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Old 04 September 2013, 17:33   #21
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Bucket or similar for bailing, paddles or oars in case motor dies and you need to keep off rocks or whatever, few bottles of water and some energy bars. A good knife comes in handy for prop entanglement or if you need to cut a tow or anchor loose in a hurry.

There's about a million things that will come in handy at one time or another. Hard part is deciding which to carry and which to leave out.

jky
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Old 05 September 2013, 03:21   #22
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Country: UK - England
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Originally Posted by Wibs View Post
As above..+

Manual bailer
25m spare rope
Throwing rope
I also have laminated,in a dry accessible place, the correct Mayday procedure word for word for my rib.(just in case)
In an emergency sticking 100% to the correct mayday procedure isn't vital, providing you are not too far off the shore and there are other boats around, as long as you can get the word "mayday", a good description of your boat and the nature of your emergency / the help you need out then you're very likely to get help quickly.

The items that always stay in my SIB whenever it goes out are:

handheld VHF (at least one)
handheld GPS
powerful battery powered torch (at least one, we have no nav lights)
plenty of spare line
folding knife (at least two)
kill cord
spare buoyancy aid and waterproof jacket (in case we inherit another passenger whilst at sea)
anchor and chain

For the sort of distances we stray from the coast I think that's a perfectly adequate kit. If we were planning to venture further out then I'd certainly invest in some charts, flares etc. But if you're just having fun a few nautical miles from the harbour then you don't need to go out like you're preparing for a channel crossing, there's plenty of boats always around Plymouth sound and even in the middle of the night a quick shout on the VHF would have assistance on hand in a matter of minutes.

Don't forget dry bags for your mobile phones / wallets etc.

Whenever taking out friends on my SIB once we are in the boat and before we get under way I teach them basic procedures if something were to happen to me, for example if I am ejected from the boat how to restart the engine, basic operation of the VHF and how to call for help, how to use the manual inflater on lifejacket etc. Also you should expect none of your non-boating friends to have their own lifejackets, so make sure you have a few spare.
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Old 05 September 2013, 11:12   #23
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Originally Posted by prairie tuber View Post
Here is what I carry, which is specifically designed with whitewater rafting in mind. I believe it by far the best and safest design out there for emergency use with inflatable boats. Strap the the sheath to the front of the PFD.

CRKT Bear Claw Knife at nrs.com
I was rather disappointed in how this knife stood up to seawater (short version: it doesn't.)

I do like the design though; wish they'd use a more corrosion resistant stainless alloy.

jky
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Old 05 September 2013, 11:56   #24
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Originally Posted by tehguy View Post
In an emergency sticking 100% to the correct mayday procedure isn't vital, providing you are not too far off the shore and there are other boats around, as long as you can get the word "mayday", a good description of your boat and the nature of your emergency / the help you need out then you're very likely to get help quickly.
Yep....clear to myself, but if I'm unconscious, in the sea, and 500m away from my boat....do my crew (untrained in VHF) know of this procedure.?

A quick briefing as they board, makes me feel at ease.
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Old 05 September 2013, 12:05   #25
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Yep I have the same, RYA lamenated card on deck with my personal details step by step instructions for anyone not used to boating on how to log a mayday.
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Old 06 September 2013, 20:12   #26
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Originally Posted by tehguy View Post

In an emergency sticking 100% to the correct mayday procedure isn't vital, providing you are not too far off the shore and there are other boats around, as long as you can get the word "mayday", a good description of your boat and the nature of your emergency / the help you need out then you're very likely to get help quickly.

The items that always stay in my SIB whenever it goes out are:

handheld VHF (at least one)
handheld GPS
powerful battery powered torch (at least one, we have no nav lights)
plenty of spare line
folding knife (at least two)
kill cord
spare buoyancy aid and waterproof jacket (in case we inherit another passenger whilst at sea)
anchor and chain

For the sort of distances we stray from the coast I think that's a perfectly adequate kit. If we were planning to venture further out then I'd certainly invest in some charts, flares etc. But if you're just having fun a few nautical miles from the harbour then you don't need to go out like you're preparing for a channel crossing, there's plenty of boats always around Plymouth sound and even in the middle of the night a quick shout on the VHF would have assistance on hand in a matter of minutes.

Don't forget dry bags for your mobile phones / wallets etc.

Whenever taking out friends on my SIB once we are in the boat and before we get under way I teach them basic procedures if something were to happen to me, for example if I am ejected from the boat how to restart the engine, basic operation of the VHF and how to call for help, how to use the manual inflater on lifejacket etc. Also you should expect none of your non-boating friends to have their own lifejackets, so make sure you have a few spare.
Good words.... Do any of you carry foil blankets etc ? In case of "unexpected guests". At a couple of quid each and minimum storage requirement I think it is worth keeping some near by (i keep one in the pocket of my buoyancy aid.... )
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Old 07 September 2013, 01:56   #27
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Originally Posted by tumnus View Post

Good words.... Do any of you carry foil blankets etc ? In case of "unexpected guests". At a couple of quid each and minimum storage requirement I think it is worth keeping some near by (i keep one in the pocket of my buoyancy aid.... )
Better than nothing
Though in a boat in reality they do blow & flap about if there's any wind or breeze
unless its a large one that can be wrapped right around a person & you can get them out of the wind on the floor or under the spray dodger
in some cases they can make a wet/ cold person worse by constantly moving about trying to keep it wrapped around themselves ,
ones with tapes that can be tied around a person are better or ( you could always use some gaffer /insulation tape from the tool kit )
or one of the proper (large sack type / survival bags .

In a lost m.o.b situation carrying one in a life jacket pocket could always be streamed out to help aid detection ,
Some Metallic or foil ones may even show up on radar so if your broken down or caught out in thick fog you could always fly it like a flag from an oar as makeshift radar reflector .
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Old 07 September 2013, 02:52   #28
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Originally Posted by tehguy View Post
In an emergency sticking 100% to the correct mayday procedure isn't vital, providing you are not too far off the shore and there are other boats around, as long as you can get the word "mayday", a good description of your boat and the nature of your emergency / the help you need out then you're very likely to get help quickly.
But despite having time to think about what you posted and not being in a boat with some serious s**t happening you didn't think to mention you possition? Possition has to be the single most important factor to getting help!!

In addtion every part of the standard script is there for a reason. POB - so if you sink they know how many survivors they are searching for. If you read MustRib's accoutns of his little dunking off Milford Haven on the way to the Round Ireland he had no comms and so was left with only a PLB to get help, so when the helicopter arrived they didn't know if they were just looking for him or other survivors. Had he been unconscious how long would they have been able to search for others before running to hospital? A prefiled passage plan might help answer that but for a small rib just playing about outside a harbour I doubt many are filling passage plans with the CG.

Having a script with the radio doesn't seem to crazy and even less crazy when you think that an untrained user might need to make the call to save me...
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Old 07 September 2013, 03:00   #29
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RIBase
Front locker;
Anchor and chain / rope - permanently attached
Drogue
collapsible bucket
Couple bottles water

Console
Hand held vhf
Flares in BDH container
Sapre kill cord, fog horn, multi tool inc axe (don't ask) also in container
Large knife
Towing bridle and boat end bridle
Light sticks
Tea towel

Extinguisher on A frame

Multi tool on lifejacket and primary hand held vhf attached to me
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Old 07 September 2013, 17:04   #30
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Fire extinguisher

###Whoops, sorry for the duplicate. Missed that on page 2###
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