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Old 24 July 2014, 13:40   #1
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Country: UK - England
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Beach launch

Hi ,

I have recently bought a 3.3m sib with a 4 stroke 9.9hp outboard. I am looking for tips on beach launching at Beesands in Devon. Any tips would be much apreciated

thanks
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Old 24 July 2014, 14:16   #2
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I am not familiar with the area, but get a good set of launch wheels which a reasonable surface area. Your boat is light enough that putting the anchor, fuel tank, and other heavy stuff right up against the transom, should allow you to move it about alone. Either put on a set of waders, drysuit, or sandals with shorts, then walk it bow out into the waves. Start the engine with the kill switch connected to you. Depending on wave action you may need someone to hold the boat, or you may want to start it while standing in the water then jump in. If it is calmer you could paddle out a little then start the engine.
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Old 24 July 2014, 14:46   #3
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Thanks Peter,

I have a set of rubber launch wheels that have a good tyre pressure. There are only going to be waves of max 8" on Saturday which is why im feeling brave!! Only used the boat twice in a river and fancy seeing the coastline from a different angle.
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Old 24 July 2014, 15:24   #4
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You want a low tire pressure. Level the boat out with the engine on, plus all gear in the back of the boat, then lower the tire pressure until they start to bulge a little. That will give them more surface area, and keep them from sinking into the sand.

The only other things I would recommend are a lifejacket, and a VHF radio, preferably with DSC. A cell phone in a dry box is good, but not nearly as good as a handheld VHF. Oh and some water and snacks for spending a few hours enjoying the coast.
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Old 24 July 2014, 15:35   #5
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Thanks for your help.

It is a shallow shingle beach, will this matter?

I have life jackets, vhf radio etc. Only thing i dont have is an anchor.
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Old 24 July 2014, 15:47   #6
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in the sea you might be better off with a drogue than an anchor depends how far out your going
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Old 24 July 2014, 15:48   #7
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would suggest that an anchor is essential, if the engine packs in you will be completely at the mercy off the currents. Would you drive a car around with no handbrake? Also, I would suggest to expect to get wet launching, once you accept this it's one less thing to worry about, I tend to wear quick drying or wicking clothing which is actually my running wear. Also, in all the excitement don't forget the cooling effect of being on the water, if you're prone to burning in the sun you'll do it at sea and not even notice. Don't underestimate fuel useage, best to bring lots back in rather than run out. Do not let any ropes hang out of the boat that can snag the prop. Do have a great time, I now use my sib instead of using my f/glas boat because of fun and flexibility.
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Old 24 July 2014, 15:52   #8
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a drogue will hold you against the current where a anchor may not reach the bottom
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Old 24 July 2014, 18:58   #9
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an anchor will reach the bottom if you take enough rope and chain, a drougue will not keep you in one place in the event of an emergency.
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Old 24 July 2014, 19:59   #10
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I agree with McNish. A drogue only works when it's wind against tide and then only slows your drift to a degree. Works a treat for fishing if conditions/tide allows to slow the drift.

I'm fairly new to sibbing in general but am a serious kayak angler and the same principles apply. I consider an anchor as a vital piece of safety equipment. You are unlikely to be over very deep water around the UK coast in in-shore waters.

Rule of thumb is three times depth to six times depth depending on tide flow, i.e if it's 10m deep you need around 30m of warp. I like to use 2kg bruce style anchor and a meter or so of chain.

The chain is there so your anchor rope don't cut off on sharp rocks etc and also prevents the anchor from loosing purchase due to swell action. I like the Bruce style anchors as they don't have sharp points like claw anchors, folding grapnel anchors work well over rocky sea-bottoms.

We have been using the same anchor setup on a mates sib that we use on the kayaks. It consists of a decent dive reel with 2-3mm braided cord. Get 100m of line on that easily so unlikely to not have enough warp to get you anchored up. I find using 2-3mm cord is ideal, not to thin so it cuts your hands but the thin diameter means there's less drag so your anchor won't slip. This all packs away nice and small and no loose line on the deck/bucket etc just waiting to tangle up. I frequently anchor in the Mersey mouth with this setup and the tide pushes very hard through there. You could of course use a thicker and shorter length of rope... That's just my method.
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