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Old 12 October 2018, 02:50   #1
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How far do you push your sib?

Morning lads and ladies,

How far into deep seas do people go? Would the sibs be capable for the rough waters further from the coast line? Videos always help!
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Old 12 October 2018, 02:57   #2
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Well you only need to search The Gurnards adventures for longer trips.

Such as this one... A Taste of Jura
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Old 12 October 2018, 05:16   #3
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50-60 miles not uncommon coastal cruising in a day
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Old 12 October 2018, 10:58   #4
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Morning lads and ladies,

How far into deep seas do people go? Would the sibs be capable for the rough waters further from the coast line? Videos always help!
Monsieur Bombard took one across the Atlantic!
Did alright out of it too!
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Old 12 October 2018, 11:43   #5
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The sib isn’t the weak link unless it’s starting to have glue problems. So I would not go farther than the other boats I would flag down to tow me back if i have engine trouble.
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Old 13 October 2018, 07:18   #6
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A sensibly driven SIB will cope with a hell of a lot. It's not so much the size of the waves as the type of waves. Get caught in a breaking wave, especially sideways on, and you're in difficulty.

In many ways, the most dangerous bit is near the shore, where the waves pile up and break, and doubly so if the waves are reflecting back out from something like a harbour wall or breakwater. Where 2 waves cross, the heights of the crests are added.

A strong headwind is an issue too: go too fast into the wind, let the wind catch under your bow as you go off the top of a wave and you can flip.

But on a day of fairly big rolling waves, you can be out there perfectly safely as long as you're sensible and have a plan for getting ashore safely.
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Old 13 October 2018, 13:10   #7
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A sensibly driven SIB will cope with a hell of a lot. It's not so much the size of the waves as the type of waves. Get caught in a breaking wave, especially sideways on, and you're in difficulty.

In many ways, the most dangerous bit is near the shore, where the waves pile up and break, and doubly so if the waves are reflecting back out from something like a harbour wall or breakwater. Where 2 waves cross, the heights of the crests are added.

A strong headwind is an issue too: go too fast into the wind, let the wind catch under your bow as you go off the top of a wave and you can flip.

But on a day of fairly big rolling waves, you can be out there perfectly safely as long as you're sensible and have a plan for getting ashore safely.
Good advice..
I did many miles in my old Zodiac and 20 hp merc... and seldom felt threatened even when it cut up.
The head wind bit is spot on...especially if your steering from a tiller with most of the weight on the stern...mind you it can happen climbing really STEEP Waves in REALY strong HEAD winds even in heavy deep V RIB!
Not a nice feeling..
I'd also add the experience and Hardiness of the Crew is a really BIG factor on deciding what is safe and prudent to do!...plus in a SIB weight distibution of passengers and securing kit/ fuel ect securly I.e balancing the craft PROPERLY (especially in the Chop) is paramount...for good handling/making a safe passage.
Those who saw the "Irish suicide Jockeys" going right round Anglsey in quite a mixed rolling chop with some roughish sections wearing their swimming goggles and hanging on for dear life in a sub 4m!..a few seasons back will know what I'm talking about!...
They not only stayed the course but put a few ...in much larger craft to Shame!.. Even if they did have a boat 1/2 filled with water most of the way...did take considerably longer... and reached the end wetter than bucket of Eels
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