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Old 20 May 2014, 14:12   #1
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Honwave aluminuim sandwich

Hi all.

Could anyone tell me if the floor on a Honwave is sandwitched between wood or not.
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Old 20 May 2014, 15:05   #2
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The alloy floor on my T 40 was just a honey combe layer of alloy no wood involved
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Old 20 May 2014, 15:10   #3
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The alloy floor on my T 40 was just a honey combe layer of alloy no wood involved
Much appreciated peace of info as I need a bit of welding done thanks.
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Old 21 May 2014, 03:40   #4
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No wood inside alu plates.

Need welding? Related post:
Honwave T40 alu floor plate broken

By the way, last summer I got the same problem again (in different places, as I placed the stringers in the alternate position). Once again, MIG welding.
I'm considering to interchange plates 2 and 3 as they seem to be identical (except for the petrol tank tie down straps, which I do not use as I keep mine tied down to the bow wooden plate).
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Old 21 May 2014, 05:13   #5
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No wood inside alu plates.

Need welding? Related post:
Honwave T40 alu floor plate broken

By the way, last summer I got the same problem again (in different places, as I placed the stringers in the alternate position). Once again, MIG welding.
I'm considering to interchange plates 2 and 3 as they seem to be identical (except for the petrol tank tie down straps, which I do not use as I keep mine tied down to the bow wooden plate).
My floor is the has cracked right where it's been riveted on the underside im thinking this may be a design fault, or under inflation at some piont as my boat is second hand and having had the crack in when bought so a little unsure.I will be geting it TIG welded but was thinking of getting them to weld a strp of aluminium down both sides may be 6 to 8 inchs, also see see if it would be possible to weld the two stringers together and just eliminate that join.As for changing the floor around that sounds a good idea as the rivets would be not be the weak point.What sort of money did you pay for weiding? Also have you had problems since welding it,Many thanks for all input.
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Old 21 May 2014, 05:51   #6
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MIG welding is not cheap. I paid 50 or 60 euros, I do not remember, maybe more.

Welding a strip of aluminum may not be cheap neither useful.
Aluminum is very soft, it only get hard when profiled (such as paper is soft but cardboard is hard).
Welding stringers together is not trivial, you may not get the proper shape so it may not fit...and even though, you get the same problem: welding profiled stringers can easiliy break. But I would bet stringers are iron, not aluminum.
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Old 21 May 2014, 07:17   #7
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MIG welding is not cheap. I paid 50 or 60 euros, I do not remember, maybe more.

Welding a strip of aluminum may not be cheap neither useful.
Aluminum is very soft, it only get hard when profiled (such as paper is soft but cardboard is hard).
Welding stringers together is not trivial, you may not get the proper shape so it may not fit...and even though, you get the same problem: welding profiled stringers can easiliy break. But I would bet stringers are iron, not aluminum.
It is aluminium so it is T I G welded and was told no more than 50 which is a lot cheaper than 120 for new panel.The stringer is aluminium, so will have to waite and what the engineer says when seen.
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Old 21 May 2014, 08:38   #8
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Dave, where can you purchase a brand new panel? Not for you but for me.

This is the second time I have to get that panel welded (in different places). And my boat has been used just 4 summertimes. I even got punctured the float with the broken edges (easy self repaired).

I even thought of making myself a marine plywood panel, or get full long side joiners to avoid the joint in the cracking point.
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Old 21 May 2014, 09:28   #9
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Dave, where can you purchase a brand new panel? Not for you but for me.

This is the second time I have to get that panel welded (in different places). And my boat has been used just 4 summertimes. I even got punctured the float with the broken edges (easy self repaired).

I even thought of making myself a marine plywood panel, or get full long side joiners to avoid the joint in the cracking point.
Here is the number Portishead near Bristol 01275815910 now you have said it's happened a couple of times I may just get a NEW panel, also get a 2 metre double thickness peace of oak or similar hard wood and get my chippy friend to make me 2 single stringers no joins to flex then other than that like the boat.Also may be take the rivets out,and put nut and bolt with round dome head nuts as these work loose.May be this us where the problem lie, THE RIVETS LOOSENING.

I AWAITE MORE REPLIES AS KNOWLEDGE IS KEY !!!!!!
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Old 21 May 2014, 11:57   #10
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Its actually fairly difficult to weld USED aluminum. The salt gets into the metal ever so slightly and contaminates the welds. To be done right it needs to be welded and then ground away several times and rewelded. The heating of the surrounding metal during the initial welds drives off the contaminants so that eventually you can get a solid weld. If you aren't going to someone experienced in welding aluminum which has been in salt water/marine use you won't get solid welds.
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