Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 26 September 2018, 18:40   #1
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Sammamish
Make: Zodiac
Length: 6m +
Engine: Yahama F40
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 2
How to get Zodiac Futura MK II HD to plane with 40hp outboard

Hi

I am new to inflatable and just purchased a Zodiac Futura MKII HD with Yahama F40 outboard. The first time I ran it in a lake, I was gradually increasing throttle but at around 20%, the bow tilt up so much that I thought it might flop over. I had the motor trim down to the lowest point.
I contacted the dealer. He told me I need to increase throttle more and bit more faster to get over the hump so the boat's bow will drop and plane. So how fast and how much should I increase the throttle? Is flipping really a concern if I trim motor down to the lowest point? Any experience to share with a first time boater here?

Thanks
__________________

__________________
kennthhz is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 26 September 2018, 19:11   #2
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: California
Make: zodiac futura
Length: 4m +
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 183
First put weight up front. Gas can or a fat buddy. If your boat is setup light and your alone you move forward as much as you can and hit the throttle.
On my mk2 futura I have seats mounted just back behind the center line. A 12 gal gas can behind. When I hit the throttle I hit it hard and then pull back once I get to the speed I want. The only time bow rise is a problem is if Iím going into the wind and it catches the bow.
When my seats were further back bow rise was a huge problem. But my boat has seats, storage box under them, 12 gallons of gas and spare prop, anchor and tools. A light boat will launch with a 40hp once balanced.
Once I get going fast I prefer trim being moved up till I start ventilating the prop then back down a touch. I have hydraulic trim. With trim up it softens the ride a bit but as much the center keel front lifts out and itís feels more stable.
You will need to find the sweet spot perhaps second hole.
__________________

__________________
pagick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27 September 2018, 07:59   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Lincolnshire
Boat name: Mousetrap
Make: Zodiac Cadet 310S
Length: 3m +
Engine: Mariner 4 stroke 9.9
Join Date: Sep 2014
Posts: 341
If your motor is trimmed to the lowest position, it is more likely to try to bury the nose than flip it.

The reason the bow is rising is that planing is when the boat climbs over its own bow wave and skims across the surface of the water. The steepest bit is as the boat is half way up its bow wave. Think of it as climbing out of a hole: you need to get up and over that bow wave then you can ease the throttle and sit comfortably on the plane.

At the moment, you're like a person pulling a Bandaid off his hairy arm slowly and stopping when it starts to hurt. The trick is to pull the Bandaid off quickly. The same with getting onto the plane. Not "as fast as absolutely possible" but "quickly and purposefully" because half way up is the worst position of all.

It's important to have the nose of the boat weighed down, especially if you're going into big waves or a strong headwind. The helmsman should sit as far forward as possible whilst being still in control. Crew members should sit forward. Have the anchor and safety stowed securely in the bow.

Within common sense limits, weight distribution is less crucial once you're up on the plane.
__________________
My novel, "Bridge of Otherwhere" 2018 by Michael Wilkinson, now available for download on Kindle.TinyURL.com/Bridge-of-Otherwhere
Mikefule is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27 September 2018, 13:28   #4
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: California
Make: zodiac futura
Length: 4m +
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikefule View Post
If your motor is trimmed to the lowest position, it is more likely to try to bury the nose than flip it.

The reason the bow is rising is that planing is when the boat climbs over its own bow wave and skims across the surface of the water. The steepest bit is as the boat is half way up its bow wave. Think of it as climbing out of a hole: you need to get up and over that bow wave then you can ease the throttle and sit comfortably on the plane.

At the moment, you're like a person pulling a Bandaid off his hairy arm slowly and stopping when it starts to hurt. The trick is to pull the Bandaid off quickly. The same with getting onto the plane. Not "as fast as absolutely possible" but "quickly and purposefully" because half way up is the worst position of all.

It's important to have the nose of the boat weighed down, especially if you're going into big waves or a strong headwind. The helmsman should sit as far forward as possible whilst being still in control. Crew members should sit forward. Have the anchor and safety stowed securely in the bow.

Within common sense limits, weight distribution is less crucial once you're up on the plane.
What Mikefule says is correct with one difference the Futura hull design has.
When at speed it can feel like the boat is skating on three points. By this I mean it runs on the two speed tubes that keep the boat from being able to slide around. And if there is a little too much weight up front it can feel like the keel's front portion cuts into the water and steering can become very responsive, even unexpectedly acute. Like a Thundercat inflatable where they move forward to dig in the leading edge of the inside tube and then the back pivots on that point. The thundercat comparison is an exaggeration to what a futura hull does but once on plane I like to lift the bow a bit so I don't have to grip my steering so hard all the time. And if I wanted to turn faster I would lower the bow. These effects you only feel when at higher speeds. If you compare the center keel of the futura to any other sport boat inflatable the Futura's keel is the largest right where it hits the water at the front then tapers down faster than single keel boats. This is what lets the speed tubes be the dominate running surface on the back half of the boat.
My first inflatable in the 1980's with a single keel did not do this to my memory.
For you the problem is solved by moving yourself/others forward then back like Mikefule stated so well.
__________________
pagick is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 27 September 2018, 15:32   #5
Member
 
maverick58's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Length: 4m +
Join Date: Jul 2018
Posts: 41
Get a tiller extension!!!
__________________
maverick58 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 28 September 2018, 15:34   #6
Member
 
Country: USA
Town: Sammamish
Make: Zodiac
Length: 6m +
Engine: Yahama F40
Join Date: Sep 2018
Posts: 2
Thanks for the awesome tips guys!
__________________

__________________
kennthhz is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
outboard, zodiac

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:34.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
×