Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
 
Old 08 March 2008, 16:39   #1
Member
 
andreworiordan's Avatar
 
Country: Ireland
Boat name: Ocean Escapes
Make: Excalibur
Length: 9m +
Engine: 150Yamaha&300Verado
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 223
D-Class Lifeboat

Does anyone know why the driver sits on the Right? every picture i have seen of the D-Class the guy driving is always on the Right. Why is this?? I have a similar size boat and engine but i always sit on the left on the sponsons...
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	d-499.jpg
Views:	532
Size:	151.1 KB
ID:	33360  
__________________

__________________
Andrew O'Riordan
andreworiordan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 March 2008, 16:46   #2
Member
 
Country: Other
Town: Oakley
Boat name: Zerstörer
Make: Ribcraft
Length: 5m +
Engine: Suzuki DF 140
MMSI: 235050131
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 3,931
Okay,

First stab at making an idiot of myself.

I'm guessing but maybe because he can hold on with his right hand better if it gets rough.

There is probably a technical explanation. Possibly to counter the natural torque of the engine.

Maybe all RNLI drivers are lefthanded !
__________________

__________________
http://www.xfire.com/download/
Biggles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 March 2008, 17:00   #3
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: cornwall
Boat name: nothing
Make: rib eye 430
Length: 4m +
Engine: tatsu 50
MMSI: 666
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,916
sitting on the right the throttle rolls backwards/ towards you as on a motorbike .
Sitting on the left the throttle twists away from you which for me anyway felt wrong and I couldn't control it properly .
Also depends what side of the motor the tiller is mounted on , most are on the rhs I think so its a longer stretch sitting on the left tube ??From memory i haven't driven a sib since last year
__________________
ian parkes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 March 2008, 17:05   #4
Member
 
martini's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Channel Islands
Town: jersey
Boat name: Martini II
Make: Arctic 28/FC470
Length: 8m +
Engine: twin 225Opti/50hp 2t
MMSI: 235067688
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 3,021
I'm right handed and always sit on the right on tiller steered boats!
I think the gears are always on the right too
__________________
martini is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 March 2008, 17:10   #5
Member
 
SeaSkills's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Scotland
Town: Oban (mostly)
Make: Ribcraft, Humber,BWM
Length: 5m +
Engine: Outboards
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 632
Send a message via Skype™ to SeaSkills
Tiller is actually on the left. Sitting on the opposite side, and using the left hand to drive, allows a greater range of movement - especially in a hard turn to port when you can swing the tiller behind you. Also allows easier co-ordination of throttle and gears (on starboard side of engine) in astern
__________________
SEASKILLS TRAINING
Web; www.seaskills.co.uk
Email; info@seaskills.co.uk
Tel; 07525 012 013
SeaSkills is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 March 2008, 17:17   #6
Member
 
Country: UK - Wales
Town: swansea
Boat name: Too Blue
Make: BLANK
Length: 8m +
Engine: Suzuki DT225
Join Date: Mar 2004
Posts: 12,791
I always sit on the left with a tiller as I am right handed I find it much easier to steer with my proper hand!!!
__________________
codprawn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 March 2008, 17:22   #7
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Town: cornwall
Boat name: nothing
Make: rib eye 430
Length: 4m +
Engine: tatsu 50
MMSI: 666
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 1,916
Quote:
Originally Posted by SeaSkills View Post
Tiller is actually on the left. Sitting on the opposite side, and using the left hand to drive, allows a greater range of movement - especially in a hard turn to port when you can swing the tiller behind you. Also allows easier co-ordination of throttle and gears (on starboard side of engine) in astern
Yes i got mixed up there after looking at the pics of Andrew.s boat .

If you turn sharply to the right while sitting on the left the tiller is too far to the left so your hand is sort of behind you and harder to controll .
I guess it also depends on the size of the boat , there is more choice wih a bigger boat .
__________________
ian parkes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 March 2008, 17:27   #8
Member
 
ashbypower's Avatar
 
Country: UK - England
Town: Salisbury/Poole
Boat name: Blue C
Make: XS 600
Length: 6m +
Engine: 125hp Opti
MMSI: 235082826/235909566
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 1,439
Quote:
Originally Posted by Biggles View Post
Okay,

First stab at making an idiot of myself.

!
Nick
You Idiot
__________________
Brian C
Harbour Sea School & APS Marine Centre
ashbypower is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 March 2008, 18:29   #9
Member
 
TonyC's Avatar
 
Country: UK - Wales
Make: XS // Delta
Length: 6m +
Engine: 60hp // 2x90hp
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 213
I've always driven tiller steared boats sitting on the starboard side of the boat. for one (as others have pointed out) the gears are on the starboard side of the engine, and I feel you have greater control over the engine. I always teach that you sit on the starboard side too.

Mind you, there are always times when sitting on the port side are advantagous, though usually in a rescue situation (i.e. towing a boat alongside while capsised - was doing this today ) - though after many years of driving using both, it still feels very wierd driving on the port side when I do it
__________________
TonyC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08 March 2008, 18:40   #10
Member
 
Country: UK - England
Boat name: Seashell
Make: Redbay
Length: 7m +
Engine: Inboard diesel
Join Date: Jan 2004
Posts: 5,261
Starboard for me too....
__________________

__________________
Tim M is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -5. The time now is 02:31.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.