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Old 01 December 2010, 05:43   #1
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One man launch (Zodiac Futura)

Hi there,

I'm looking to get a zodiac futura, some time in the nearish future. I would like to know what is the very largest size I could transport, set up and strip down on my own, including the outboard. I have a pick up so space shouldn't be a problem, and I don't want the stearing console or hard floor. I'm early thirties and averagely built, I wouldn't mind it being a bit of a struggle, but must be able to do it single handed.

I apologise if this is a boring, been done to death question, but I couldn't find much when I searched.

I would also be interested to know a rough estimate of set up time. I read some body on here said about 20 mins up and 20 mins down, but that seems very quick.

Appreciate the time anyone spends answering my questions.
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Old 01 December 2010, 07:04   #2
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Clarky,

I have a 48 kg engine, which I just managed to get on my transom on my own. I can lift more than 48 kg (if I have to) but engines are balanced badly for lifting, and not very good shapes for holding. I put this on the transom in the comfort of my garage, I don't know if I could manage it lifting from a pontoon down into a wobbly boat and with the risk it went in the sea if I slipped. I'm fairly sure I couldn't lift it up from the transom onto a pontoon / jetty. From what I've read here I'd say that whilst there are some stronger / better equipped / more organised people here - the general feeling is anything over 50 kg is going to be too difficult to take on and off every time you launch and recover.

How big is actually practical will depend on (a) how you launch - rollers, trailer, or slide in the water then put engine on (b) how far from the car to the water (c) the road/surface quality / steepness you are crossing.

If you are searching, "singlehanded" might be better than "one man" - or maybe not!
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Old 01 December 2010, 07:21   #3
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I see you're at Phuket.

Well you have many possibilities:
- Get a trolley in the Internet and a garage and have everything ready to launch.
- Beach launching with launching roller - get it in the Internet.
- For managing the engine, if you have a pickup, get a pickup davits on the Internet. Get an outboard trolley in the Internet to service your engine.
- Of course, you will need an electric pump - get it in the Internet.
- Do not look in the Internet!!! Get some 2-3 natives there to help you for a few dollars!!!
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Old 01 December 2010, 08:22   #4
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Thank you very much for you quick replies. In case you hadn't realised, I will be a total newbie to boating, but love to throw myself in at the deep end so to speak, safely of course.

So would I be right in thinking 50kg is about a 20HP? There seems to be quite a jump up to 70kg for 25HP. I think it was Honda I was looking at.

To be honest, the whole appeal of a SIB for me,is the folding it up and transporting it with out a trailer, I'm not to bothered if it's a bit time consuming. I have space (just) for a boat on a trailer, but if I was going down that route I probably wouldn't choose a SIB in the first place. It would seem I'm in the minority on that though.

I can get within 20 metres of the beach, so I guess I was hoping to drag it down on a dolly maybe with those special beach wheels. Is it not an option to take the motor down to the water on a trolley and mount it there? That way splitting the weight in to two trips?

How about the boat. Would I be able to manage anything bigger than the smallest 3.7m?

Still 3.7m with 20 HP will be more than adequate to take me around the coast to do a bit of fishing and snorkling.

Thanks for your time, appreciated. I won't lie to you though, I'm in the very early stages of this, it's not going to happen over night, so don't waist too much time answering my questions. I just need to get over the first hurdle of what size boat and motor, so I'm ready to go when the time comes.

EDIT: Just realised there's only a 3kg difference in weight between the 3.7 and 4.1 so I suppose either would be an option??
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Old 01 December 2010, 10:46   #5
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I can't really comment on the size/weight of the boat, other than to say 20HP will be plenty for 3.7m (and fine for 4.1m). For one or 2 people 3.7m is probably more than adequate. Bear in mind if you are on your own, with you tiller steering at the back and the weight of the engine you will be quite stern heavy - you might be better with a 3.1m ish boat?

In terms of engine size it depends if you are talking about 2 stroke or 4 stroke. All Honda's are 4 stroke. 4 stroke are usually heavier for a given HP rating. (Small, e.g. 20 HP ish) 2 stroke are generally not availble new in Europe and the US any more because of environmentla restrictions. I'm not sure if that is the case for you? If you can still get them, or are looking second hand you'd get a 25 HP Yamaha for just < 50 kg.

BUT if you can I would strongly encourage you to try lifting this (if at all possible onto a boat) as it won't be easy.

Personally I'd be looking for something lighter - maybe 15 HP 2 stroke, which would push a lightly loaded 3.7m boat OK and a 3.1 very nicely. The "ideal" engine, is possibly the Tohatsu 18HP 2 stroke if you can still get hold of them? - maximum power to weight ratio. Very light for lifting on and off etc...
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Old 01 December 2010, 11:55   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polwart View Post
I can't really comment on the size/weight of the boat, other than to say 20HP will be plenty for 3.7m (and fine for 4.1m). For one or 2 people 3.7m is probably more than adequate. Bear in mind if you are on your own, with you tiller steering at the back and the weight of the engine you will be quite stern heavy - you might be better with a 3.1m ish boat?

In terms of engine size it depends if you are talking about 2 stroke or 4 stroke. All Honda's are 4 stroke. 4 stroke are usually heavier for a given HP rating. (Small, e.g. 20 HP ish) 2 stroke are generally not availble new in Europe and the US any more because of environmentla restrictions. I'm not sure if that is the case for you? If you can still get them, or are looking second hand you'd get a 25 HP Yamaha for just < 50 kg.

BUT if you can I would strongly encourage you to try lifting this (if at all possible onto a boat) as it won't be easy.

Personally I'd be looking for something lighter - maybe 15 HP 2 stroke, which would push a lightly loaded 3.7m boat OK and a 3.1 very nicely. The "ideal" engine, is possibly the Tohatsu 18HP 2 stroke if you can still get hold of them? - maximum power to weight ratio. Very light for lifting on and off etc...
Not only weight but load balance. 4strokes head is heavier than tail, so it's more complicated to handle than 2strokes.
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Old 01 December 2010, 12:14   #7
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Thanks for the continued advice. I could tell this forum was very noob friendly, just after a couple of hours browsing. Makes a nice change.

Certainly lots to think about. Will keep on reading.
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Old 01 December 2010, 21:00   #8
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I started that way. Had a 9.9 given to me. Bought a MkIIc to go with it. Too slow. Got a 20, which I upped to 25 hp. No problem lifting it on and off at home, but too much hassle to inflate/deflate; mount dismount motor each time I wanted to use it. Ended up building a trailer.
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Old 02 December 2010, 11:10   #9
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When I bought my mk2 futura I had intentions to roll it up and carry it on excursions to Mexico. It really was a pain to pack up and all the gear took up more space than I anticipated. It didn't take too long with help, but by myself it was at least an hour (the hard floor is easy). You dont want to roll it up wet or dirty. So figure on using a tarp, towel dry the boat off and let it stand inflated while you deal with everything else. I use the old river rafting trick and prop up the hull with my two paddles. If you are in salt water you will need to do a fresh water wash at some point. Twenty minutes to pack? Certainly not by yourself with my boat!

I'm glad my deal came with a trailer! I definitely use it more frequently than I would otherwise and now I can cruise with the bigger outboard all of the time.

Ribs and hard hulled boats have their advantages, but a sib on a trailer still has a lot of benefits. The ridiculously light combined weight doesn't require a bigger vehicle to tow, no heavyweight would make it down the four wheel drive trails we travel on and I could never successfully beach launch over round rocks or just using my 30 ft tow strap in estuaries.

The ability to pack up your inflatable can make it possible to have a boat, which is always better than no boat. As everyone pointed out loading and unloading the outboard with the boat on the water is very problematic. A roller, wheels or anything to facilitate a dry motor mount situation before launching is definitely the way to go (though I always had help). If you can swing the storage space at all, get a trailer.

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Old 03 December 2010, 08:59   #10
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If mounting/dismounting, I would go for a 3-3.5 m, high pressure floor, and a 10HP fourstroke. Of course, Bravo electric pump, foldable engine trolley (such as Rooteq), and another foldable trolley for the packed boat. Launching at sand beach with launching inflatable roller. All of that fits in a pickup and is light enough to handle on your own.
And fun for 2 people, even 3.
Take a look at Honwave-Honda packs or similar from Yam-Yamaha, Suzumar-Suzuki, etc.

And my best advice: first choose the engine, then the boat.
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