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Old 07 September 2013, 17:13   #31
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A massive monster of a rib to put it all in.
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Old 18 September 2013, 19:02   #32
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for tools
vise grip and a wrench to take off the prop nut
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Old 19 September 2013, 11:28   #33
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for tools
vise grip and a wrench to take off the prop nut
You'll also need a piece of 2x4 or similar to block the prop so you can get the nut off/on. Needle-nose pliers for the cotter pin. Spare prop mounting kit (washers, spacers, nut and pin[s]) for when you drop all the parts in the water.

jky
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Old 23 September 2013, 06:20   #34
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Yep I have the same, RYA lamenated card on deck with my personal details step by step instructions for anyone not used to boating on how to log a mayday.
My handhelp water proof VHF is tied to a small buoy, white&red, which remarks it and helps floating.
I sticked to the small buoy a set of very brief instructions, paper plastic covered.
To test the whole, I asked my 10 years old son what would he do with that in case of emergency. He did it without more explanations.
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Old 23 September 2013, 08:17   #35
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In an emergency sticking 100% to the correct mayday procedure isn't vital, providing you are not too far off the shore and there are other boats around, as long as you can get the word "mayday", a good description of your boat and the nature of your emergency / the help you need out then you're very likely to get help quickly.
No No No

Where is your reference to "position" and "pax on board"

If you want to encourage people to disregard the standard protocol for one of the most important transmission they may ever made then make sure you give them the correct advice.

The important elements of a Mayday call are:

MAYDAY MAYDAY MAYDAY
THIS IS............................................... (Ship's name or callsign 3 times)
MAYDAY followed by ship's name or callsign
POSITION.......................................... ..................................................
NATURE OF DISTRESS.......................................... ............................
AID REQUIRED.......................................... ..............................
NUMBER OF PERSONS ON BOARD and ANY USEFUL INFORMATION....................................... ...............................
OVER

Have you ever heard a real life incorrect Mayday - then like some other RIBnetters you would understand what I am talking about.

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Old 24 September 2013, 18:27   #36
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I have listened to that Estonias mayday call a few times yes. I am not saying that mayday calls are a joke and you should conduct them however you like. The procedure is there for a reason I am well aware of.

The point I am trying to make is that in an emergency, one of your passengers who has never even been to sea before is operating the VHF and you are unconscious, you can't expect them to recite a word-for-word perfect mayday call. What if your cute little laminated card flies overboard during your accident?

What I'm saying that if the worst comes to the worst, providing you're not miles out to sea, getting a basic message out on 16 that contains the word "mayday" and has a decent description of your boat, providing there are other boats in close proximity you have a good chance of receiving assistant quickly.

Obviously, being able to give a good location would be a huge help. But again, expecting your passenger to provide latitude and longitude in an emergency is unrealistic. People who have had very little time on the water probably won't know where they are if you are away from roads that they drive on regularly.

If a mayday call comes through with someone just screaming "HELLO HELP MY NAME IS JENNY I'M ON A BOAT WE'VE HAD AN ACCIDENT AND OUR SKIPPER IS IN THE WATER UNCONSCIOUS" then I imaging "what is your location?" and "how many people are onboard/overboard?" would be fairly high on the list of thinks which the responding coast guard would ask first.

I would never take passengers out to sea unless they were well trained, when taking out friends with little or no experience of boating then Plymouth Sound is the ideal playground as there are always loads of boats around, even without VHF you'd not be waiting long for help if you got in trouble.
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Old 24 September 2013, 20:36   #37
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^ I would think the easiest is to teach them to push the little red button, which calls for help and sends out the location. At least that is what I teach folks on my boat, and my hand held has DSC too.
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Old 25 September 2013, 01:12   #38
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I think tehguy's point was a wrong call in a real life and death emergency is better than none.

Personally, I agree.

jky
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Old 25 September 2013, 04:03   #39
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A massive monster of a rib to put it all in.

with a huge engine and some extra storage space and dont forget no auxiliary so it will be rowed back to shore.
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Old 25 September 2013, 08:41   #40
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^ I would think the easiest is to teach them to push the little red button, which calls for help and sends out the location. At least that is what I teach folks on my boat, and my hand held has DSC too.
Distress VHF radios are causing much more noise than expected. People loves buttons.
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