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Old 10 April 2016, 17:56   #1
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Bombard C5 Seam question..

I just took a look at a 80's (?) C5 that I could pick up for a song.

The Good.

Tubes look great and have no leaks or patches.

The aluminum floor is complete and in good shape.

The Bad.

The transom is coming unglued and half way off. I can pull the joints apart by hand.

The hull material has peeled back about 3' on both sides and can also be pulled apart by hand.

Although these are rather large issues, I would be willing to take it on if I knew the tube seems were welded and not glued. I worry about the tubes coming apart if they are indeed glued.

Does anyone know if the tubes are welded or glued? Should I just walk away from the boat?

Any info you can give me would be greatly appreciated.
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Old 10 April 2016, 18:07   #2
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I suspect it's welded seams on the tubes (likely to be PVC or Strongan Duotex) and a glued transom. The transom repair is straight forward with the right preparation and ambient temperature.

The tubes can be repaired, again, depends on the extent of damage, and how strong existing weld still is. I know later Zodiacs moved the seam below the waterline, as they were previously located under the rowlocks and rope lace cuff. If this one has the seam above, then walk away, as nigh impossible to fix.
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Old 10 April 2016, 18:23   #3
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Thanks for the reply spartacus.

I will have to look at the boat again to check the seam location.

The asking price is $250 Canadian dollars or 136 Pounds. At that price I would be willing to throw some time and money at it if I was reasonably sure about the seams holding up.
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Old 11 April 2016, 09:08   #4
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Originally Posted by Bodge View Post
Thanks for the reply spartacus.

I will have to look at the boat again to check the seam location.

The asking price is $250 Canadian dollars or 136 Pounds. At that price I would be willing to throw some time and money at it if I was reasonably sure about the seams holding up.
I've replaced the whole hull fabric on a C5, it's pvc and using the correct method there is no problem. Many years ago I posted the gluing method on ribnet so a search should pick it up. My tubes where welded but the hull to tube joint was a glued joint. The vintage was early 1990's.

The transom is a slightly different issue because you're using pvc adhesive to glue onto the transome finish, not pvc, so you're kinda using an inappropriate adhesive for the task and eventually it is likely to fail. It's probable that if you start over by cleaning everything back to bare materials, you'll get it back to as strong a joint as it was when new.

For info, the reason for replacing the hull was to reshape it to make the boat more seaworthy. I increased the height of the keel wood, particularly towards the bow, and made the new hull to suit. It worked very well and much improved the ride in bumpy seas. If you're doing a full hull replacement, I recommend it. It doesn't need much increase in keel depth so it's not entirely radical.
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Old 11 April 2016, 10:32   #5
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You will need to unglue and reglue the entire floor and the entire transom.

DO NOT JUST PULL IT OFF. Use some heat. You may damage the PVC coating otherwise.

The transom wood needs a special primer.

The tubes are ~99% welded. There are some glued penetrations where the baffles were installed. Typically, the penetrations were hidden under the lacing cuff or the floor joint.
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Old 11 April 2016, 12:07   #6
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I've replaced the whole hull fabric on a C5, it's pvc and using the correct method there is no problem. Many years ago I posted the gluing method on ribnet so a search should pick it up. My tubes where welded but the hull to tube joint was a glued joint. The vintage was early 1990's.

The transom is a slightly different issue because you're using pvc adhesive to glue onto the transome finish, not pvc, so you're kinda using an inappropriate adhesive for the task and eventually it is likely to fail. It's probable that if you start over by cleaning everything back to bare materials, you'll get it back to as strong a joint as it was when new.

For info, the reason for replacing the hull was to reshape it to make the boat more seaworthy. I increased the height of the keel wood, particularly towards the bow, and made the new hull to suit. It worked very well and much improved the ride in bumpy seas. If you're doing a full hull replacement, I recommend it. It doesn't need much increase in keel depth so it's not entirely radical.
I was prepared to walk away from the boat but now I'm giving it second thoughts. I do have some DIY gluing experience behind me and am confident I could do a reasonable job with the right preparations and products at hand.

The keel modification you mentioned sound very interesting and I will track down your thread and give it a read.

Thanks for your reply.
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Old 11 April 2016, 12:15   #7
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Originally Posted by office888 View Post
You will need to unglue and reglue the entire floor and the entire transom.

DO NOT JUST PULL IT OFF. Use some heat. You may damage the PVC coating otherwise.

The transom wood needs a special primer.

The tubes are ~99% welded. There are some glued penetrations where the baffles were installed. Typically, the penetrations were hidden under the lacing cuff or the floor joint.
Thanks for the reply.

The transom wood is in good shape and would not take much too sand down to fresh wood. But I am not sure what product to seal the wood with after sanding. I take it that paint is not a good idea?

Also, the primer needed, do I apply that directly to the wood, build up a layer and then use the appropriate PVC glue?
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Old 11 April 2016, 16:59   #8
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The transom wood is in good shape and would not take much too sand down to fresh wood. But I am not sure what product to seal the wood with after sanding. I take it that paint is not a good idea?
Any good quality epoxy marine paint is likely to be ok. Polyester (fibreglass) resin would be ok too. You'd need to add a wee drop of wax to it to prevent it remaining sticky on the surface.
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Old 11 April 2016, 17:34   #9
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Any good quality epoxy marine paint is likely to be ok. Polyester (fibreglass) resin would be ok too. You'd need to add a wee drop of wax to it to prevent it remaining sticky on the surface.
Thanks for the advice. If I've taken the whole thing apart I might as well give the transom a thin layer of glass cloth and be done with it, paint then reassemble.
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Old 11 April 2016, 18:53   #10
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Thanks for the advice. If I've taken the whole thing apart I might as well give the transom a thin layer of glass cloth and be done with it, paint then reassemble.
If you do that, be sure to rough up the surface of the wood to provide a key - drag a hand saw criss-cross all over it to tear it up - because polyester resin doesn't adhere well to the surface of plywood.
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