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Old 18 June 2008, 18:58   #11
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Always Starboard for me

Someone correct me if I'm wrong here but as far as I know small outboards are designed to be steered from the starboard side to counteract the torque produced by the prop.

If I make a right turn while sat on the port side I find the tiller ends up sticking in my stomach and can even restrict the movement of the tiller (maybe that's just too much beer)

also, I find being a biker it's more natural to twist the grip towards me instead of away
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Old 18 June 2008, 19:59   #12
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sounds right

Sounds right to me, until my bike accident then had to re- think everything. I will gradually go to a steering wheel when I sell my rib and sib and get into a nice size sib that Iíll keep a long time
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Old 18 June 2008, 21:06   #13
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My tiller is on the port side. Using my left arm to work the tiller is what I'm used to, but the Gemini is way too wide to sit on the starboard tube and reach all the way across to the tiller. I've been experimenting with various forward facing seating arrangements that are offset to the starboard side. My plan is to have a removeable jerry can cradle/jockey sEat fabriated out of aluminum. (See page 3 of 'My Whacky SIB' thread for a diagram)
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Old 19 June 2008, 01:48   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Locozodiac View Post
If stardboard tube is the one you can sit & drive while seing the engine exiting water indicator, will be a fine position, also will depend on boaters comfort if you are left or righ handed. If your tail catches up a plastic bag, algae, kelp, etc, and not aware of, surely will have a serious engine overheat if seated on the opposite position.
Hmmm. I had two overheat alarms on my Achilles 14/Honda 40. Both were caused by a blade of kelp folding over the leg and blocking the water intake. In addition, I had one failure of the telltale, of unknown origin, but probably due to sand/shell/something ingestion and lodging in the telltale tube.

The only one I saw was the debris one. The alert for the kelp ones was the alarm.

Bottom line: I don;t think folks will be looking at the telltale enough for that to be a factor of where to drive the boat from.

jky
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Old 19 June 2008, 04:53   #15
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Port side for me!
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Old 19 June 2008, 07:43   #16
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Which Side Does Sir Sit!

Port, even though I am an ex-biker
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Old 19 June 2008, 08:54   #17
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Port for the tiller steer, Starboard for the steering wheel steer !
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Old 19 June 2008, 09:46   #18
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Small sibs - Starboard, for the same twist grip etc comfort reasons as mentioned already, but also because on the older engnes, the gear lever is generally on that side too.......

Large Sibs like the 5m Avon Workboat (W500?) I'll sit port, simply 'coz otherwise I'm at fingertip distance from the tiller, even when motoring ahead.
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Old 19 June 2008, 09:53   #19
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Starboard. It is much easier to steer with left arm... However I am looking occasionally on a water pump outlet.

BTW if you know how to hold drill you can direct water out pretty much to any direction.
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Old 19 June 2008, 13:42   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jyasaki View Post
Bottom line: I don;t think folks will be looking at the telltale enough for that to be a factor of where to drive the boat from.

jky
If your engine doesn't have an over heat alarm as most portable engine does, you should look for the water exit indicator if cruising/boating through kelpy seas. Or prepare your wallet for a costly engine repair.

http://www.pbase.com/locozodiac/image/14816033

Happy Boating
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