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Old 29 June 2012, 18:34   #21
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Boat name: Lencraft 4.8m
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don't go too mad with the tube pressure if there are no pressure relief valves and hot sun involved (as I imagine there will be in your location). Sunshine is in very short supply here at the minute! Heading to NYC and Maine in the morning though!
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Old 30 June 2012, 02:10   #22
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Although I am not an expert for setting up a SIB trailer, I can tell you mine is set up differently. The bunks are horizontal and mounted completely under the transom, not under the tubes. I would say it should be one or the other, but not both and especially at an angle. They are pretty tough little boats though and it probably won't damage it at all. The bunks sticking out the back looks good and about the same as mine. My boat also rests on my fenders, when it is deflated. Once properly inflated it rises off of them. I just rebuilt my trailer bunk stanchions, and could have easily raised it higher, but I choose not to in order to make launch and recovery easier since the trailer does not have to go as deep in the water.

The bow roller on mine sits lower and comes out under the bow handle. Therefore I do run my winch (If I ever called my woman a wench...oh boy) strap over the bow roller. Both my rollers are also flatter allowing a larger contact area. I do clip the winch line off to the bow handle *shrugs*, but I won't anchor my boat that way, and instead anchor it off the d-rings along the sides run through the front handle.

You already said you have them, but I am a firm believer in transom tie downs. After watching my Nautique bounce off the trailer when I was only towing it a mile, I vowed to never do it again.

I would highly recommend checking your trailer lug nuts within 50 miles or less of home. They do come loose and it is better to take a few minutes and check them, then wind up with a problem. A spare tire is a must have with single axle trailers, and if put forward on the tongue would add some weight too. Make sure your jack and lug wrench fit the trailer.

Have fun! and looking forward to your outing report
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Old 30 June 2012, 08:13   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Peter_C
Although I am not an expert for setting up a SIB trailer, I can tell you mine is set up differently. The bunks are horizontal and mounted completely under the transom, not under the tubes. I would say it should be one or the other, but not both and especially at an angle. They are pretty tough little boats though and it probably won't damage it at all. The bunks sticking out the back looks good and about the same as mine. My boat also rests on my fenders, when it is deflated. Once properly inflated it rises off of them. I just rebuilt my trailer bunk stanchions, and could have easily raised it higher, but I choose not to in order to make launch and recovery easier since the trailer does not have to go as deep in the water.

The bow roller on mine sits lower and comes out under the bow handle. Therefore I do run my winch (If I ever called my woman a wench...oh boy) strap over the bow roller. Both my rollers are also flatter allowing a larger contact area. I do clip the winch line off to the bow handle *shrugs*, but I won't anchor my boat that way, and instead anchor it off the d-rings along the sides run through the front handle.

You already said you have them, but I am a firm believer in transom tie downs. After watching my Nautique bounce off the trailer when I was only towing it a mile, I vowed to never do it again.

I would highly recommend checking your trailer lug nuts within 50 miles or less of home. They do come loose and it is better to take a few minutes and check them, then wind up with a problem. A spare tire is a must have with single axle trailers, and if put forward on the tongue would add some weight too. Make sure your jack and lug wrench fit the trailer.

Have fun! and looking forward to your outing report
Such a good tip, spotting where the things have shifted after about half an hour. Our whole boat cover started to rip where the wind caught it going down the m27, luckily had a sail needle and waxed thread but it probably would have ripped all the way across if we hadnt checked...

For every horror story remember there are hundreds of perfect trips with no hassle, dont be put off!!!
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Old 30 June 2012, 13:57   #24
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I should have clarified, the trailer lugs need to be checked more when the trailer is new. I did have a wheel on my Harbor Freight trailer come loose within about 100 miles of new, and they were torqued using an accurate torque wrench. Seems like there is a break in period with cheap trailer wheels.
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