as it was our first exploration so I was unsure of how far we could go, but we cruised around a little, explored the waters and then headed towards Netham Lock - we then went a little further but decided to turn around as it was nearing 7.30pm by that time, we'll explore further up next time!

Overall, we were on the waters for around 4hrs, still had lots of fuel left by the end and had a thoroughly amazingly fun time - I can see how this hobby is addictive, we can't wait to get out on the waters again!!

So, following on from the experience, I have a few points/queries:
  • The cost for the day was 6.80 including insurance from the Baltic Wharf launch, is there a cheaper place to launch for a day's boating in Bristol?
  • For how long could we have gone on 7lr of petrol at a 4-6 knots pace?
  • How long is it safe/practical to keep a fuel tank in a garage of mixed oil/petrol with degradation?
  • We saw lots of little pubs with moorings, but signs stating "No Mooring", does this mean that we can't stop there for 1-2 hour(s) or does it mean we can't stay there indefinitely/overnight?
  • I desperately need a set of those launch wheels - my girlfriend will get bored very quickly of helping me lift it!

Overall, we absolutely loved it - thanks to everyone on here for the information, answers and help to make this a reality!


__________________

__________________
sergeant is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 August 2013, 12:57   #2
RIBnet supporter
 
bartiny's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Accrington
Length: no boat
Join Date: Oct 2012
Posts: 451
Well done , sounds like you did just fine with it being your first launch, and with people watching

Cant comment on fuel economy but that does not seem like alot of fuel for the ammount of cruising

As you know a good set of launching wheels will make the whole experience easier and ultimately more enjoyable
__________________

__________________
bartiny is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 August 2013, 13:58   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Bristol
Boat name: loopy lou
Make: Avon Searider
Length: 5m +
Engine: Honda BF75
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 128
I can remember my first time out in Bristol docks on my own boat It was great, I still take a trip up to bath and back every now and then.

[ I have a few points/queries:
The cost for the day was 6.80 including insurance from the Baltic Wharf launch, is there a cheaper place to launch for a day's boating in Bristol? ]

A. There is no cheaper place to launch and you can only get a navigation licence from Harbour masters office I think.
Point to note. once you are past Netham lock you no longer require a Harbour navigation licence so you could launch from the river bank for free and go up to Hanam Lock

[*]We saw lots of little pubs with moorings, but signs stating "No Mooring", does this mean that we can't stop there for 1-2 hour(s) or does it mean we can't stay there indefinitely/overnight?

A. Most of the pubs and resturants do not mind you mooring as long as you are spending in there establishment, Chequers pub up through Hanham lock used to be well worth a visit

If I see you out I'll give you a wave.
__________________
teamplonker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 August 2013, 19:34   #4
RIBnet admin team
 
willk's Avatar
 
Country: Ireland
Make: Redbay Boats
Length: 9m +
Engine: 370hp
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 12,928
RIBase
Sounds like you pretty much nailed that one.

Fuel - mixed fuel is good for months - all season really. Give the can a shake before you use it again. A tip, I tend to mix my fuel in 5L batches in a can and add it to my main tank as I need it. That way, it's the same small 100ml bottle added to the 5L each time - simples, and I carry a spare oil bottle each day in case I need a top up somewhere. There are many advantages to doing it this way...

When you run your engine in a freshwater barrel to clean the internals, disconnect the fuel and allow the engine to use up the fuel in the carbs - it will take a few minutes. This will make it easier to start after prolonged lack of use.
__________________
willk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12 August 2013, 20:20   #5
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: South Coast
Make: Quicksilver
Length: 3m +
Engine: outboard
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 142
I know we have already had the oil ratio debate and were talking about 75:1, and your 15 is a lot better behaved Than mine. If your going to be doing lot of canal pottering possibly the pottering speeds your doing may not be what your two stroke is best suited to, just something to be aware of, not sure if others could give some comment here as to whether oiling up can be reduced by less oil mix or more open throttle thrashing on flushing if your not going to be able to burn off your oil. Just a thought,
__________________
Sunstreaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 August 2013, 02:06   #6
Member
 
paddlers's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Sticks, N.Yorks
Boat name: Tamanco
Make: Honwave 3.5AE
Length: 3m +
Engine: Tohatsu Outboard
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1,063
Sounds like you had a great day.
Launch wheels are a huge help & well worth the money. Do a search on here to find out what type are going to suit your needs.
I have a Mercury 15hp 2 stroke and mix at 75:1. Engine has a sticker 100:1 but the experienced users on here always go for 50:1. Never had any issues but we do like to have a blast at full throttle when we get the chance.
I ALWAYS run the engine dry by disconnecting the fuel line if it's going to stand in the shed for a week or two but never bother if we're going to use it in a day or two on holiday.
We're currently on Scotlands beautiful West Coast and having a great time. The sibs (aluminium floor) getting plenty of use for fishing and general use when the tides out & we cant get the big boat out.
Good luck & enjoy yourself
__________________
paddlers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 August 2013, 04:01   #7
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: South Coast
Make: Quicksilver
Length: 3m +
Engine: outboard
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 142
Most chandlers will have a very inexpensive small measuring jug available with set oil ratios marked on to assist with your mixing, which will save you having to use the bottle gauge if its more tricky with small quantities of fuel.
__________________
Sunstreaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 August 2013, 04:04   #8
Member
 
paddlers's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Sticks, N.Yorks
Boat name: Tamanco
Make: Honwave 3.5AE
Length: 3m +
Engine: Tohatsu Outboard
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 1,063
Bottle of Yamalube has a pretty accurate measuring system & can be topped up plus doesn't need keeping clean like a measuring jug.
__________________
paddlers is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 August 2013, 04:53   #9
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: East Anglia
Boat name: Nimrod II
Make: Aerotec 380
Length: 3m +
Engine: Suzuki DF20 EFI
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 3,276
Must admit I've always been obsessive with getting the ratio I want so measure with a accurately graduated small jug. I have the ratio written on my tanks/cans in permanent marker with the ml of oil per litre fuel so you don't have to remember.

I buy petrol 10l at a time from the pumps in a spare tank which I use to top up the main tank as needed. I have a small bottle with 10l worth of oil measured into it (134ml for 75:1)) so there is no faffing on the forecourt. Just tip this in halfway through filling the tank.
__________________
Fenlander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 13 August 2013, 06:53   #10
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: South Coast
Make: Quicksilver
Length: 3m +
Engine: outboard
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 142
It was suggested to me to stay clear of supermarket petrol and go for the high octane unleaded (the expensive one)
__________________

__________________
Sunstreaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 17:57.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.