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Old 31 October 2006, 18:19   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The Garfish View Post
i rekomend whail fatt insted ov greese forr weel barings.

sea bowgi forr deetayls ov wher too by itt fromm

gaRf
GARF - thin ice

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Old 31 October 2006, 19:05   #22
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Originally Posted by rbw156 View Post
It it essential to replace the outer bearing race as I found this quite difficult on my trailer? Can I get away with leaving it in place and replace the bearing with the same make?
You should really replace the inner and outer. They will be matched at manufacture. However, I've seen two bins at Indispension, one holding the inner races and the other containing the outer tracks and they just pick one from each bin.

You shouldn't have too much difficulty changing the outer. You need a drift with a nice flat end so it doesn't slip from the bearing when you tap the little you can see of it. The hub may have recesses for positioning the drift. Chap the rear of the bearing track at opposite sides, one chap at a time. Replace it by tapping the outer on opposite sides until it is caught firmly in the recess, check it for level, place the old bearing on top of the new and place a block of hardwood on top of them both. Whack cleanly and check for straightness after each whack. If the old bearing gets set into the hub a short distance, it's an easy matter to turn the hub over and use the drift to remove it the same way as you originally did. Use the drift to give a final tap on its rim on opposite sides. It should sound very firm.

It goes without saying that you should never drive the outer into place by applying pressure to the inner. This will cause the rollers to damage the surface of the outer and inner tracks. You probably wont be able to see the damage but the the bearing will have a short life. If you have a suitable press to refit them, all the better.

An extra precaution. The edges of the bearing recess can be very sharp. If you wipe out the grease with you finger, take care. Personal experience.
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Old 31 October 2006, 19:48   #23
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Bearing Savers

Hi guys

I cannot say enough in praise of the bearing savers. . Excelent product.

From experience I advise keeping them topped up with waterproof grease. I always add some grease before any sort of a journey to the point of having the grease running out of them.

I also top up the grease before emersion and always let the bearings cool down for approx 30 minutes before emersion.

rgds
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Old 31 October 2006, 19:49   #24
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Originally Posted by Derrick View Post
On unbraked trailers I have used bearing buddies (bearing savers I think this side of the pond) and always found that the pressure on the grease especially when warm from a run forced said fluid grease past the inner grease seal and spread it liberally around the inside of the tyre.

Having had this experience I have formed the view that this would happen also with braked trailers except in the latter case the escaping grease will be distributed liberally inside my brake drums. I would not welcome quantities of messy grease lubricating my brakes! I may be overly cautious here but this is my story.
Nah. The grease ends up on the inside of the wheel rims. The grease escapes behind the drum backing plate (well, behind, in a looking-straight-at-the-wheel manner.)

I trailer about 100 miles each way usually 2 or 3 times a month. Other than adding a bit of grease now and then, I have had zero hub related problems.

I do a quick bearing test by simply feeling the exposed hub at a stop. Should run warm, possibly into the hot range, but should not run too-hot-to-touch. Actually, even in the hot range, I'd suspect something requiring investigation.

Remember that trailer brakes will add heat to the equation as well, disk brakes especially so.

Pretty good directions for whoever was asking about a DIY bearing job:
http://www.championtrailers.com/techsup.html#packhubs


jky
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Old 31 October 2006, 21:09   #25
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re wheel bearings

wheel bearings and salt water do not mix even if thay are sealed for life,
try to avoid sealed fro life bearings as you need a press to but them in
tapered bearings are the best i have found i carry some spare s in my car so can change them at the road side if i have to.( only takes about 1/2 hrs if you know what to do) but if you jack up the wheel when you are up the slip way if no movement you should get home
i find bearing buddys the best thing as they pump grease in all the time so no water can get in , a good investment as you dont want to change a wheel/bearing on the road side in the rain and its always dark.
just check you wheels/bearings befor a long trip just like you would check your car engine oil etc
best thing dont put the bearinges in the water try to keep them out of water and on the slip.beach launch no choice but to get the trailer in the water.

thanks
stephen
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Old 01 November 2006, 04:43   #26
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http://ribworld.com/forum/showthread...=castrol+heavy
unfortunately can't get castrol heavy anymore but a waterproof grease and bearing savers seem to do the job, together with taking 'em apart and regreasing. Our trailers still have the original bearings in them and one of them is 5 years old-used regularly (very) and trailed loadsa miles. Brakes and brake cables give me a lot more trouble than bearings these days.
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Old 01 November 2006, 05:13   #27
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Coincidentally, last week I put in my Castrol order and included Spheerol. I'll report back when I've given it a thorough testing.
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Old 01 November 2006, 07:23   #28
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oooh Spheerol- I've got a tube of that in the garage, never plucked up the courage to try it yet, but then again hadnt seen the spec before. Looks good but it was ***** expensive when I bought it by the tube compared to Castrol Heavy. Still if it does the business its cheaper than sitting by the roadside replacing a wheel bearing. When I replaced my brake cables this year the guy at the little trailer supply place that he runs from a farm building apologised to me for only having cables with grease nipples on them. I didnt think you could get them anymore so we will see how these last with an occassional squirt of grease in them. Ok grease causes some friction in a new cable- but a sight less than rust does in a used one!
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Old 01 November 2006, 07:47   #29
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Originally Posted by wavelength View Post
. Ok grease causes some friction in a new cable- but a sight less than rust does in a used one!
Too right. Just connect a big return spring at the front to haul them back. Or a piece of fat shock cord will do the trick.
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Old 01 November 2006, 08:23   #30
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What a good idea,never thought of that -I'll give it a try!
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