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Old 06 March 2012, 05:38   #11
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[QUOTE=Peter_C;448887]I own a folding grapnel anchor for my kayak and would never consider it for my boat. They "FOLD" and often when you don't want them too.

Good point there Peter C ,
From past experience not a bad idea to bob a cable tie around the lock ring if its slack
also if the boat is moving/drifting fast they can also tumble /spin along certain types of sand or flat seabed or flat rockscar for a long time before latching on,
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Old 06 March 2012, 11:09   #12
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I've never seen a grapnel actually hook up in sand. I have, however, seen them hook up too well in a boulder bottom.

Depends on the substrate you'll be anchoring in, but I would go with a better design for just about any bottom type. The space savings doesn't justify the lack of security with a grapnel.

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Old 06 March 2012, 14:52   #13
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I've used my 2.5kg Bruce in sand, it held the SIB perfectly well against a combined tide and wind. It's VERY small and presents no puncture risk to a SIB.
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Old 06 March 2012, 15:08   #14
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I have a Bruce as well, the grapel is not reliable enough for me to leave the boat unattended. Mine is 6kgs I think? I use about 5ft of really heavy 3/8" chain and then 10 more feet of lighter 1/4" chain. Then 250ft of 3/8" line.
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Old 06 March 2012, 17:04   #15
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Curious if others do something similar as below? Or where do you tie your anchor off too?

The tow bridle in the front was built for anchoring so there are always two points of contact on the boat. Hence why it also has a knot in the front for the carabiner to pass thru in case one side breaks loose it won't slip away.
[/QUOTE]

Like the bridle, can I ask what knot you use to connect the carabiner to the anchor rope at the desired depth?
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Old 06 March 2012, 17:14   #16
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Curious if others do something similar as below? Or where do you tie your anchor off too?

Like the bridle, can I ask what knot you use to connect the carabiner to the anchor rope at the desired depth?
I just used the front ring on my SIB. The 3 point connection was overkill IMO. The bitter end (inside) was tied off to one of the interior grab lines.

I now have a RIB, but don't have an anchor roller. To avoid having the anchor line rubbing the tubes under tension I use a short 2 carabiner bridle from the bow eye. I use a clove hitch to attach the free carabiner to the anchor line at the chosen length/depth. The other end is tied off to an eye bolt inside the anchor locker so if the carabiner or knot were to fail the boat will still be anchored just alot more line will be out.
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Old 06 March 2012, 19:33   #17
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Ah I see - like this then for the anchor line end? (picture credit wikipedia!)
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Old 06 March 2012, 19:46   #18
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Ah I see - like this then for the anchor line end? (picture credit wikipedia!)
Works well for me, and comes undone after being loaded. Just leave some slack in the boat end so the knot can cinch properly. You could certainly tie various other hitches, but few come undone nicely after being loaded like a clove hitch.

I would skip the locking carabiner, the locking sleeve will seize up in saltwater pretty fast. The wire gated carabiners work well and when they get sticky you can wash the corrosion off with vinegar in a ultrasonic bath.

hint: make two bites (aka "ears"), one with each hand in the same direction either clockwise or counterclockwise doesn't matter. Then pass them on opposite sides of each other. Clip the carabiner into the middle and you're done. Having a hard time finding a diagram of how to tie it...
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Old 07 March 2012, 04:28   #19
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I reckon you should carry as much as you conveniently can. Your chain will hold the anchor stock down, and the more rope you have, within reason, the more securely and comfortably you will sit at anchor. Oh, and do work in yards, not metres!
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Old 07 March 2012, 04:59   #20
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Clove hitch (and many other knots) Clove Hitch using Loops | How to tie a Clove Hitch | Boating Knots

I pull a 2 foot loop of the anchor line through the bow eye attached carabiner (a stainless steel locking one) and then secure this to the line going back down to the seabed with a round turn and two half hitches - I have seen clove hitches slip as tension is applied and released.
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